Watch Out for the Food Police & A Duo of Aiolis

ketchup_bottleWhat do Pickles, Lollipop and Mr. Ed have in common? No, these are not the names of the top contenders for this year’s Triple Crown. Instead, they are just a few of the offenders in the Food Police’s hall of shame. So what villainous acts have these three and many more foul foods committed? How can they land you in the pokey or lighten your wallet with a hefty fine? Here goes:

Speaking of horses. No, Vicar’s in Trouble needn’t worry. He may have come in dead last at the Kentucky Derby but he won’t end up on tonight’s menu. Slaughtering horses for human consumption is illegal in the United States. However, trusty steeds may want to avoid France and even more so Italy – horsemeat is very popular in both these countries.

Moving on to tomatoes. Fearful that barbarians from New York would influence one of their proudest traditions, the clam chowder bill was brought before the Maine legislature in 1939. This bill made it illegal to add tomatoes to chowder.

With peanut allergies on the rise, many schools prohibit the inimitable PBJ to darken their cafeteria’s door. However, peanut bans are nothing new. It is illegal to buy a sack of peanuts after sunset in Alabama or eat them in church in Boston.

When it comes to children, you can’t be too careful. Kinder Eggs may be a childhood staple in Europe and Canada but they’ve been banned in the United States since 1938. For the uninitiated, a small toy is hidden in each of these hollow chocolate eggs. Fearing that the tiny treasures are a choking hazard, U.S. Customs and Boarder Protection seize tens of thousands of the sweet treats every year.

We are not the only ones to protect our kids. A few years ago, the French government banned school cafeterias from serving ketchup more than once a week. And then only as a condiment for pommes frites … or what we commonly call French fries. The ketchup ban has two goals: to promote healthy eating and protect traditional French cuisine.

Lucky for us, Clint Eastwood did a stint as mayor of Carmel, California. While in office, he made our day and repealed a law that forbade anyone from eating ice cream while standing on the sidewalk. That said, Kentucky, Alabama and New York prohibit carrying an ice cream cone in your pocket. Why anyone would want to carry an ice cream cone in their pocket is beyond me.

Although you can find them on most bank teller counters, lollipops are outlawed in Washington. On top of that, in Massachusetts, candy may not contain more than one percent alcohol. So forget the tequila-pops or bourbon-lollies in either state.

A pickle is not a pickle unless it bounces. At least that’s the case in Connecticut. Not to be outdone, it is illegal to throw pickle juice on the trolley in Rhode Island.

Be careful where you make reservations. Eating in a place that is on fire is against the law in Chicago. And please, don’t get cute if you decide to take out. Sending a bunch of pizzas to a friend without their knowledge will land you a $500 fine in Louisiana.

Before you quote any of the above, please note: tireless hours and exhaustive research have been unable to confirm or deny if these laws are still on the books or ever even existed in the first place.

Have fun and bon appétit!

A Duo of Aiolis
After you try a flavorful aioli with your burger or fries, you’ll never settle for ketchup again. They are also great with chicken, seafood and fresh, steamed or grilled veggies. Enjoy!

Sun-dried Tomato Aioli best_burger_01
Makes about 1 1/2 cups

1/4 cup drained and roughly chopped oil packed sun-dried tomatoes
2 cloves garlic, chopped
2 tablespoons chopped red onion
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons red wine vinegar
Pinch cayenne
Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
2 tablespoons chopped basil
1 tablespoon chopped fresh flat leaf parsley
1 cup or to taste mayonnaise

Put the sundried tomatoes, garlic, onion, mustard, olive oil and vinegar in a blender or small food processor, season with cayenne, salt and pepper and process until well combined and smooth.

Add the basil, parsley and mayonnaise and process until smooth. Cover and chill for an hour or more to combine the flavors.

Spicy Red Pepper Aioli
Makes about 2 cups

2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
2 cloves garlic, chopped
2 scallions, chopped
1 tablespoon or to taste brown sugar
Grated zest and juice of 1 lime
1 tablespoon or to taste sriracha or your favorite hot chili sauce
1 teaspoon fresh thyme
1 teaspoon cumin
Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
3/4 cup roughly chopped roasted and peeled red peppers
1 cup or to taste mayonnaise

Put the olive oil, garlic, scallions, brown sugar, lime juice and sriracha in a blender or small food processor, season with thyme, cumin, salt and pepper and process until well combined and smooth.

Add the lime zest, red peppers and mayonnaise and process until smooth. Cover and chill for an hour or more to combine the flavors.

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One Year Ago – Pork Tenderloin Medallions with Mushrooms & Mustard Sauce
Two Years Ago – Crunch Salad with Apples & Grapes
Three Years Ago – Grilled Mustard Pork Chops
Four Years Ago – Rhubarb Crisp
Five Years Ago – Spicy Grilled Steak
Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!

Food or otherwise, do you have a favorite unusual, even weird law? Feel free to share – let’s get a conversation going.

Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook. In addition, I hope that you will take a minute to learn about my philanthropic project Eat Well-Do Good. © Susan W. Nye, 2014

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4 thoughts on “Watch Out for the Food Police & A Duo of Aiolis

    • Nancy – thanks for stopping by and glad you enjoyed the post. Enjoy your days in France. I lived in Switzerland for 17 years – a wonderful adventure. Take care, Susan

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