Weekend Special – Coffee? Tea? Please Join Me

At a certain point, no matter how young or energetic, we all need to slow down. I think I’m rapidly approaching that point. The roller coaster of cold, thaw, rain, snow, more cold, more rain and another thaw has not helped. It’s time for a lazy morning or afternoon or both.

Call up a pal and invite him or her over for coffee or tea. Keep it simple. It’s all about the company. Light a fire, set out a basket of muffins or a plate of cookies and enjoy a good long chat. While I find baking relaxing, particularly the simple stuff like homey muffins and cookies, sometime you just want to curl up in a big armchair. So, a little hint here – a few times a year, I bake a double batch and freeze them.

Here are some of my favorite muffins –

Applesauce Muffins

Zucchini Muffins

Very Ginger Gingerbread Muffins

And some cozy cookies –

Apple Oatmeal Cookies

Peanut-y Chocolate Chip Cookies

Root ’n’ Tooty Good ’n’ Fruity Oatmeal Cookies

So brew  a pot of your favorite coffee or tea, sit back and enjoy. For a special treat, you might like to try my Spiced Chai.

Relax and bon appétit!

For a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog Click Here!!

How will you celebrate the New Year? I’d love to hear from you! Let’s get a conversation going.

Want more? Click here for more seasonal menus! © Susan W. Nye, 2018

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Snow Day & Applesauce Muffins

Who doesn’t love a good snow day? As kids, just the hint of a storm was enough to glue us to the local evening news. We were desperate to hear Don Kent proclaim a Snowmageddon. Back in the day, Don Kent was something of a local hero in the suburbs around Boston. It wasn’t so much his accuracy. I’m sure he got it right (or wrong) as often as anyone else did. It was his enthusiasm. Weather guys love weather, the bigger the better, and Don Kent loved it more than anyone.

Of course, Don Kent didn’t use the term Snowmageddon. He talked about nor’easters and snow showers. The more theatrical terms – Snowmageddon, Snowpocalypse and Snowzilla – have only finagled their way into our vocabulary in the past decade. I don’t know about Don Kent but I must say, I kind of like them. And what about the recent bomb cyclone? Certainly, the magnitude of the storm would have been excited Don Kent. I wonder if he would have embraced the colorful, new moniker or stuck with the proper term – explosive cyclogenesis.

Depending on Don Kent’s prognosis, we spent the evening peeking out the windows looking for flakes. My bedroom was well located for storm watching. My window looked out onto the streetlight on the corner. It was perfect for illuminating the falling snow or lack thereof. Throughout the evening, I bounced from homework to window. Little was accomplished and, eventually, it was time for bed. I tried to sleep but the smallest noise had me bolt upright. Was that a plow?

In the morning, Don Kent was back, this time on the radio. We figured he hadn’t slept a wink, but then, neither had I. He’d report snowfall amounts, offer the day’s forecast and finally announce the school closings. Or maybe it was his cohort Arch MacDonald who plowed through all those towns, private schools and daycare closings. Andover, Boston, Cambridge, Framingham, Humpty Dumpty Daycare, Lexington, Our Lady of the Saints, Peabody, Somerville, Watertown, Weston … wait a minute! Did he say Wellesley? He must have! I didn’t hear it.

And so, we were forced to listen to the litany all over again. Only this time a dozen or more cancellations had been added. The list went on forever, a Montessori school in Haverhill, Mother Goose Nursery School, Natick, Wayland and, finally, Wellesley. Phew!

Armed with a PC and linked to the world by the internet, snow days aren’t quite what they used to be. It doesn’t matter; I still love a snow day. It’s still dark outside when I slip into what I like to call my daytime pajamas – leggings, an old turtleneck and an even older sweater. After shoveling snow away from the garage doors and making coffee, I spend the morning doing all those things I would have done at the office. Doing it from home doesn’t change the work just the mood.

Just like a kid, I sneak constant peeks out the window at the falling snow. As the fluffy white stuff piles up outside, the world seems to slow down. Snow muffles the tread of the few cars out on the road. A sporadic plow rumbles by. It passes the house heading west. Minutes later is comes by again, this time going east. A peaceful quiet settles over the neighborhood. It will be a few hours before the plow comes by again.

Whatever needs doing gets done – lots of email, website and social media updates, a few phone calls – they know where I live, a press release and more. While still good, thanks to the internet, snow days aren’t what they used to be.

Have fun in the snow and bon appétit!

Applesauce Muffins
Baking is a great activity on a snowy day. Warm up the kitchen with the delicious aroma of apples and spice. Enjoy!
Makes about 20 muffins

2 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 teaspoon ginger
1/4 teaspoon cloves
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
1/2 cup (1 stick) butter at room temperature
1 1/4 cups brown sugar
2 large eggs
2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
3/4 cup unsweetened applesauce, preferably homemade but store-bought is okay
1/4 cup sour cream
3/4 cup raisins
3/4 cup chopped walnuts

Set the rack in the center of the oven and preheat to 375 degrees. Line muffin pans with paper liners.

Put the flour, baking powder and soda, salt and spices in a bowl and whisk to combine.

Put the butter and brown sugar in large bowl and beat with an electric mixer on high speed until fluffy. Add the eggs and vanilla and beat until smooth. Add the applesauce and sour cream and beat until smooth.

Reduce the mixer speed to low, slowly add the dry ingredients and mix until just combined. Fold in the walnuts and raisins.

Fill the muffin cups about 3/4 full with batter. A 2-ounce ice cream scoop is perfect for standard size muffins.

Slide the muffin tins into the oven, bake at 375 degrees for 5 minutes and then reduce the temperature to 350 degrees. Continue baking until the tops are golden and a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean, 15-20 minutes more.

Serve warm or at room temperature.

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One Year Ago – Chocolate-Hazelnut Bars
Two Years Ago – Whole Grain Pilaf
Three Years Ago – Tartelettes au Fromage avec Saucisse et Poireaux (Cheese Tartlets with Sausage & Leeks)
Four Years Ago – Chicken, Sausage & Bean Ragù
Fove Years Ago – Spicy Tequila Chicken Wings
Six Years Ago – Caribbean Black Beans
Seven Years Ago – Fettuccine with Escarole, Radicchio & Mushrooms
Eight Years Ago – Cassoulet
Nine Years Ago – Caribbean Fish Stew

Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!

What do while away the hours on a snow day? Feel free to share!

Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook. © Susan W. Nye, 2018

Getting Ready to Give Thanks & Cheesy Pumpkin-Sage Biscuits

I thought we had another week at least! Ten days out, it’s past time to think about Thanksgiving. Professional chef or home cook, your most important tool is between your ears. If you are hosting the harvest feast, before you do anything, think it through and make your plan. No, I don’t mean one of those la-di-da, it’s-all-in-my-head, loosey-goosey plans. Get out your pencil and write it down.

Maybe you are skeptical; you’ve been doing this for years! Maybe you are nervous; it’s your first big sit down dinner. In either case, you can’t help but ask, “Okay, what’s in this plan?” Well, truth be told, it’s nothing more and nothing less than a series of lists.

It starts with the menu. That’s right, what do you want to serve at the great feast? Will you stay with tradition and pull Nana’s menu out of your memory bank? By the way, if you let tradition rule, are you absolutely certain that you want to make that green Jell-O mold again? You know the one – with crushed pineapple, grated carrots and mini-marshmallows. Just askin’.

Then again, maybe you skimmed the latest issue of one of those foodie magazines in the checkout line at the supermarket. If so, tried and true might be looking a little done and donner. If so, it could be time to change things up – a little or a lot. Hesitating? Don’t, it will be fun.

But where to start? That’s easy, the internet of course. Type in a few key words and to search for those intriguing recipes you perused in the checkout line. If you’re more of a cookbook person, spend an hour at the kitchen table leafing through your collection. You’re bound to find something similar. Regardless of your menu, make sure it includes a good number of make-ahead dishes. You have enough to do on Thanksgiving morning without whipping up another casserole.

When it comes to Thanksgiving, don’t be shy about accepting or asking for help if you need it. At least one or two guests will probably offer to bring something. When friends or family suggest something delicious, say yes, and answer quickly before they change their minds. I was delighted when my sister-in-law volunteered to bring the pies. However, kind as friends and rellies are, not all offers are equal. (Sorry, but there will be no green bean casserole on my Thanksgiving table.) Be kind and politely suggest an alternative to the rutabaga mash or Jell-O mold or assure them you’ve got everything covered.

Back to the grand plan, add whatever potluck offerings to your menu and adjust accordingly. If your cousin is bringing the aforementioned green bean casserole (hey, it’s your party not mine) then you can skip the broccoli gratin. Unless you are hosting a cast of thousands, you don’t need two kinds of yams, roasted and mashed potatoes and five or six different green and/or yellow vegetables.

With your menu done, use it to create your shopping list. Go through each recipe and your pantry and then write down any and everything you need to create your wonderful feast. Don’t forget to add the wine, cider, flowers and whatever else you might need.

Finally, create your to-do list and make a time line. Remember those make-ahead dishes? Figure out when you will make them plus set the table and run the vacuum cleaner around the living room. Be realistic about time. Whether it’s peeling the potatoes or finding the turkey platter, don’t let optimism get in the way of reality. It will take longer than think. By all means, enlist help. Remember those that can’t cook can run errands and the vacuum cleaner.

Wishing you good luck and fun with your Turkey Day preparations and bon appétit!

Cheesy Pumpkin- Sage Biscuits
Pass these versatile biscuits before dinner for a tasty appetizer or serve them with the main course. Bake up another batch over the weekend for extra special turkey sandwiches. Enjoy!

Makes about 2 dozen dinner biscuits or 8 dozen minis*

4 cups all-purpose flour
2 1/2 tablespoons baking powder
2 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon cumin
1/2 teaspoon or to taste chipotle chili powder
1 cup (2 sticks) butter, cut in small pieces
1 1/2 cups (about 6 ounces) grated sharp cheddar cheese
3 tablespoons chopped fresh sage
1 1/2 cups pumpkin purée
1/2 cup sour cream
1 tablespoon maple syrup
Cream or melted butter

Position the racks in the top and bottom third of the oven and preheat to 425 degrees. Line baking sheets with parchment paper or a silicon mat.

Put the flour, baking powder, salt and spices in the bowl of a food processor and pulse to combine.

Add the butter and pulse until the dough resembles coarse meal. Add the cheddar and sage and pulse to combine. Transfer the dough to a bowl.

Put the pumpkin, sour cream and maple syrup in a bowl and whisk to combine. Add the wet ingredients to the dough and stir to combine. If necessary, add an extra tablespoon or two of sour cream.

Divide and pat the dough into 2 balls, place on a lightly floured work surface and shape each piece into rectangle about 9×12-inches and about 3/4-inch thick. Cut the biscuits into 3-inch* squares and place them on the prepared baking sheets.

Brush the top of each biscuit with cream or melted butter and bake at 425 until golden, about 15 minutes. Remove the biscuits from the oven, cool for 5-10 minutes and serve warm.

* For tasty appetizers, cut the biscuits into 1 1/2-inch squares and reduce the baking time.

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One Year Ago – Butternut Squash Tartlets
Two Years Ago – Lemony Kale & Radicchio Salad
Three Years Ago – Wild Rice & Mushroom Stuffing
Four Years Ago – Sweet Potato & Goat Cheese Crostini
Five Years Ago – Pumpkin Cheesecake
Six Years Ago – Rustic Apple Croustade
Seven Years Ago – Cranberry Sauce
Eight Years Ago – Decadent Cheesy Potatoes
Nine Years Ago – Broccoli Puree
Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!

Are you ready for the next power outage? What are secret survival tricks? Feel free to share!

Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook. © Susan W. Nye, 2017

Take a Deep Breath & Zucchini Muffins

It’s not been an easy summer. After a couple of years of drought, what is probably more or less normal seems like constant rain. I have a friend who has tried to come up from Boston a handful of times this summer. Her best-laid plan calls for nine holes of golf with my dad followed by dinner with me. She recently pointed out that rain has thwarted her plan not once but again and again and again. Along with broken golf dates, more than a few cookouts have been rained out. Not to mention poor little me, I’ve been drenched on several of my early morning walks.

However, lawns and gardens have never looked better and until it’s time to build an ark or our tourist economy goes to hell in a handbasket, all this rain falls under the category of small stuff. Most of the big stuff is happening outside of New Hampshire. However, our rarefied air and beautiful lakes and mountains don’t provide immunity from the gnarly stuff that happens elsewhere. We still feel the consequences.

So, what should we do when our values are assaulted and our overactive brains have been filled with angst and tragedy? I have a pretty simple idea. I don’t know if it will work, but here goes. Take a day, an hour or just a long pause to slow down and take a deep breath.

Take a deep breath and slide into an Adirondack chair. There is nothing like an Adirondack chair. Having spent at least three days scrubbing and re-staining mine, I deserve to sit. I’d like to add a good book and a very good cup of coffee. My hope is to stay put for an entire morning, only getting up for a fresh cup.

Take a deep breath and put your hand on your heart. My sister Brenda taught pre-school for years. Without fail every year, at least a child or two or three would be especially nervous about leaving mom every morning. Brenda’s advice was for everyone to hold their mother’s hand as they walked into school. When a little one began to feel anxious or sad, Brenda would prompt that boy or girl to remember holding mummy’s hand. Next, she would urge them to put their hand on their heart.

Throughout your day, your week, your life, take hold of your loved ones’ hands. Reach out to your spouse, your mom, your dad, children, sister, brother, friends and cousins. Then, whenever you feel a little anxious or sad or just need some comfort, put your hand on your heart. It works.

Take a deep breath and smile. If you are like me, you have a knack for visiting the supermarket when the lines are longest. Whether its long lines or some other first world problem, there is nothing like smiling to change your perspective. After all, it’s only a supermarket line. Besides, the summer people won’t be here all that much longer. Before you know it, they’ll be headed home to the suburbs and big cities where the lines are always long.

Take a deep breath and sit by the lake at sunset. I want to take it all in; the changing colors of the lake and sky, the honking geese flying overhead and the loons swimming by. I want to embrace the tranquility and enjoy a quiet evening.

Take a deep breath and maybe, just maybe, the headache that’s been following me around for days will finally leave me alone.

Wishing you peace and bon appétit!

Zucchini Muffins
A zucchini muffin will be a welcome addition to that book and cup of coffee. Enjoy!
Makes about 2 dozen muffins

3 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1/4 teaspoon ground cloves
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
2 large eggs
2/3 cup brown sugar
2/3 cup canola oil
2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
3 cups grated fresh zucchini
1 cup chopped walnuts, toasted
1 cup raisins

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Line muffin pans with paper liners.

Put the flour, baking powder and soda, salt and spices in a bowl and whisk to combine. Set aside.

Put the eggs, brown sugar, oil and vanilla in a bowl and, with an electric mixer on medium speed, beat for 2 minutes. Reduce the mixer speed to low, slowly add the dry ingredients and beat until just combined. Using a rubber spatula, fold the zucchini, walnuts and raisins into the batter.

Fill the muffin cups about 3/4 full with batter. A 2-ounce ice cream scoop is perfect for standard size muffin cups.

Slide the muffin tins into the oven, bake at 375 degrees for about 5 minutes and then reduce the temperature to 350 degrees. Continue baking until the tops are golden and a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean, about 20 minutes more.

Serve warm or at room temperature.

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One Year Ago – Berry Peachy Crisp
Two Years Ago – Spicy Refrigerator Pickles
Three Years Ago – Double Trouble Chocolate-Oragne Cupcakes
Four Years Ago – Roasted Beets with Goat Cheese Salad
Five Years Ago – Blueberry Soup with Mascarpone Cream
Six Years Ago – Grilled Corn, Black Bean & Avocado Salsa
Seven Years Ago – Crostini with Goat Cheese
Eight Years Ago – Corn & Chicken Chowder
Nine Years Ago – Joe Nye’s Perfect Lobster

Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!

What about you? What do you love about late summer? Feel free to share!

Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook. © Susan W. Nye, 2017

Merry Christmas Vacation & Sticky Buns

King_RidgeHow could we have been so lucky? I don’t know how it happened (maybe it didn’t). When we were kids, we didn’t have to dream it, EVERY Christmas was white. By mid-December, the snow would start to fly. All rain and even the threat of a thaw were postponed until mid-to-late January.

Our winter wonderland made Santa’s job easy. From one year to the next, there was always some combination of Flexible Flyers, Flying Saucers, ice skates and skis under the tree. Oh and by the way, the Flying Saucers were not filled with little green men and did not whirl high overhead like a drone. They were aluminum disks that were perfect for flying down a hill at top speed. Flexible Flyers were made for hard packed, icy snow. Flying Saucers were made for the fluffy stuff.

Christmas vacations were filled with outdoor fun. There were plenty of little hills for sliding on Jackson Road. If we felt more ambitious, the country club was less than a mile away. Longfellow Pond was at the end of the street for skating.

Then, our already more than satisfactory Christmas vacations improved at least tenfold. Mom and Dad built a little brown house in the New Hampshire woods. After that, we spent all of our Christmas vacations whizzing up and down the slopes at King Ridge.

For the sake of our grandparents, we continued to celebrate Christmas Eve and Day in suburbia but we couldn’t get out of town fast enough. In the beginning, we headed north the day after Christmas. Then, we realized that most grandparents, including ours, don’t like to drive after dark. So, we’d have Christmas dinner at noon and they’d be out the door by two, maybe three o’clock. One year, I think they were barely out of the driveway before we were in our big blue station wagon and heading north.

King Ridge was a wonderful place for families. While it admittedly lacked vertical challenge, it made up for it with homey charm. Parents liked it because it was almost impossible to lose your kids. I’m sure a few kids managed to slip away for an hour or two but it took some doing. You couldn’t turn around without bumping into your mom or dad or one of your friends’ parents.

Kids liked King Ridge in spite of the ever-present village of adults. Ever-present, ever-vigilant and ever-ready to keep us from doing anything fun or stupid. Whether our actions were fun or stupid depended entirely on your perspective. If Mom and Dad were within eyeshot, we diplomatically agreed that jump was dangerous and bushwhacking through the woods was a bad idea. But as soon as they turned their backs, well, let’s just say that a kid’s gotta do what a kid’s gotta do.

Besides, you didn’t have to be a kid to do something silly. Take, just for-instance, the time our friends the McCauleys came up from Connecticut. Skip was a teenager and was delighted to have a few ski lessons. Dad was just as delighted to teach him. An athletic kid, Skip made amazing progress, deftly getting from top to bottom in one piece. As for Dad, he was not so deft.

Sometime, around mid-morning on the second or maybe third day of the McCauley’s visit, Skip passed Dad and joined us about three-quarters of the way down the hill. Showing off, Dad swooped down with plans for a dramatic stop and a magnificent rooster tail of light fluffy snow. Rather than dowse his friends and family, he pitched over … and broke his leg.

It looks like we’ll have a beautiful white Christmas this year. Have a safe holiday and bon appétit!

Sticky Buns
A special, old-fashioned treat for Christmas breakfast or any morning during the holiday week. Bakers will want to use their favorite white bread dough. If you’re not a baker, feel free to cheat with frozen dough. Either way, enjoy!
Makes 12-16 bunssticky_buns_02

3-5 tablespoons butter at room temperature
1/4 cup brown sugar
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
1/4 cup pecans or walnuts, toasted and coarsely chopped
1/4 cup currants
About 1 pound of your favorite homemade white bread dough or frozen, store-bought dough, thawed
Creamy Icing (recipe follows)

Generously butter the bottom and sides of an 8×8-inch or 8×10-inch baking dish.

Put the brown sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves in a bowl and stir to combine. Add the nuts and currants and toss to combine.

If using homemade bread dough, follow your recipe through the first rise.

Roll out the dough on a lightly floured surface into a 16×6-inch rectangle. Leaving a 1/2-inch border along one long side, generously butter the dough. Evenly sprinkle the sugar mixture over the dough.

Roll up the dough, jelly-roll style, forming a 16-inch long log and pinch the seam to seal. Cut the log into 12 or 16 equal pieces. Spacing them evenly, arrange the buns, cut side down, in the baking dish.

Cover the dish with plastic wrap and transfer to the refrigerator for a slow rise, 8-12 hours or overnight. (If you’re in a hurry, let the buns rise in a warm area until puffed, about 45 minutes.)

Position the rack in the center of the oven and preheat to 350 degrees.

Bake uncovered until the tops are golden, about 20 minutes. Cool for 5-10 minutes and drizzle with Creamy Icing. Serve warm.

Creamy Icing
2 ounces cream cheese at room temperature
About 1 cup powdered sugar, sifted
2 or more tablespoons sour cream
1 tablespoon maple syrup
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

With an electric mixer, beat the cream cheese until fluffy; slowly add the powdered sugar and continue beating until well combined. Add the sour cream, maple syrup and vanilla and beat until smooth and creamy. If necessary, add more sour cream until the icing is perfect for a nice, thick drizzle.

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One Year Ago – Cranberry Coffee Cake
Two Years Ago – Fish Stew Provençal
Three Years Ago – Twice-Baked Potatoes
Four Years Ago – Baked French ToastFive Years Ago – Braised Lamb with Artichokes and Mushrooms and Creamy Polenta
Six Years Ago – Beef Tenderloin with Red Wine Mushroom Sauce
Seven Years Ago – Potato, Leek & Kale Soup
Eight Years Ago – Salmon & Lentils

Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!

What about you? How will you spend the week between Christmas and New Year? Feel free to share!

Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook. © Susan W. Nye, 2016

‘Tis the Season for Taxes & Lavender Scones

taxes_04What can I say? The sky is the color of dirty snow. One last pile of dirty snow still clings to the edge of the driveway. Rain is not just in the forecast; it is imminent. Step outside and it feels like your thermometer is off by at least five degrees. Could it get any worse? Yes, of course, our taxes are due next Monday. (No, that’s not a typo. April 15th is a holiday in Washington so the deadline has been pushed back.)

While paying taxes is no picnic, filing is even worse. I assume that there are people who embrace the process as a fascinating puzzle or mystery to unravel. Not I. Running through all those numbers is pure drudge. I suppose that if I was a clever accountant, I would appreciate the finesse and creativity it takes to master the tax code. But I’m not. I’m just an ordinary person with a mountain of forms and receipts and a not-quite-as-easy-as-advertised software package to navigate. Don’t get me wrong, I’m certainly not complaining about the software. For years I did my taxes with a calculator and pencil, this way is much, much better.

I’m not alone. None other than Albert Einstein said, “The hardest thing in the world to understand is the income tax.” If the dreaded tax season has you down, here are a few quotes to perk you up. If you like, you can use them to make refrigerator magnets. (You can sell the magnets to help pay your tax bill. Don’t forget to include your sales as miscellaneous income next year.)

Perhaps these lines will cheer you up, perhaps not. Anyway, here goes:

“No taxation without representation” was a popular slogan during the mid-1700s. The quote summarized the American colonists’ primary grievance against Mad King George. The notion of taxes without a voice in government led to the American Revolution. We have since learned that taxation with representation isn’t all that much fun either.

Benjamin Franklin shared the rather distressing truth that, “nothing is certain except death and taxes.” However, he failed to add that if you are hard pressed for time, the IRS will give you an extension. You just need to ask.

Too bad Richard Nixon didn’t heed his own words, “Make sure you pay your taxes; otherwise you can get in a lot of trouble.” The Watergate scandal, political corruption, dirty tricks and, yes, tax evasion landed Nixon in a whole heap of trouble and forced him to resign. Charges were not restricted to the president. Pleading no contest to tax evasion, Veep Spiro Agnew left office in disgrace ten months before Nixon stepped down.

Nixon and Agnew are not alone. Perhaps Leona Helmsley summed it up best, “We don’t pay taxes. Only the little people pay taxes.” That was before the Queen of Mean was sentenced to four years in prison and fined $7 million for tax fraud. Al Capone must have been similarly deluded when he said, “They can’t collect legal taxes from illegal money.”

I guess Barry Goldwater knew what he was talking about when he said, “The income tax created more criminals than any other single act of government.” Will Rogers didn’t go quite so far. His take on our annual calculations and filing was, “The income tax has made more liars out of the American people than golf has.”

If your W-2 and myriad of other forms are signed and sent, well, good for you. If you are still busy calculating; my sympathies and best wishes.

Either way, with any luck, you’re due a refund. Bon appétit!

Lavender Scones
After your taxes are filed, clear your head of convoluted instructions and calculations with a leisurely cup of tea and a scone. Enjoy!
Makes 16 scones

3 cups all-purpose flour plus more for your work surface
3/4 cup brown sugar
1 tablespoon dried lavender buds
Grated zest of 1 lemon
1 tablespoon baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
3/4 cup (1 1/2 sticks) cold butter, cut into small pieces
1 cup sour cream
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
2 tablespoons heavy cream
Lavender Honey Butter, recipe follows

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Line 2 baking sheets with non-stick silicon mats or parchment paper.

Put the flour, sugar, lavender, lemon zest, baking powder, salt and baking soda in the bowl of a food processor and pulse to combine. Add the butter and pulse until the mixture resembles coarse meal. Transfer the buttery flour mixture to a bowl.

Stir the vanilla into the sour cream and then add the wet ingredients to the buttery flour mixture. Stir to combine.

tea_scones_04Transfer the dough to a lightly floured surface, pat together and knead for 10 or 12 turns. Pat the dough into a 10×5-inch rectangle. Cut the dough in half lengthwise and then cut each half into 4 squares. Cut each square diagonally into 2 triangles.

Arrange the scones on the baking sheets and brush the tops with cream. Bake the scones at 400 degrees for 15-20 minutes or until golden. A tester inserted into the center of one of the scones should come out clean. Transfer to a wire rack to cool for a few minutes. Serve warm with honey butter.

Can be made ahead and reheated in a 350 degree oven for 5 minutes.

Lavender Honey Butter
2 tablespoons lavender* honey
2 teaspoons lemon zest
1 teaspoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
8 ounces (2 sticks) butter, softened and cut in 1-inch pieces

Put the honey, lemon zest and juice in a bowl and beat with an electric mixer on medium speed to combine. Add the butter and beat on low speed to break up the butter and begin mixing. Gradually increase the speed to medium-high and beat until well combined, about 5 minutes.

Spoon the butter onto parchment paper or plastic wrap, roll into a log and refrigerate for at least 1 hour.

* Don’t worry if you can’t find lavender honey. Your favorite honey should work almost as well.

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One Year Ago – Calzones with Marinara Sauce
Two Years Ago – Chocolate-Espresso Cheesecake
Three Years Ago – Runners’ Chicken with Pasta
Four Years Ago – Steamed Artichokes with Bagna Cauda or Warm Lemon-Garlic Sauce
Five Years Ago – Death by Chocolate Cake
Six Years Ago – Filet de Perche Meunière
Seven Years Ago – Chicken Provençal
Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!

Yippee! I finished my taxes yesterday afternoon. How are doing with your calculations? Feel free to share!

Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook. © Susan W. Nye, 2016

Countdown to Christmas & Cranberry Coffee Cake

evergreen_basketThree days! Yes, there are only three days until Christmas. I don’t know about you but it has sort of caught me unawares. Yes, I’ve seen all the signs. The Christmas lights twinkle on Main Street. There are rows of evergreens at the farm stand. The barrage of holiday ads is relentless. The only thing missing is the cold and fluffy white stuff.

Who dreams of a green Christmas? Not me. At least for this New England girl, it’s hard to get in the spirit when it feels more like April than December. One excuse is as lame as another so I blame this year’s somewhat tenuous grasp of the holiday spirit on El Niño. I guess it is only fitting that this meteorological phenomenon arrives in the weeks leading up to Christmas. El Niño means the boy in Spanish and refers to the birth of Christ.

But what the heck; we’ve had green Christmases in the past and we’ll have them again in the future. It’s time to pull myself together. Anyway, the last few days before Christmas are really the best! With no time to spare, I’m making my final lists and checking them twice.

One last decoration? Looking around the house, there might be a few spots still shouting for attention. Nothing over the top mind you, just an additional bowl (or three) filled with greens or shiny ornaments. Do I need another wreath? (If you have to ask, the answer is probably yes.) The stockings are somewhere but where. And, didn’t I already get mistletoe?

Last minute shopping. Whether it’s special ingredients for the holiday feast, stocking stuffers or that impossible-to-buy-for rellie, there is always at least one last mad dash around town. I don’t mind; it only adds to the excitement. The shops bustle with activity and everyone smiles.

Wrapping. I rarely, maybe never, wrap as I buy. A day, maybe two, before Santa climbs down the chimney, I get into gear. First, I crank up the Christmas music or tune into It’s a Wonderful Life. Then, I take an assortment of fancy paper, bags and bows and turn plain packages into presents. I confess to using gift bags whenever possible but there are always a few present that require scissors, tape and wrapping paper.

Cooking with the girlies. The twirling girlies are not so little anymore. All three are taller than their auntie. Two are away from home and living on their own. Lucky for me, they have discovered that they like to cook. Emily played sous to my chef at Thanksgiving. Kaela has signed on to help with Christmas Eve dinner. I suspect Emily will join us. A good thing, since I may want to add a coffee cake for Christmas morning to my to-do list.

Rein it in. I’ve been known to go a bit nuts in the last day or two before Christmas. One year it was pinecone wreaths and mini-trees. Another time it was scarves. (I was still knitting at midnight on Christmas Eve.) Who knows what holiday treat will try to tempt me this year. It might be difficult but, with only three days to go, I’ll do my best to resist the urge to make dozens of lavender sachets, turn tiles into coasters or bake a gingerbread village.

Have a wonderful holiday! Bon appétit!

Cranberry Coffee Cake
What could be better on Christmas morning that a sweet and tangy coffee cake? Enjoy!
Serves 8

6 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature, plus more for the pan
1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour, plus more for the pan
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder


1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon cardamom
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon allspice
Grated zest of 1 orange
1 cup brown sugar
1 large egg
2/3 cup sour cream
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1 cup fresh or frozen (do not defrost) cranberries
Crumbly Nut Topping (recipe follows)

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Butter a 9-inch springform pan, line the pan with parchment paper, butter the paper, dust with flour and tap out any excess.

Put the flour, baking powder and spices in a bowl and whisk to combine. Add the orange zest and whisk again. Set aside.

Put the butter and sugar in a bowl and beat with an electric mixer until fluffy, about 3 minutes. Add the egg, sour cream and vanilla and beat until smooth. With the mixer on low, gradually add the dry ingredients. Increase the mixer speed to medium and beat until just smooth. Do not overbeat.

Pour the batter into the prepared pan and smooth the top. Sprinkle first with the cranberries and then with the Crumbly Topping.

Bake the cake for 10 minutes at 350 degrees. Reduce the oven temperature to 325 degrees and bake until the cake is golden and a tester inserted in the center comes out clean, about 45 minutes. Cool the cake in the pan on a rack for 10-15 minutes. Remove the springform collar and continue to cool. The coffee cake can be baked ahead and stored, loosely covered, at room temperature overnight.

Crumbly Nut Topping
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
6 tablespoons brown sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon cardamom
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
Pinch allspice
3 tablespoons cold, unsalted butter, cut in pieces
1/2 cup roughly chopped pecans or walnuts

Put the flour, sugar and spices in a small food processor and pulse to combine. Add the butter and pulse until the topping comes together in lumps. Add the pecans and pulse once or twice to distribute the nuts evenly in the topping.

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One Year Ago – Fish Stew Provençal
Two Years Ago – Twice-Baked Potatoes
Three Years Ago – Baked French Toast
Four Years Ago – Braised Lamb with Artichokes and Mushrooms and Creamy Polenta
Five Years Ago – Beef Tenderloin with Red Wine Mushroom Sauce
Six Years Ago – Potato, Leek & Kale Soup
Seven Years Ago – Salmon & Lentils

Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!

What about you? How do you get in the holiday spirit? Feel free to share!

Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook. © Susan W. Nye, 2015