Graduating Advice & Strawberries in Cointreau

It’s graduation season. Politicians, celebrities and the wisest among us take to podiums and blather on about one thing or another. In most cases, they offer some kind of advice. These important people extol the virtues of goal setting and hard work. They like to use phrases like dream big, dare to fail and never give up. They hope to inspire the next generation to climb mountains, reach for the stars and seek the truth … or some such thing.

My advice is simpler, much simpler. Learn to cook. In an age of fast food and microwave dinners, it’s tempting to give the kitchen a pass. Don’t. Cooking is both creative and calming. As you gain knowledge and confidence, you will delight in combining ingredients in new and different ways. Plus, the rhythmic stirring and chopping will calm you after a busy day. Knowing how to cook will feed your stomach and your soul. (It will also help you save money to pay off those student loans.)

When I look at life and work, cooking stands out for one particular reason. It can bring almost instant gratification. For so much of what we do, progress is not measured in hours but in weeks, months or years. A book can take years to write, rewrite and write again. A teacher will work for months hoping for a breakthrough with reluctant students. Complicated business projects take weeks or months to complete. As for raising kids, tending a garden, building and maintain strong and happy relationships – these are never-ending works in progress.

But cooking – even Thanksgiving, the biggest of all holiday feasts is prepped, cooked and served in a couple of days. With a little planning, a weekend dinner party can be tossed together in an afternoon and an any-day-of-the-week meal is done in an hour. As for the reward – you will taste it immediately. Better yet, you will see it in the smiles and hear it in the animated chatter and laughter around the table. A good meal with people you love will make your heart sing.

Which brings me to my next point – invite friends and family to eat with you. Food is more than sustenance; eating is a communal rite. A meal is meant to be shared. Food tastes better when served with a side of stimulating conversation, harmless banter and silly jokes.

Perhaps a dinner party, even the idea, scares the bejeebers out of you. Don’t let it. In the words of Julia Child, “No matter what happens in the kitchen, never apologize,” So what if the soup is a little spicy or the dog steals the turkey? If anyone remembers, it will be another great story to tell and retell. Sure, you’ll look back at some of your mishaps with a grimace but, more important, you’ll also look back with a giggle.

To close, I have two utterly practical suggestions. First, get a big bowl. Only the most timid of cooks can make do with one of those nesting sets of three. You won’t use that giant bowl every day but you’ll be happy to have it. I have a couple, a big one at eight quarts and a really big one at fourteen. Cooking requires a lot of tossing and mixing – give yourself plenty of room to do it with gusto.

Second, start every party with an empty dishwasher. Like it or not, even the loveliest of evenings do come to an end. Eventually, you must clear the table. Cleanup is faster and easier if you can immediately stack all those dishes in the dishwasher. Oh, and yes, I know many first (even second) apartments don’t have dishwashers. This rule also applies to the sink. It should be empty of dirty dishes when your guests arrive.

Have a wonderful life filled with happy friends around table. Bon appétit!

Strawberries in Cointreau
Sometimes the simplest of desserts can be the most delicious – especially when local strawberries are coming into season. Enjoy!
Serves 8

2 pounds strawberries, hulled and quartered or halved, depending on size
About 2 ounces Cointreau
Zest of 1 orange
Brown sugar to taste
Whipped cream or vanilla ice cream (optional)

Place the strawberries in a bowl large enough for tossing. Drizzle with Cointreau, sprinkle with orange zest and gently toss. If necessary, add a little brown sugar and toss again.

Let the strawberries sit for about 10 minutes while you put the dinner dishes in the sink to soak or fill the dishwasher.

Toss again and serve the strawberries with a spoonful of whipped cream or ice cream.

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One Year Ago – Southwest Turkey Burgers
Two Years Ago – Cherry Cobbler
Three Years Ago – Heirloom Tomatoes with Balsamic Reduction
Four Years Ago – Strawberry Shortcakes with Cardamom Cream
Five Years Ago – Strawberries with Yogurt Cream
Six Years Ago – Chocolate-Chocolate Sorbet
Seven Years Ago – Caesar Salad with Parmesan Croutons
Eight Years Ago – The Best Grilled Cheese Sandwich in the History of my Kitchen
Nine Years Ago – Asian Slaw

Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!

What advice would you give to this year’s new graduates? Feel free to share!

Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook. © Susan W. Nye, 2018

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Let Him Eat Steak! Father’s Day Weekend Special

How will you celebrate Father’s Day? It promises to be summery this weekend so a cookout sounds like a good idea. Fire up the grill and throw on some steaks for some deliciously fun family time.

Need some help with your menu? Not to worry, I have a few suggestions …

My latest steak recipe is perfect for dads who like a hint of Asia. My Grilled Vietnamese Beef is a wonderful combination of beef and greens. Serve it with a spoonful of basmati rice. To keep with the theme, start your meal with one of my favorite warm weather appetizers – Sumner Rolls.

Perhaps your dad likes his steak bistro style. If that’s the case, then start with my Mixed Greens with Grilled Asparagus, Cucumber & Avocado. For the main course, dads will love my Grilled Steak with Gorgonzola Sauce or Grilled Filet Mignons & Mushrooms with Stilton Butter. Add a few Grilled Red Potatoes.

Now for dessert. If your dad has a favorite, then by all means, make it. If not, then maybe he’d like my dad’s favorite Blueberry Pie. Dad is also pretty found of my Chocolate-Espresso Cheesecake and Chocolate-Peanut Butter Tart.

Happy Father’s Day and bon appétit!

For a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog Click Here!!

What’s up with you this weekend? I’d love to hear from you! Let’s get a conversation going.

Want more? Click here for more seasonal menus! © Susan W. Nye, 2018

Forget the Necktie & Grilled Vietnamese Beef

You’ve got five days to get it together, so, don’t blow it. And by it, I mean Father’s Day. If you are suddenly caught unawares, don’t worry you are not alone. Father’s Day is probably the most overlooked or just plain forgotten holiday in the whole panoply of fêtes, festivals and celebrations. Mom gets brunch, cards and flowers. If we remember, Dad gets another necktie.

In the era of business casual, most men, spend their days in Dockers and button-down shirts. The pants are always navy blue. Although the shirts are always light blue, they generally come in a variety of strips, checks and plaids. If he’s retired, your dad has probably traded in his navy blue trousers for khaki and button-downs for golf shirts. Working or retired, most dads have not worn a necktie more than a handful of times since 1998. Of course, there are exceptions. There are always exceptions. While politicians, talk show hosts, bankers and Wall Street wonders are the most obvious tie wearers, there could be others.

That’s not to say that a beautiful necktie is not appreciated. In fact, I’m proud to say, I gave my dad his favorite tie, pale yellow with light blue catboats. However, it was ages ago, 1998 or maybe 1997, and it wasn’t for Father’s Day. It was a Christmas gift. I can’t say for certain, but there is a good chance I neglected him that Father’s Day. (In my defense, I was living an ocean away.)

Anyway, about that favorite tie, it may be twenty years old but he still likes it enough to find an excuse to wear it once if not twice a year. I suspect that it would be near impossible to find one to replace it. Any new necktie would just join the pile he never wears but refuses to throw away. Most are boring navy blue with equally boring stripes. One has catboats but they sail across a dark, drab background.

All right then, if ties are out, what’s in?

How about socks? Think ridiculously bright colors, stars, stripes or polka dots. A beautiful pair of socks will add a little life to dad’s wardrobe. If he’s the conservative type, you might point to Bush 41. The former president has a spectacular collection of socks. My oldest niece gave Dad a couple of fun pairs for Christmas a few years ago. They are his party socks and he loves them.

Something to eat or drink? Here you have an endless list of possibilities from a bottle of dad’s favorite bourbon to a trio of intriguing hot sauces or mustards. If he can’t start the day without a great cup of Joe, then a pound of really good coffee sounds like a plan. Then again, you can help him get his grill on by signing him up for the steak of the month club.

Maybe you should give him the gift of time together? Instead of a book he’s already read or a shirt that doesn’t fit, plan an experience you can share together. Think about what your dad might like to do or see and make it happen. If he loves baseball, take him to Fenway. Fine wines – find a tasting and spend an evening sipping and spitting together. Wannabe chef – sign the two of you up for a cooking class. History buff – walk the Freedom Trail with him. You see, it’s not so hard.

Happy Father’s Day and bon appétit!

Grilled Vietnamese Beef
Give your favorite steak-and-potatoes man a taste of Asia this Father’s Day. Trying new things will keep dad young. Serve the beef with jasmine rice. Enjoy!

Serves 8
8 cloves garlic, finely chopped
5-6 limes
4 tablespoons soy sauce
4 tablespoons fish sauce
3 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons brown sugar
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
3 pounds tenderloin filets or sirloin steaks, trimmed
1-2 red onions, cut in half and then in 1/4-inch wedges
1-2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
12 ounces arugula
1 cup cilantro leaves
1/2 cup mint leaves, cut in julienne

Make the marinade: put the garlic, juice and zest of 2 limes, soy sauce, fish sauce, olive oil and brown sugar in a bowl, season with salt and pepper and whisk to combine.

Put the beef in a large flat dish and the onion in a bowl. Add about 3/4 of the marinade to the beef and the remainder to the onions. Flip the beef to coat and toss the onions. Flipping and tossing once or twice, cover and refrigerate both for up to 4 hours. Remove from the refrigerator about 30 minutes before grilling.

Prepare a charcoal or gas grill; the fire should be medium hot.

Remove the steaks from the marinade and shake off any excess. Place the steaks on the grill and cook for 2-3 minutes per side for rare and 4-5 minutes per side for medium rare. Transfer to a cutting board, let the beef rest for 5-10 minutes and then cut across the grain in thin slices.

While the beef rests, drain and transfer the onions to a grill basket. Grill, stirring from time to time, until tender-crisp, 4-6 minutes.

Put the juice of 1 lime and the extra virgin olive oil in a large bowl, season with salt and pepper and whisk to combine. Add the arugula, cilantro and mint and toss to combine.

Cut the remaining limes into wedges.

Transfer the greens to a large platter or individual plates, top with beef and onions, garnish with lime wedges and serve.

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One Year Ago – Grilled Steak with Mushrooms, Onions, Garlic & Rosemary-Balsamic Glaze
Two Years Ago – Grilled Potato Salad
Three Years Ago – Maple-Bourbon Pork Ribs
Four Years Ago – Gravlax with Tarragon-Caper Mustard Sauce
Five Years Ago – Salsa Verde
Six Years Ago – Crunchy Slaw with Cilantro, Mint & Peanuts
Seven Years Ago – New Potato Salad with Gorgonzola
Eight Years Ago – Spicy Hoisin Wings
Nine Years Ago – Grilled Steak & Potato Salad

Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!

How will you celebrate Father’s Day? Feel free to share!

Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook. © Susan W. Nye, 2018

Taco Saturday – Another Weekend Special

I’ve got a couple of busy days writing this weekend. That said, I think I owe someone a dinner so I may need to get out the grill on Saturday. What about you? While I figure out IF I’ll be cooking this weekend, here are a few dishes you and your friends might enjoy this weekend …

It may not be Tuesday but what about tacos?

To start, let everyone sit and relax with a glass of wine and maybe some… Corncakes? Want something a little simpler? How about my Guacamole & Simple Salsa or Watermelon & Cucumber Salsa.

All right, what’s next? Soup or salad? The solstice is still a few weeks away but it’s not too early to serve one of my favorite summer salads. I promise, you will love my Grilled Romaine Salad.

Now for the tacos … I’ve got two suggestions: Grilled Shrimp Tacos and Grilled Zucchini Tacos. You’ve got the grill going, why not serve them both.

Now, top it all off with a sweet treat. What could be better than a little spice and more chocolate in my Mexican Chocolate Pot de Crème or my oh so rich Espresso Brownies.

Have a great weekend and bon appétit!

For a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog Click Here!!

What’s up with you this weekend? I’d love to hear from you! Let’s get a conversation going.

Want more? Click here for more seasonal menus! © Susan W. Nye, 2018

Fifty Years Later & Grilled Salmon & Asparagus Salad

Sometimes an event can change you. Sometimes it takes more, a season or even an entire year. You might not notice it at first. It’s only later that you realize that your path diverged. That nice predictable route everyone fully expected you to travel, well, you didn’t.

For me, it’s happened twice. The first time was fifty years ago. It was 1968 and I’m sure I am not alone. I turned thirteen in March. My mother always said the two worst times in a woman’s life was when she was thirteen and when her daughter was thirteen. With two girls, Mom had an extra dose. Anyway, with the first of many pimples sprouting on my forehead and hormones ricocheting, I guess I was primed to be something of a mess.

It would be an understatement to say that 1968 was a tumultuous year. Seismic might still be too tame a label. Between the war in Vietnam and the civil rights movement, the US was a powder keg in search of a match. The first match flared in January when North Korea seized the USS Pueblo. Next came the Tet Offensive and event after horrible event just kept piling on. In February, police opened fire on students protesting segregation in South Carolina. Three were killed, twenty-seven were wounded. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated in April. Throughout the spring and summer, students protested racism and the war. There were strikes and young men burned their draft cards. Some demonstrations were peaceful, too many were not.

On top of everything, it was an election year. As a seventh grader, I was far from riveted by the various campaigns. Who were these old men? They seemed powerless, or maybe just disinterested, to end the war and the multitude of problems that plagued the country. That all changed when Robert Kennedy got into the race. He brought just enough hope to penetrate the psyche of a self-absorbed thirteen year old.

I still remember where I was and how I felt when I learned that Robert Kennedy had been shot. It was 6:00 in the morning. Like most school days, I was the first one up – not by choice but necessity. Stumbling into the bathroom, I flipped on the little radio that kept me company every morning while brushing my teeth and washing my face. Kennedy was ahead in the polls when I was sent to bed the night before. Winning California would most likely make him the democratic nominee for president. Knowing full well that, “It ain’t over till it’s over,” my ears were tuned for a confirmation.

The shooting was not the opening news story on the radio. It was the only story. I’m not even sure if the WRKO played any music that morning. (For anyone too young to remember, RKO, as we called it, was not always a home for conservative talk radio. In the sixties and seventies, it played top forty hits and was the station of choice for many teenagers.)

The news that another Kennedy had been shot was mind numbing. In spite of the already humid heat on that early June morning, the horror of another senselessness shooting left me feeling cold and empty. To make matters worse, the year was only half over and it didn’t get any better. Fifty years later, I only rarely get a pimple. However, morning, afternoon or evening, early June, September or February, senseless violence and prejudice continue to leave me feeling hollow … but now, I can and do vote.

Be sure to vote in the mid-term elections and bon appétit!

Grilled Salmon & Asparagus Salad
A perfect meal for one of those hot and humid June evenings. Enjoy!
Serves 8

2 1/2-3 pounds salmon fillet, skin-on
Olive oil
Sea salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
Juice of 1/2-1 lemon
1 1/2-2 pounds asparagus, trimmed
About 8 ounces mixed baby greens
1 pint cherry tomatoes – in a mix of colors if available
1/3-1/2 European cucumber, peeled, seed and chopped
2-3 scallions, thinly sliced
Vinaigrette Niçoise (recipes follows)
3-4 tablespoons capers, drained

Preheat the grill to high. Drizzle the salmon with a little olive oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Drizzle the asparagus with olive oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper and toss to coat.

Place the salmon, skin side up, on the grill. Depending on the thickness of the fish, grill for 5-6 minutes. Carefully turn the salmon with a wide spatula and grill for 3-5 minutes more or until cooked through but not dry.

Arrange the asparagus on the grill and, depending on thickness, cook for 1-3 minutes. Do not overcook, the asparagus should be tender-crisp.

Transfer the fish and asparagus to a cutting board and drizzle with lemon juice. Let the fish rest for about 5 minutes before cutting into thick slices. If you like, chop the asparagus.

To serve: put the greens, tomatoes, cucumber and scallions in a bowl, add enough Vinaigrette Niçoise to lightly coat and toss to combine. Arrange the salad on a large platter or individual plates, top with salmon and asparagus and sprinkle with capers.

Vinaigrette Niçoise
1/4 cup red wine vinegar
Juice of 1/2 lemon
1-2 tablespoons mayonnaise
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
3 cloves garlic
1-inch chunk red onion
1 teaspoon anchovy paste
Dash hot sauce
Sea salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
3/4 cup or to taste extra-virgin olive oil

Put the vinegar, lemon juice, mayonnaise, mustard, garlic, onion, anchovy paste and hot sauce in a blender or small food processor, season with salt and pepper and pulse to combine and chop the garlic and onion. With the machine running, slowly add the olive oil and process until smooth.

Store extra vinaigrette in the refrigerator.

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One Year Ago – Strawberry Tort
Two Years Ago – Grilled Potato Salad
Three Years Ago – Grilled Salmon with Lemon-Herb Quinoa Salad
Four Years Ago – Chocolate-Peanut Butter Tart
Five Years Ago – Salsa Verde
Six Years Ago – Blueberry Crumb Cake
Seven Years Ago – Peanut-Sesame Dipping Sauce
Eight Years Ago – Strawberry Gelato
Nine Years Ago – Asparagus Soup

Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!

How do you beat the heat in the early days of summer? Feel free to share!

Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook. © Susan W. Nye, 2018

End of School Days & Grilled Zucchini Tacos

As we roll into June, the end is in sight. Ah, I remember it well, those last few weeks of hell. Literally and figuratively, that last month of school is a tough one. If you need any proof, check out the local preschools. Most of them closed at the end of last week. They get it.

With each passing day, temperatures steadily climb and those lumbering brick buildings heat up. The windows may be open wide but, by mid-June, the air is nothing short of oppressive. Some teachers close the blinds; then it’s both hot and stuffy. Toss in some of our famous northeast humidity and the entire school feels a gym locker room. By Friday, it smells like a locker room as well. However, since we live in the northern New England, no one but no one would or should even think about investing in air conditioning. As a taxpayer, I stand firmly behind this long omission. Let the kids sweat. We did.

As bad as those hot, dank classrooms and hallways are, the end of the year cram might be even worse. Who doesn’t remember the day your European history teacher suddenly realized there were only three weeks to the final bell? There you were, smack in the middle of the complexities of the Napoleonic Wars. With lightning speed, the class raced through colonialism, Darwinism, the Russian Revolution, World Wars I and II and the rest of the twentieth century. Dashing from one topic to the next, the teacher affirmed time and time again, yes, you will be tested on this stuff.

While the rush was particularly noticeable in history, it was not limited to delving into the past. Up and down the hallways, our teachers were determined to plow through the remaining curriculum. A final whoosh of angles, differentials and integrals as well as molecules, compounds and diffusion sped into one ear and out the other. One last volume of Shakespeare or Hemingway had to be finished and another group of verbs conjugated.

If anything, afterschool was worse. As teenagers, all we wanted to do was ride around in a convertible with Alice Cooper blasting – school’s out. Up to no good or some harmless fun, we wanted to be anywhere but home on those warm, early summer evenings. A double dose of homework was nowhere on the wish list.

I found it particularly frustrating that my family spent these early summer evenings lolling around outside. Mom and Dad sat on the front stoop while my little brother played with the dog. Neighbors strolled by and stopped to chat. It seemed like everyone was relaxing and having fun but me. While they played, I was in my room, sweating through past participles and suffering through Mendel’s peas. Adding insult to injury, my bedroom was in the front of the house. I could hear everyone having fun while I poured over my books.

Anyway, here’s what I got and it ain’t much. To all the kids still lining up for the bus every morning, be brave. The end is almost in sight. Before you know it, it will be summer and you’ll be complaining about how bored you are.

Stay cool and bon appétit!

Grilled Zucchini Tacos
Zucchini will make a great addition to your next mix and match taco party. Can’t wait? They’ll be perfect by themselves on any Meatless Monday or Taco Tuesday. Enjoy!
Serves 8

2 pints cherry tomatoes – in a mix of colors if available
1-2 red bell peppers, seeded and cut in 1/4-inch strips
1 large red onion, cut in half and then in thin wedges
Olive oil
1 teaspoon cumin
Sea salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
5-6 medium zucchinis, trimmed and sliced on the diagonal 1/4-1/2 inch thick
8 medium or 16 small flour or corn tortillas
Spicy Cilantro-Mint Salsa (recipe follows)
About 4 ounces queso fresco or feta cheese, crumbled

Preheat the grill to high.

Put the tomatoes, peppers and onion in bowl, drizzle with enough olive oil to lightly coat and sprinkle with cumin, salt and pepper. Toss to coat and transfer to a grill basket. Grill for 4-6 minutes, stirring from time to time.

Brush both sides of the zucchini slices with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Place on the grill and cook until just tender, 2-3 minutes per side.

Wrap the tortillas in foil and, turning once, warm on the grill for 2-3 minutes.

To serve: place a tortilla on each plate, top with slices of grilled zucchini and a spoonful or two of grilled tomatoes, drizzle with Spicy Cilantro-Mint Salsa and sprinkle with queso fresco.

Spicy Cilantro-Mint Salsa
Makes about 1 cup

2-3 tablespoons sherry vinegar
Zest and juice of 1 lime
3-4 cloves garlic
2-3 scallions, cut in inch long pieces
1/2-1 or to taste jalapeno, trimmed, halved and seeded
About 2 cups fresh cilantro leaves
About 1 cup fresh mint leaves
Sea salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
1/2 cup or to taste extra-virgin olive oil

Put the vinegar and lime juice in the bowl of a small food processor, add the white and light green parts of the scallions, garlic and jalapeno, season with salt and pepper and pulse to chop and combine. Add the lime zest, herbs and scallion greens and pulse to chop and combine. Add the olive oil and process until finely chopped and well combined.

Let the salsa sit for at least 30 minutes before serving. Can be made ahead, covered and stored in the refrigerator. Serve at room temperature.

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One Year Ago – Grilled Lamb with Fresh Mint
Two Years Ago – Grilled Pork Tenderloin
Three Years Ago – Greek Salad with Grilled Shrimp
Four Years Ago – Asparagus & Radish Salad
Five Years Ago – Salsa Verde
Six Years Ago – Asian Noodle Salad
Seven Years Ago – Asparagus Goat Cheese Tart
Eight Years Ago – Not Your Ordinary Burger
Nine Years Ago – Strawberry Rhubarb Soup

Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!
Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!

How do you beat the heat in the early days of summer? Feel free to share!

Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook. © Susan W. Nye, 2018

Another Memorial Day Weekend Special

In my neighborhood, Memorial Day Weekend is a busy few days. A lot of the houses up and down my street belong to summer people. They bide their time. They are only here when days are warm and the sun shines. A few come up to ski in winter but they are still summer people.

This weekend they will all be around to sweep the cottage, put the boat in the water and maybe, just maybe, take a swim in the ice cold lake.

Mixed with all the hustle and bustle will be a ton of good cheer. Who doesn’t love to be in New Hampshire? … even if the black flies are as thick as thieves. Anyway, if you play your cards right you may get invited to a cookout. So, get out your favorite recipes, make a list, head to the supermarket and be ready for fun.

Here are a few dishes you can bring along to that neighborhood potluck this holiday weekend:

How about a tasty appetizer?
For something a little different, may I suggest … Chickpea Salsa or Crostini with Cucumber, Radish & Feta or Lettuce Cups with Stir-fried Chicken & Vegetables?

Maybe you’d rather bring a salad or a side dish … with asparagus of course.
You can’t lose with my Grilled Asparagus with Lemony Tarragon Butter Sauce (it’s delicious at room temperature) or Mixed Greens with Grilled Asparagus, Cucumber & Avocado or Asparagus Salad with Reduced Balsamic Vinaigrette.

No, then, I guess you’d rather bring a sweet treat:
Rhubarb is in season, so, why not try my Ginger Shortcakes with Rhubarb Compote or Rhubarb Crumb Cake? Want something patriotic for Memorial Day … how about Berry Flag Cake? When all else underwhelms you, bring a batch of the world’s best brownies … Espresso Brownies.

Have a great weekend and bon appétit!

For a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog Click Here!!

What’s up with you this weekend? I’d love to hear from you! Let’s get a conversation going.

Want more? Click here for more seasonal menus! © Susan W. Nye, 2018