The New Kitchen Adventure Continues & Savory Rosemary Biscotti

Well, the fun has begun. My forty-something year old kitchen is now nothing but an empty shell. I managed, just barely, to clear everything out before Bruce the contractor arrived. A pile of freebies, including several interior doors and a gas range, is sitting in my driveway. Most days, something disappears and, just as often, I add something to the pile. The rarely used deep fryer, some thermal mugs and most of the drawers are gone. At some point, anything left will go into the dumpster.

Yes, that’s right; I have a dumpster. In fact, we are on dumpster number two. I really don’t know how the first one filled up so fast. The kitchen isn’t all that big. Why, it’s not much more than a glorified galley. Glorified because instead of the typical eight by eight or ten feet you find in a classic galley kitchen, mine is a luxurious ten by twelve. By the way, those ten feet are just narrow enough that, no matter where he stands, my dad is always in the way.

Now, just because I have a dumpster – don’t go thinking you can come down here with your old television set or that ancient sofa or whatever else the dump won’t take. Sure, I know; it’s tempting but don’t throw any of that stuff in my dumpster. It may be half empty now but it won’t be for long.

So, you ask, what’s it like having your kitchen remodeled? Well, noisy is the first word that comes to mind, very noisy. Followed by dusty. God love Bruce. He can’t do anything about the banging and clanging but he has covered all the doorways with plastic sheeting. It should help keep the dust from spreading to every corner of every room in the house. And God bless my dad, who promptly bumbled through, creating puddles of plastic at every doorway.

Speaking of Dad, Joe Nye thinks the world of Bruce. You see, he reminds Dad of his own father. Grandpa Nye was also a builder. If he was still around today, Grandpa could have been one of those guys on the home and garden network. Not because he could remodel an entire house for $25,000 and then flip it for a huge profit. No, Grandpa Nye could see the whole picture and was all about the details. He made sure all the pieces fit together. In today’s dollars, it would cost more than $25,000 but you would have no doubt that it was worth every penny. I guess, maybe Grandpa was more PBS than HGTV.

Anyway, the key reason Bruce reminds Dad of Grandpa is that, along with his good work, they both sweep up after each task and at the end of the day. Renovations are messy. However, when I walk through the room that once was and will again be my kitchen, there are no dusty piles of bent nails or drywall rubble. There are no half-empty water bottles or coffee cups. As for the plastic sheeting, it’s been carefully re-taped to each doorway.

Although it’s nothing new, the other fallout of renovation is insomnia. Without fail, I wake up around two o’clock every morning for a round of second guessing. Will the utility closet be big enough to hold the vacuum cleaner? A predawn trip downstairs solves that one; the answer is yes, just barely. Should the door slide on the inside of the laundry room or outside? I’m going with outside. The cork flooring is due on Tuesday. Does Tuesday mean before noon or after five? We’ll see. Should the modem stay in the kitchen or move to my office? TBD. Granite or butcher block for that cabinet on the far wall? I have a day or two to figure this one out. Did I remember to email the appliance guy and postpone delivery until Tuesday? Not yet. Does it make sense to have a drain board carved into the granite by the sink? Hmmm, maybe but what would it cost?

… and perhaps most important, what to cook that first night in the new kitchen?

… Bon appétit!

Savory Rosemary Biscotti
Although I have cooked in a convection oven, I have never owned one. That’s all about to change. I’ll be baking up this savory take on the Italian classic for the kitchenwarming. Enjoy!
Makes about 6 dozen biscuits

3 ounces Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, cut in small cubes
2 ounces Pecorino Romano cheese, cut in small cubes
4 cups all-purpose flour plus additional for dusting
1 1/2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh rosemary
2 teaspoons baking powder
2 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
1/2 teaspoon smoked paprika
1 1/2 sticks (3/4 cup) cold butter, cut into small cubes
4 large eggs
1 cup sour cream

Put the oven racks in the upper and lower thirds of the oven and preheat to 350 degrees. Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper.

Put the cheeses in a food processor and pulse to grate and combine. Remove about 1/2 cup of cheese and reserve.

Add the flour, rosemary, baking powder, salt, pepper and paprika to the food processor and pulse to combine with the cheese. Add the butter and pulse until the mixture resembles coarse meal. Transfer the dough to a large bowl.

Put 3 eggs in a bowl and whisk to combine, add the sour cream and whisk again until well combined. Add the wet ingredients to the dough and stir until just combined.

Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and cut into four pieces. Using well-floured hands, pat each piece into a flat log about 10-inches long, 2 inches wide and 1 inch thick. Placing them about 3 inches apart, transfer the logs to the prepared baking sheets.

Put the remaining egg in a bowl and whisk until pale yellow. Brush the logs with the egg and sprinkle with the remaining cheese.

Bake the biscotti for 15 minutes, turn and swap the position of the pans. Continue baking until the logs are golden, about 15 minutes more. Cool the biscotti for about 10 minutes.

Reduce the oven temperature to 300 degrees.

With a serrated knife, slice the logs about 1/2-inch-thick on the diagonal. Arrange the slices, cut side down, in a single layer on baking sheets. Turning once, bake until golden and crisp, 35-45 minutes. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Print friendly version of this post.

One Year Ago – Dilly Beans
Two Years– All Grown Up Grilled Cheese
Three Years Ago – Savory Parmesan Shortbread with Tomato Jam
Four Years Ago – Watermelon-Limeade
Five Years Ago – Curried Green Bean Pickles
Six Years Ago – Grilled Ratatouille Stacks
Seven Years Ago – Apple Crisp
Eight Years Ago – Ravioli with Sage Pesto
Nine Years Ago – Brie & Sun-dried Tomato Omelet

Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!

Help! Do you have any renovation advice to share? Feel free to share!

Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook. © Susan W. Nye, 2017

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2 thoughts on “The New Kitchen Adventure Continues & Savory Rosemary Biscotti

  1. Hi, I’m eager to hear of your experience with convection. I have an oven that gives me the choice of ‘Conventional Bake’ or Convection Bake’, the latter I’m supposed to set 25′ less than recipe calls for, which I am loath to do since then I’m not sure of timing. Sometimes I set it somewhere in between,..

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi Lizzie – I used a convection oven during my chef days. I always set the temperature per the recipe but it usually took less time. I really liked cooking with convection and look forward to using one all the time. Although I’m not really a baker – they say that convection is great for baking. (Not sure who they are!) Come by in a few weeks and see the new kitchen … now it is empty – drywall mudding in progress. Take care – Susan

      Like

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