Saints, Sinners, Songsters & Scholars & Roasted Carrot Salad

Ireland has a long history of saints and sinners, songsters and scholars. Hundreds of impressive artistic, scientific, political and religious figures hail from the Emerald Isle. And yes, there have been a few scamps and scalawags. The roll call of luminaries is all the more impressive when you consider Ireland’s tiny population. Although it has had its ups and downs, less than five million people call Ireland home. By the way, close to thirty-five million Americans claim Irish roots.

Saint Patrick’s Day is this coming Saturday. In celebration, let’s name a few of the Ireland’s notable sons and daughters:

Established in 1662, students still memorize Robert Boyle’s Law (PV=K). In simple terms, Boyles’ Law shows that the relationship between volume and pressure is inversely proportionate. In other words, increase pressure and volume will shrink.

William Butler Yeats is remembered as one of the 20th century’s leading poets and playwrights. He received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1923. I think my dad in particular would appreciate a favorite Yeats’ quote … There are no strangers here; Only friends you haven’t yet met.

Add James Joyce to that list of influential authors. His masterpiece Ulysses is almost always on the list of top ten English language novels and frequently steals the number one slot. It may also have the dubious honor of being the most unread book of all time. Countless confessions suggest that while it can be found on millions of bookshelves, it is on almost as many to-read lists.

The Most Dangerous Woman in America, Mother Jones, was born in Ireland. After her husband and children died from yellow fever, she joined the labor movement. The passionate revolutionary coordinated strikes and helped found the Social Democratic Party and Industrial Workers of the World.

The original Typhoid Mary, Mary Mallon was fifteen years old when she left Ireland to cook for wealthy families in and around Manhattan. An asymptomatic carrier, Mary was the picture of health but infected scores of New Yorkers, a few of whom died. With no cure for typhoid, the health department quarantined Mary for more than twenty years. She died alone on North Brother Island.

In the tradition epic poets, Bono writes and sings tales of social injustice, poverty and politics. His band U2 has sold close to 160 million albums and won twenty-two Grammys plus a bunch of other awards. A noted humanitarian, he has met with princes and presidents and uses his celebrity to fight extreme poverty and disease.

And finally, the patron saint of Ireland, Saint Patrick was not actually Irish. A devote missionary from Britain, he traveled all over Ireland doing good works. Throughout his journey, he talked countless Irish into converting to Christianity. One other detail, he might not actually be a saint. Then again, maybe someone lost his paperwork. After all, it was a long time ago, the fifth century.

Now, to close – a toast for Saint Patrick and all the Irish –

To all the days here and after,
May they be filled with fond memories, happiness, and laughter.

Roasted Carrot Salad
Inspired by the colors of the Irish flag, sweet roasted carrots, peppery arugula and creamy goat cheese are a delicious combination. Enjoy!
Serves 8

4 large carrots, peeled and sliced on the diagonal
1 sweet onion, cut in half and then in thin wedges
Olive oil
1/4 teaspoon smoked paprika
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
1 clove garlic, minced
1/2 teaspoon finely chopped rosemary
2-3 teaspoons sherry vinegar
12 ounces arugula
4-6 ounces goat cheese, crumbled
1/2 cup chopped walnuts, toasted

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

Put the carrots and onion on a baking sheet, drizzle with enough olive oil to lightly coat, sprinkle with smoked paprika and season with salt and pepper. Toss to combine and spread the vegetables in a single layer. Roast uncovered at 400 degrees, stirring once or twice, for 15 minutes or until the vegetables are tender-crisp and lightly caramelized.

Transfer the vegetables to a bowl, sprinkle with garlic and rosemary, drizzle with sherry vinegar and toss to combine. Tossing a few times, let sit for 10-15 minutes.

Can be prepared ahead. The carrots and onion should be served warm or at room temperature.

To serve toss the arugula with enough Sherry Vinaigrette to lightly coat. Arrange the greens on a platter or individual plates, top with carrots and onion and sprinkle with goat cheese and walnuts.

Sherry Vinaigrette 1/4 cup sherry vinegar
1-2 cloves garlic
1 chunk (about 1×1 inch) red onion
1 tablespoon Dijon mustard
1 teaspoon anchovy paste
Dash hot sauce
Sea salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
1/2 cup or to taste extra virgin olive oil

Put the vinegar, garlic, onion, mustard, anchovy paste and hot sauce in a blender or small food processor, season with salt and pepper and process until very smooth.

With the motor running, slowly add olive oil to taste and continue processing until well combined.

Transfer the vinaigrette to a clean glass jar and let sit for 30 minutes. Give the vinaigrette a good shake before serving.

 

Store extra vinaigrette in the refrigerator.

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One Year Ago – Irish Lamb Stew
One Year Ago – Roasted Parsnips with Rosemary
Two Years Ago – Not-Really-Irish and Not-Really-French Potato Gratin
Three Years Ago – Zucchini Pancakes
Four Years Ago – Traditional Irish Soda Bread
Five Three Years Ago – Moroccan Chicken with Preserved Lemons
Six Years Ago – Grilled Strip Steak with Gorgonzola Sauce
Seven Years Ago – Linguine with Sundried Tomato Pesto & Roasted Eggplant
Eight Years Ago – Fettuccine with Classic Bolognese Sauce

Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!

How will you celebrate Saint Patrick’s Day? Feel free to share!

Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook. © Susan W. Nye, 2018

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