Surviving Mud Season & Vindaloo Chicken

A week ago Monday, the day dawned with about six inches of cement-like snow in the yard. Only the day before, cheery crocuses were blooming and an inch of two of daffodils had broken ground. It was a bit disheartening to say the least and I wasn’t alone in my dismay.

Everyone had a joke. Mother Nature forgot to tell Father Time it was spring. It’s not the 15th of April, it’s 106th of January. After all, if we don’t laugh we might cry. The snow did raise a few hopes. Would it put a damper on next month’s black flies? (Unfortunately no, a hard frost in May will do that but not snow in April.)

I don’t know why these April storms surprise us. Perhaps we are in denial and only pretend to be surprised. After a few decades away, I admit I more or less had forgotten about New Hampshire’s snowy Aprils. However, my return to reality was swift and sure. The last one hundred or so miles of my journey home were in a snowstorm – it was  April 22.

Let’s face it; we live in a land known for its many seasons. In late October or early November, almost-winter begins. It is followed by winter. Winter is a great time for those of us who like to ski or snowshoe. Unfortunately, around the time the lifts close, still-winter or mud season begins. Spring, for all intents and purposes, is nonexistent.

Okay, I will grudgingly admit it. Sometime in late May or early June, we are not-so-blessed with a few days of black fly infested spring. Finally, there is a wonderful burst of summer, followed by a glorious fall. As lovely as these two mini seasons are, they are just that – mini. Together they barely make up a third of the year.

When it comes to surviving mud season, here’s what I got. It ain’t much but it’s about the best I can offer:

Defy all logic and smile. Smile, even if your car gets stuck in the slush or you loose a sneaker in the mud. It’s hard to be unhappy when you are smiling. If you don’t believe me, try it. Still not convinced? Well, then leaf through a pile of old Scientific Americans; the proof is in there somewhere.

Buy a ridiculously colorful raincoat and an even brighter pair of wellies (also known as rain boots.) It’s okay if they don’t match. Both will keep you dry and make you laugh. It’s hard to be unhappy when you are laughing. (See above for proof.)

If you can, get out of town, if only for a weekend or a day. You don’t need to go all the way to the Bahamas or Hawaii for a change. Spend some time in the city – any city will do. When was the last time you visited a museum? It’s been a while hasn’t it? How about shopping and lunch in a smart café? Indulge a bit; you deserve it.

Happy mud season and bon appétit!

Vindaloo Chicken
When New Hampshire turns muddy, I have a yearning for dishes from warmer climates. Curry is one of my favorites. Enjoy!
Serves 6-8

6-8 bone-in chicken thighs
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
Vegetable oil
6-8 tablespoons Vindaloo Paste*
1 large onion, chopped
4-6 carrots, chopped
1 bay leaf
1/2 cup dry white wine
1 1/2 cups (14-15 ounce can) unsweetened coconut milk
1 cup or more chicken stock
1 pound baby spinach
1 1/2-2 cups basmati rice
1/2 cup chopped cashews, toasted

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.

Pat the chicken dry and season with salt and pepper. Heat a little oil a large, deep skillet over medium-high heat. Starting skin-side down, sear the chicken for about 2 minutes per each side. Remove the chicken from the pan and reserve.

Put the Vindaloo Paste in the pan and cook, stirring, for about 1 minute. Add the onion and carrots and cook, stirring often, until the onion is translucent. Add the bay leaf, stir in the white wine and simmer until reduced by half. Stir in the coconut milk and chicken stock and bring to a simmer.

Return the chicken to the pan with any juices and wiggle the pieces down into the vegetables.
Transfer the pan to the oven and cook, uncovered, for about 45 minutes or until the chicken is cooked-through and nicely browned. Check the pan after about 30 minutes and add more chicken stock if necessary.

While the chicken braises, cook the rice according to package directions.

Remove the chicken from the pan, arrange in a deep serving platter and cover to keep warm.

Return the skillet to the stove and place over medium-high heat. Add the spinach in handfuls, toss to coat with sauce and cook, stirring, until all the spinach has wilted, 2-3 minutes.

Spoon the vegetables and sauce around and over the chicken, sprinkle with cashews and serve with basmati rice.

* You can find Vindaloo Paste in specialty stores, online and in some larger supermarkets … or you can make your own.

Vindaloo Paste
Makes about 1 cup

1 tablespoon turmeric
1 tablespoon coriander
1 tablespoon cumin
2 teaspoons fennel seeds
1 1/2 teaspoons cardamom
1 teaspoon fenugreek seeds
1 teaspoon sea salt
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
1/4 teaspoon cloves
6 cloves garlic, peeled and roughly chopped
1 (2-inch) piece fresh ginger, peeled and roughly chopped
2-4 or to taste fresh bird’s eye chilies, chopped
1 cup loosely pack fresh cilantro
1/4 cup crushed tomatoes
About 1/4 cup vegetable oil

Put the spices and seeds in a small food processor and pulse to combine and grind the seeds.

Add the garlic, ginger, chilies and cilantro and pulse to chop and combine. Add the crushed tomatoes and process to combine.

Add the vegetable oil and process until the mixture forms a smooth paste.

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One Year Ago – I Love Lime Pie
Two Years Ago – Quinoa Salad
Three Years Ago – Latkes
Four Years Ago – Cheddar-Sage Biscuits
Five Years Ago – Peanut-y Chocolate Chip Cookies
Six Years Ago – Espresso Brownies
Seven Years Ago – Lemon Scones
Eight Years Ago – Shrimp with Jicama Slaw
Nine Years Ago – Pork Mole
Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!

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Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook. © S

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Winter Olympics Weekend Special

Uh oh, I’m feeling a little achy, my throat is a little scratchy and my nose is stuffy. With any luck, it’s a blip. Without that luck, it could be a weekend on the sofa. Thank goodness, the Olympics are on. There will be plenty to watch.

Hopefully, your immune system is holding up better than mine. After all the Olympics are a terrific excuse for a watch party and delicious dinner with friends. Buffet or around the table, you choose. Either way, here are a few ideas for a tasty Olympic feast with a bit of Asian flair:

Let’s start with a tasty appetizer, maybe two. There couldn’t be a better time to give my Savory Korean Pancakes a try. Need more? Let everyone help themselves to a beautiful platter of fresh vegetables, Roasted Shrimp and Peanut-Sesame Dipping Sauce?

Start your dinner with a lovely salad. Can I suggest – Spicy Cucumber & Radish Salad or Thai Salad.

Now, for the main course. How about a delicious combination of Hoisin Pork Ribs with Quick Braised Asian Vegetables and Dandan Noodles.

Ready for dessert? Green tea or ginger ice cream and/or fresh fruit works. If you’d like to take it up a level, you might like to try my Ginger Crème Brûlée or Fresh Berries with Creamy Lime Custard. Neither is Korean or even Asian but both are delicious!

Have a great weekend and bon appétit!

For a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog Click Here!!

What’s up with you this weekend? I’d love to hear from you! Let’s get a conversation going.

Want more? Click here for more seasonal menus!

Photo courtesy of  IOC Media © Dave Thompson/IOC. All content exclusive of IOC photo © Susan W. Nye, 2018 

Fun Facts – Winter Olympics Edition & Quick Braised Asian Vegetables

The Olympics trace their origin back to 776 BC in Olympia, Greece. The first celebration honored Zeus and featured only one athletic contest, a 600-foot run. Adding competitions along the way, the festival continued for almost twelve centuries. After a 1,503 year break, the modern Olympics debuted in Athens in 1896. Feeling a bit left out, snow and ice enthusiasts put together the first Winter Olympics in Chamonix in 1924.

A lot has changed since then. Sixteen nations competed in Chamonix; there will be ninety-two at PyeongChang. Nigeria is making history with two firsts at the Winter Olympics. Competing in the bobsled and skeleton, the team of three will be both the first Nigerians and the first women to represent Africa at a Winter Olympics. Ecuador, Eritrea, Kosovo, Malaysia and Singapore will also compete in their first Winter Games. Meanwhile, a doping scandal has banned Russia. Clean athletes can participate under the generic Olympic flag.

There will be a few new events at the PyeongChang Games taking it over the top with more than 100 medal events. When it comes to winter medals, you can’t beat Norway. In spite of its small population, just over five million people, little Norway has earned 329 winter medals. That’s more than any other country.

The estimated cost for the PyeongChang Games is a hefty $12.9 billion. Yes, that’s billion with a B. As impressive as the number is, it doesn’t compare to the cost of the Sochi Olympics, a whopping $51 billion. Only one city has had the audacity to reject the honor of hosting the Olympics. Denver won the bid for the 1976 Winter Games but, after looking at the price tag, the people of Colorado voted it down.

Athletes from the divided peninsula of North and South Korea will join forces for a joint Olympic team. They will march together under a unified flag in the opening ceremony. Athletes from both sides of the demilitarized zone will train together. The women’s hockey team will take it one step further and send a unified team out onto the ice. It is not the first time an Olympics has united a divided country. West and East Germany competed together in 1956, 1960 and 1964.

Fielding the largest winter team ever, the US is sending 242 Olympians to South Korea. These athletes hail from coast to coast and thirty-one different states. Four are from our very own New Hampshire. Four more are immigrants from Ghana, South Korea, England and Canada. The youngest member of Team USA is Vincent Zhou, one of six seventeen year olds and a figure skater. The oldest US Olympian, Brian Gionta, is still playing hockey at thirty-nine. Speaking of hockey, anyone who remembers the miracle on ice at Lake Placid in 1980, stay tuned. The National Hockey League will not break for the games so NHL players will not skate at PyeongChang.

The Olympics can be a family affair. Seven sets of US siblings will compete in PyeongChang. Twins Jocelyne and Monique Lamoureux play hockey for the US while the Brandt sisters are on different teams. Hannah is a forward for the US and Marissa plays defense for the unified Korean team. Adopted and brought to the US at four months, Marissa will play under her birth name Park Yoon-Jung. Seven more athletes are following their parent’s footsteps, including skiing great Barbara Cochran’s son Ryan. Then there is the Caldwell cross-country ski dynasty. Patrick will be at PyeongChang, his father competed in 1972, 1976, 1980 and 1984 and grandfather in 1952.

Enjoy the games! Wishing all of our athletes the joy of victory and bon appétit!

Quick Braised Asian Vegetables
A great side dish for your Olympics viewing party. Enjoy!
Serves 8

Vegetable oil
8-12 ounces mushrooms, trimmed and sliced
Sea salt and freshly ground pepper
1/2 onion, finely chopped
1 carrot, peeled and finely chopped
1-inch piece ginger, peeled and finely chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 tablespoon or to taste sriracha
2 tablespoons rice vinegar
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 tablespoon fish sauce
1 cup chicken stock
About 1 1/2 pounds bok choy, trimmed and roughly chopped
1 red bell pepper, cut in match sticks
1 tablespoon sesame oil
1-2 scallions, thinly sliced
Cilantro leaves

Lightly coat a large wok or skillet with vegetable oil and heat over medium-high. Add the mushrooms, season with salt and pepper and sauté until lightly browned. Remove from the pan and reserve.

Add a little more oil to the skillet. Add the onion and carrot and sauté until the onion is translucent. Add the ginger, garlic and sriracha and cook for 2 minutes more. Add the vinegar, soy sauce, fish sauce and chicken stock, bring to a simmer, reduce the heat and simmer for 10-15 minutes.

Raise the heat to medium-high, return the mushrooms to the pan, add the bok choy and bell pepper and toss to combine. Stirring frequently, cook until the vegetable are tender, 3-5 minutes.

Drizzle with sesame oil and toss to combine, garnish with scallions and cilantro and serve immediately.

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One Year Ago – Scrod Florentine
Two Years Ago – Lemon Risotto with Spinach & Herbs
Three Years Ago – Black Bean & Beef Chili
Four Years Ago – Coq au Vin
Five Years Ago – Crostini with Beef Tenderloin & Stilton
Six Years Ago – Flatbread with Mushrooms, Caramelized Onions & Spinach
Seven Years Ago – Lemon Cheesecake
Eight Years Ago – Pork Tenderloin with Mushrooms
Nine Years Ago – Raviolis in Broth with Meatballs & Escarole

Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!

What is your favorite winter Olympic event? Feel free to share!

Opening ceremony photography courtesy of www.olympic.org.

Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook. © Susan W. Nye, 2018

Show Me a Hero & Pa Jun – Savory Korean Pancakes

The Olympic Games are an amazing tradition. Since the first winter Olympics in Chamonix, they have been a mix of spectacle and pomp, grit and determination, joy and misery. Last week, I saw the movie I, Tonya. It’s about the Olympics and so much more. Although this dark comedy is laugh out loud funny, it is also a tragedy. Of all the Olympians who have come and gone, I’m guessing that none has more lasting name recognition than Tonya Harding and Nancy Kerrigan.

That got me to thinking. Hundreds of skiers, skaters, lugers and more have risen to the top of their game. Some have even climbed to the top of the podium while others have adorned a Wheaties box. But how many do we remember and for how long? For almost one hundred years, these stellar athletes have stirred our national pride and captured our hearts. Many hold our attention for a minute, some for a generation but few stay with us forever.

In this fast moving world, will our grandchildren and great grandchildren know the names Apollo Ohno and Shaun White? For that matter, before the movie, had we all but forgotten Tonya and Nancy?

Here are ten Olympians. How many do you recognize without sneaking a peak into Wikipedia? How many do your kids recognize?

Dick Button
Peggy Fleming
Dorothy Hamill
Eric Heiden
Charles Jewtraw
Kit Klein
Andrea Mead Lawrence
Phil Mahre
Penny Pitou
Picabo Street

At one time, these gold medalists appeared on the front page of every newspaper. They were the lead story on the evening news. Men admired them, women adored them and little girls with sparkly pink pads and pencils lined up for autographs. They were our heroes.

Show me a hero and I’ll write you a tragedy. F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote these words in one of his notebooks in 1945. I won’t bet on it but I’m thinking Tonya’s story would have baffled F. Scott. Like many of his heroes, she was from the wrong side of the tracks. Raised in an abusive home out in Oregon, she was far removed from Fitzgerald’s world of gilded New York apartments and mansions on Long Island Sound.

Tonya loved to skate and was an exceptionally fierce and unconventional competitor. Defiant of the norms, she still wanted what we all want – love, respect and … why not … recognition and acclaim. Performing a perfect triple axel in 1991, the bad girl became a hero. But not for long. She didn’t just fall, she fell hard and lost it all. Tonya was remarkable athlete, an Olympian and a US champion but in the end, she became that saddest of fates, a punchline.

Wishing you the joy of continued victory and bon appétit!

Pa Jun – Savory Korean Pancakes
A delicious nibble to enjoy while watching the Olympics!
Serves 8

Spicy Korean Dipping Sauce (recipe follows)
1 bunch scallions, thinly sliced
1 cup grated cabbage or coleslaw mix
1 carrot, grated
2 cloves garlic, minced
Sea salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
2 eggs
1/2-1 cup water
1/2 cup flour
Vegetable oil

Make the Spicy Korean Dipping Sauce (recipe follows) and set aside while you make the pancakes.

Preheat the oven to 150 degrees.

Put the vegetables in a bowl, season with salt and pepper and toss to combine.

Put the eggs and 1/2 cup water in a bowl and whisk until well combined. Add the flour and continue whisking until smooth. If necessary, add more water.

Pour the batter over the vegetables, toss to combine and let everything sit for about 10 minutes.

Lightly coat a large skillet or griddle with oil and heat over medium.

Working in batches and adding more oil as necessary, place spoonfuls (a small ice cream scoop works well) of batter onto the griddle. Fry until golden and cooked through, about 3 minutes per side. Drain the pancakes on paper towels and keep warm in a 150 degree oven.

Serve immediately with Spicy Korean Dipping Sauce.

Spicy Korean Dipping Sauce
1 clove garlic, minced
3 tablespoons soy sauce
3 tablespoon unseasoned rice vinegar
1 tablespoon fish sauce
1 teaspoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon or to taste Asian chili sauce
1/2 teaspoon or to taste toasted sesame oil

Place all the ingredients in a bowl and whisk to combine.

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One Year Ago – Spaghetti with Mushrooms & Bacon
Two Years Ago – Oven Braised Chicken with Mushrooms, Onions & Garlic
Three Years Ago – Capellini with Lobster & Caviar
Four Years Ago – Sour Cream Cupcakes with White Chocolate-Cream Cheese Frosting
Five Years Ago – White Chocolate Mousse with Raspberry Coulis & Fresh Raspberries
Six Years Ago – Mixed Greens with Roasted Beets & Lentils
Seven Years Ago – Chicken Niçoise
Eight Years Ago – Greek Pizza
Nine Years Ago – Triple Threat Brownies

Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!

What is your favorite winter Olympic event? Feel free to share!

Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook. © Susan W. Nye, 2018

Weekend Special – a Cozy Dinner in a Winter Wonderland

In the words of Mark Twain, “If you don’t like the weather in New England now, just wait a few minutes.” Over the past week or two, we enjoyed(?) a typical January. Snow. Blistering cold. Wind. Drenching rain. More wind. More cold. Snow again. Most moms are going a little crazy with all the snow days. (My only advice – push the kids out the backdoor and tell them to build a snowman, go sledding or stomp around in snowshoes.)

When the weekend comes, enjoy a great day of sledding, skiing or snowshoeing. At the end of the day, kids and adults will both enjoy an Asian inspired feast! Here are a few suggestions to warm up at the end of the day:

Warm up by the fire with a mug of Mulled Cider. If you like, add a shot of rum for the grownup, try some warm sake or open a bottle of wine. For nibbling, try my Peanut-Sesame Dipping Sauce with fresh veggies and shrimp or my Lettuce Cups with Shrimp & Noodles. (If it seems like the evening is going to be too noodle-y, Lettuce Cups with Shrimp but no Noodles will be delicious. If everyone is chilled to the bone, enjoy tiny cups of my Sweet Potato & Red Lentil Soup.

When it’s time to move to the table, start dinner with my Spicy Cucumber & Radish Salad. Next, grownups and kids alike will love my Dandan Noodles. (I’m addicted.)

For a snowy weekend dessert, what could be better than Frosty the Snowman Cupcakes? Well, how about Chocolate-Peanut Butter Tart?

Have fun, stay warm and bon appétit!

For a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog Click Here!!

How will you celebrate the New Year? I’d love to hear from you! Let’s get a conversation going.

Want more? Click here for more seasonal menus! © Susan W. Nye, 2018

The January Thaw & Dandan Noodles

Is there anything more frustrating that day after day of subzero weather? Ask any skier. You look out the window and it’s a winter wonderland of beautiful snow. Wonderland until you venture out. That’s when you realize that the bitter cold could rival Siberia. Of course, there are a lot of tough dudes and dudettes. They go out anyway but not me. I’ve been there and done that.

Now, don’t get confused here. I don’t stop exercising, I’m too much of a fanatic to quit cold turkey. You can still see me out and about walking around the lake or stomping up a hill on snowshoes. However, no way, no how, will you find me on a chairlift.

That’s not to say I haven’t tried it. I did, my first winter back in New Hampshire. It was one of the coldest Januarys on record. I figured I better get used to my new normal. Dressed like an onion, I threw my skis and boots in the car and headed for the mountain. It was awful. Not only was the temperature on the wrong side of zero but the wind gusts were so strong, I was literally stopped in my tracks. Two runs and I was out of there.

While some have tried to tempt me, I stand firm on my decision to stay close to home on the coldest days. Every time I hear about a chairlift breaking down, I know I made the right choice. Can you imagine the nightmare of being stranded midair in gale force winds and frigid temperatures? Just the thought creates uncontrollable shivers.

All that said, there is something even worse than a month of subzero temperatures. That something is the infamous January Thaw. No, that’s not a typo. It definitely thaw with a capital T. The only thing more heartbreaking than beautiful snow in bitter cold temperatures is watching it dissolve in a drenching downpour.

Not only does the January Thaw wreak havoc with the snow on the mountain, it creates a mess at home. Several years ago, I lost a porch to the Thaw. The weight of the water-drenched snow caused it to cave. On top of that, water tends to seep under the door of the garage in any heavy rain. Add melting snow and, armed with a push broom, I’m on flood watch.

Then again, the Thaw doesn’t stay long, not even a week. It tends to follow a set agenda. First, there’s the buildup. For a day, maybe two, the sun is brilliant in a bright blue sky. Still cold at night, daytime temperatures slowly inch up to maybe twenty-five. Then, there’s the tipping point. Warmer still, the skies cloud over. In spite of the thermometer’s mild reading, there is a chill dampness in the air. A foreboding fog rolls in; that’s when you know. Rain is imminent. Find the rubber boots and get out the push broom.

In less than twenty-four hours, the drenching downpour starts to taper off. Temperatures plummet as the heavy rain winds down. Roadways freeze over. Ski trails become downhill skating rinks. I don’t know about you but I start to wonder, “What did I do to deserve this? Tell me and I’ll never do it again.”

I need some serious cheering up. Bon appétit!

Dandan Noodles
Throughout the winter, frigid cold or chilly rain, I gravitate towards noodles. Far East flavors or Mediterranean flair, I love them all. Add these spicy Asian noodles to your quick supper list. Enjoy! 
Serves 4

8-12 ounces Chinese or udon noodles
Vegetable oil
1 pound ground pork
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
1/4 onion, finely chopped
1 carrot, peeled and finely chopped
1-inch ginger, peeled and finely chopped
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoons or to taste sriracha 2 tablespoons tahini or smooth peanut butter
2 tablespoons rice vinegar
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 tablespoon fish sauce
1/4 teaspoon brown sugar
1 cup chicken stock
2 teaspoons sesame oil
1/4 cup toasted sesame seeds or peanuts, toasted and finely chopped
1/4 cup thinly sliced scallions and/or cilantro

Lightly coat a large heavy skillet with vegetable oil and heat over medium-high. Add the pork, season with salt and pepper, and cook, breaking the meat up into small pieces, for about 2 minutes. Add the onion, ginger, garlic and sriracha and continue cooking until the pork is cooked through, about 5 minutes more.

Add the tahini, vinegar, soy sauce, fish sauce and sugar and stir to combine. Stir in the chicken stock, bring to a simmer, reduce the heat and simmer until the sauce thickens, 5-10 minutes.

While the pork simmers, cook the noodles according to package directions and drain well.

Transfer the noodles to a large platter or individual bowls. Stir the sesame oil to the pork. Top the noodles with pork, sprinkle with sesame seeds, scallions and/or cilantro and serve immediately.

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One Year Ago – Sweet Potato & Red Lentil Soup
Two Years Ago – Tomato Soup
Three Years Ago – Savory Galette with Spinach, Mushrooms & Manchego
Four Years Ago – Mac & Cheese with Roasted Broccoli & Sun-dried Tomatoes
Five Years Ago – Red Bean Chili with Pork & Butternut Squash
Six Years Ago – Piri Piri Prawns
Seven Years Ago – French Lentil Soup
Eight Years Ago – Spicy Chicken (or Turkey) Noodle Soup
Nine Years Ago – My Favorite Chili

Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!

How are you coping with the cold, rain, ice and snow? Feel free to share!

Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook. © Susan W. Nye, 2018

Summer Is Back Weekend Special

For anyone worried that summer was over, well, worry no more. Or at least no need to worry for at least a few more days. Even a couple of weeks. The warm weather has return and some of the humid air from down south has funneled its way north. Why, it’s almost tropical. The weekend promises to be sunny and a tad less humid.

The bounty at the farmstand is unbelievable. Add to that, the sad fact that there won’t be a lot of warm evenings left. Don’t pout, make the most of the few that are left. String some lights or set out a bunch of candles. Here are a few ideas for a tasty, end of summer feast:

Start with a glass of wine and a delicious appetizer. Something a little different like my Corn Cakes, Crostini with Red Pepper Tzatziki & Greek Salad or Summer Rolls.

Next, instead of a salad, enjoy a tasty mug of Gazpacho. The tomatoes are fabulous. I can’t get enough of them.

Make good use of the grill. What could be better than a rack or half rack Hoisin Pork Ribs . Pair the ribs with my Asian Noodle Salad and Asian Slaw or Thai Salad .

Cap your meal with a beautiful end of summer dessert. For a sweet finish, try my Fresh Berries with Creamy Lime Custard . Try the late summer strawberries – they are wonderful.

Have a great weekend and bon appétit!

For a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog Click Here!!

What’s up with you this weekend? I’d love to hear from you! Let’s get a conversation going. To make a comment, just click on Comments below.

Want more? Click here for more seasonal menus! © Susan W. Nye, 2017