Enough Is Enough & Grilled Swordfish with Corn, Tomato & Avocado Salsa

About a month ago, drought warnings were all over the news. The gardens were looking thirsty and the lawns parched. It seemed like we were only minutes away from an outdoor watering ban. On the other hand, we were happily walking, running, hiking, biking, playing tennis, golfing, swimming, waterskiing, paddling and sailing. Now, we’re stuck in the house and all we hear is one flood warning after another.

As soon as we think the weather is going to change for the better – it doesn’t. For a while there, all the gardeners were giving us glass-half-full platitudes. Mind you, these oh-be-joyfuls were happy to join our rants about the oppressive humidity. Then, they’d shrug and say, “Well, at least the gardens are happy.”

Okay, enough already with the happy gardens. The steamy weather is doing nothing to help me maintain a sunny disposition.

Let’s turn our collective energy towards sunny days and clear nights. Some psychologists call it magical thinking. If you’ve not heard about magical thinking, it’s when the sheer force of thinking or wishing something makes it happen. Some might try to call it karma but it’s more akin to thinking is reality. If you think it; it will happen.

Consider this current situation, back in July every gardener in New England was shaking her fist at the sky and crying out for rain. The town was threatening a water ban. Obviously, someone heard all the wailing and threats, turned on the faucets and, then, forgot to turn them off.

Hello? Are you still there? It’s okay, we’ve had enough for now. Please? If for no other reason than each and every curly headed woman and girl in New England is about to go out of her mind. We can take only so many bad hair days … in a row.

Until these new pleas are heard, how about a little good news to cheer us up:

For sports fans, the football preseason has started but, more important, the Red Sox are on winning streak. With six weeks to go, the Sox might even break the record for the winningest season ever. With a .705 wins percentage, they are now tied with the 1897 Boston Beaneaters for ninth place. The 1906 Chicago Cubs claim the number one spot with a .763.

My nieces are coming for a visit. Not all at once but the four will have breezed in and out of town at least once before Halloween. (Yes, one isn’t coming until October but I’m grabbing at straws here. The humidity has left me with mush for brains.)

Finally, forget sports and my family’s good fortune. Somewhere close by and far away, a bunch of people are doing something nice, not because they have to but because they want to. Somewhere a teenager is running out of gas in the middle of nowhere. He’ll be rescued by some nice lady. Meanwhile, an older gent is helping some mom load groceries in trunk so she can buckle in her two rambunctious children. Later today, once it cools off a bit, someone will mow an elderly neighbor’s lawn. And more, a lot more, because, as we all know, there can never be enough kindness.

Stay cheerful and bon appétit!

Grilled Swordfish with Corn, Tomato & Avocado Salsa
Last week, the woman at the farmstand told me the corn is loving the steamy weather. Enjoy!
Serves 8

Juice of 1 lime
1-3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tablespoon or to taste minced jalapeno
2 teaspoons cumin
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
Sea salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
6-8 ears corn, shucked
Olive oil
2 pints cherry tomatoes in a mix of colors, quartered
2 avocados, peeled, seeded and chopped
3-4 scallions, thinly sliced
1/4 cup roughly chopped cilantro leaves
2-2 1/2 pounds Swordfish steak

Put the juice of 1/2 lime, 1-2 cloves minced garlic, 1 tablespoon jalapeno, 1 teaspoon cumin and the extra virgin olive oil, in a large bowl, season with salt and whisk to combine. Let sit for 10 minutes to combine the flavors.

Preheat the grill to high.

Brush the corn with a little olive oil. Lay the ears directly on the grill and cook for about 6 minutes, turning to cook evenly. Remove from the grill and when they are cool enough to handle, use a sharp knife to remove the kernels from the cobs.

Put the corn, tomatoes, avocados and scallions in the bowl with the lime juice mixture and toss to combine. Add the cilantro and toss again.

Put the remaining lime juice, garlic, jalapeno and cumin in a bowl, add 2 tablespoons olive oil, season with salt and pepper and whisk to combine. Coat both sides of the swordfish with the marinade and let it sit for about 5 minutes.

Place the swordfish steaks on grill and, depending on thickness, cook for 6-8 minutes, turn and cook an additional 3-5 minutes. Remove the swordfish from the grill and let it rest for about 5 minutes. Cut the swordfish into 1-inch slices.

To serve – place a generous dollop of salsa on each plate and top with swordfish.

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One Year Ago – Zucchini Muffins
Two Years Ago – Berry Peachy Crisp
Three Years Ago – Spicy Refrigerator Pickles
Four Years Ago – Double Trouble Chocolate-Orange Cupcakes
Five Years Ago – Roasted Beets with Goat Cheese Salad
Six Years Ago – Blueberry Soup with Mascarpone Cream
Seven Years Ago – Grilled Corn, Black Bean & Avocado Salsa
Eight Years Ago – Crostini with Goat Cheese
Nine Years Ago – Corn & Chicken Chowder
Ten Years Ago – Joe Nye’s Perfect Lobster

Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!

Were you a free-range kid? Where was your favorite place to roam? Feel free to share!

Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook. © Susan W. Nye, 2018

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Free-Range Rambling & Roasted Tomato-Chipotle Ketchup

Summer is a special time in New England. Long days and warm weather invite children to explore the world or at least the patch outside their backdoor … and out into the neighborhood. Unencumbered by jackets and boots, children are free to ride bikes, climb trees and ramble through the woods.

There’s a good bet that more than one child will bring home a nasty case of poison ivy and another will slip and slide into the frog pond. There will be scraped knees and possibly a broken bone or two. It’s all part of growing up in the country. Now, if you are concerned about these bumps, and scrapes; don’t be. Yes, there will be tears but they never last long. Besides, each scar will be a wonderful reminder of a fabulous adventure. They are badges of fun, bravery and honor. My generation continues to wear those scars with pride; this generation of kids will too.

In today’s lingo, children who wander about, seeking and finding their own entertainment are called free-range kids. It’s how I grew up. You probably grew up the same way. In our day, we were just called kids. Now, perhaps you’ve wondered, where can these free-range kids roam? If they live in my neighborhood, there is plenty to explore. A hike in the woods will lead them to the remnants of old stone walls, massive boulders and ancient orchards. Every child needs a favorite rock or tree to climb, a special perch to contemplate the world and all its ambiguities.

Most children are collectors. If they weren’t, tiny cars, cuddly stuffed animals, dolls and action figures would not fill toy baskets or get lost at the beach. Rambling young collectors will find a multitude of treasures to fill their pockets. Pinecones, sticks, bits of bark, stones, wild flowers, ferns and what not – there are loads of interesting finds.

But don’t worry. All that flotsam and jetsam will not clutter up the house. Those bits and twigs won’t join the already overflowing baskets of toys. They won’t even cross the threshold. Children know better than anyone that nature’s collectibles are exactly what’s needed to build fairy houses.

Least you think otherwise, free-range kids aren’t constantly on the move. Every child seeks a quiet corner from time to time. Everyone is different: some children need a lot of alone space while others are good with just a little. Even the most enthusiastic ramblers want a break now and then – to read, draw or take a nap. One of the many delights of summer is the freedom to enjoy a book that’s not on the reading list or write your own stories. Without a tightly regimented schedule, kids can explore new music, color and line, arts and crafts. Perhaps they’ll invent a new game or create a new dance.

Now, this practice of raising free-range children is not particularly well appreciated in some circles. I find this both astounding and sad. Why would anyone deny their children the fun and freedom they themselves enjoyed as kids?

So … Mommas and Poppas, do let your children go out and play cowboys. Let them be pirates, ballerinas and such. Let them ramble and wander and gaze at the stars. Encourage them to read, sing and draw. Most of all inspire them to dream. Summer may be short but childhood is even shorter; embrace the freedom to make the most of both.

Have fun and bon appétit!

Roasted Tomato-Chipotle Ketchup
Summertime is burger time; make yours special with spicy homemade ketchup. Enjoy!
Makes about 2 cups

1 pound cherry tomatoes
1/2 sweet onion, chopped
3 cloves garlic
1 tablespoon or to taste pureed chipotle in adobo*
1-2 tablespoons olive oil
1-2 tablespoons cider vinegar
1 tablespoon or to taste brown sugar
1 teaspoon cumin
1/2 teaspoon smoked paprika
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
Juice of 1/2-1 lime

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.

Put the tomatoes, onion, garlic and chipotle purée in a large ovenproof skillet or roasting pan, drizzle with olive oil and vinegar and toss to combine. Sprinkle with brown sugar, cumin and paprika, season with salt and pepper and toss again.

Roast for about 30 minutes or until the vegetables are soft and caramelized. Remove from the oven and cool in the pan for 15-20 minutes. Transfer the vegetables to a small food processor or blender, add the lime juice and process until very smooth.

* Take a can of chipotle peppers in adobo sauce and toss them, sauce and all, in a small food processor. Process until smooth and transfer to a clean glass jar. Store the chipotle purée in the refrigerator and use as needed.

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One Year Ago – Grilled Zucchini & Feta Salad with Lemony Vinaigrette
Two Years Ago – Fresh Tomato Crostini
Three Years Ago – Spicy Cucumber & Radish Salad
Four Years Ago – Watermelon Sorbet
Five Years Ago – Caramel Sundaes with Sweet & Salty Pecans
Six Years Ago – Gazpacho
Seven Years Ago – Mousse au Citron
Eight Years Ago– Thai Salad
Nine Years Ago – Sweet Dream Bars
Ten Years Ago – Lobster Salad

Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!

Were you a free-range kid? What was your favorite place to roam? Feel free to share!

Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook. © Susan W. Nye, 2018

Taco Saturday – Another Weekend Special

I’ve got a couple of busy days writing this weekend. That said, I think I owe someone a dinner so I may need to get out the grill on Saturday. What about you? While I figure out IF I’ll be cooking this weekend, here are a few dishes you and your friends might enjoy this weekend …

It may not be Tuesday but what about tacos?

To start, let everyone sit and relax with a glass of wine and maybe some… Corncakes? Want something a little simpler? How about my Guacamole & Simple Salsa or Watermelon & Cucumber Salsa.

All right, what’s next? Soup or salad? The solstice is still a few weeks away but it’s not too early to serve one of my favorite summer salads. I promise, you will love my Grilled Romaine Salad.

Now for the tacos … I’ve got two suggestions: Grilled Shrimp Tacos and Grilled Zucchini Tacos. You’ve got the grill going, why not serve them both.

Now, top it all off with a sweet treat. What could be better than a little spice and more chocolate in my Mexican Chocolate Pot de Crème or my oh so rich Espresso Brownies.

Have a great weekend and bon appétit!

For a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog Click Here!!

What’s up with you this weekend? I’d love to hear from you! Let’s get a conversation going.

Want more? Click here for more seasonal menus! © Susan W. Nye, 2018

End of School Days & Grilled Zucchini Tacos

As we roll into June, the end is in sight. Ah, I remember it well, those last few weeks of hell. Literally and figuratively, that last month of school is a tough one. If you need any proof, check out the local preschools. Most of them closed at the end of last week. They get it.

With each passing day, temperatures steadily climb and those lumbering brick buildings heat up. The windows may be open wide but, by mid-June, the air is nothing short of oppressive. Some teachers close the blinds; then it’s both hot and stuffy. Toss in some of our famous northeast humidity and the entire school feels a gym locker room. By Friday, it smells like a locker room as well. However, since we live in the northern New England, no one but no one would or should even think about investing in air conditioning. As a taxpayer, I stand firmly behind this long omission. Let the kids sweat. We did.

As bad as those hot, dank classrooms and hallways are, the end of the year cram might be even worse. Who doesn’t remember the day your European history teacher suddenly realized there were only three weeks to the final bell? There you were, smack in the middle of the complexities of the Napoleonic Wars. With lightning speed, the class raced through colonialism, Darwinism, the Russian Revolution, World Wars I and II and the rest of the twentieth century. Dashing from one topic to the next, the teacher affirmed time and time again, yes, you will be tested on this stuff.

While the rush was particularly noticeable in history, it was not limited to delving into the past. Up and down the hallways, our teachers were determined to plow through the remaining curriculum. A final whoosh of angles, differentials and integrals as well as molecules, compounds and diffusion sped into one ear and out the other. One last volume of Shakespeare or Hemingway had to be finished and another group of verbs conjugated.

If anything, afterschool was worse. As teenagers, all we wanted to do was ride around in a convertible with Alice Cooper blasting – school’s out. Up to no good or some harmless fun, we wanted to be anywhere but home on those warm, early summer evenings. A double dose of homework was nowhere on the wish list.

I found it particularly frustrating that my family spent these early summer evenings lolling around outside. Mom and Dad sat on the front stoop while my little brother played with the dog. Neighbors strolled by and stopped to chat. It seemed like everyone was relaxing and having fun but me. While they played, I was in my room, sweating through past participles and suffering through Mendel’s peas. Adding insult to injury, my bedroom was in the front of the house. I could hear everyone having fun while I poured over my books.

Anyway, here’s what I got and it ain’t much. To all the kids still lining up for the bus every morning, be brave. The end is almost in sight. Before you know it, it will be summer and you’ll be complaining about how bored you are.

Stay cool and bon appétit!

Grilled Zucchini Tacos
Zucchini will make a great addition to your next mix and match taco party. Can’t wait? They’ll be perfect by themselves on any Meatless Monday or Taco Tuesday. Enjoy!
Serves 8

2 pints cherry tomatoes – in a mix of colors if available
1-2 red bell peppers, seeded and cut in 1/4-inch strips
1 large red onion, cut in half and then in thin wedges
Olive oil
1 teaspoon cumin
Sea salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
5-6 medium zucchinis, trimmed and sliced on the diagonal 1/4-1/2 inch thick
8 medium or 16 small flour or corn tortillas
Spicy Cilantro-Mint Salsa (recipe follows)
About 4 ounces queso fresco or feta cheese, crumbled

Preheat the grill to high.

Put the tomatoes, peppers and onion in bowl, drizzle with enough olive oil to lightly coat and sprinkle with cumin, salt and pepper. Toss to coat and transfer to a grill basket. Grill for 4-6 minutes, stirring from time to time.

Brush both sides of the zucchini slices with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Place on the grill and cook until just tender, 2-3 minutes per side.

Wrap the tortillas in foil and, turning once, warm on the grill for 2-3 minutes.

To serve: place a tortilla on each plate, top with slices of grilled zucchini and a spoonful or two of grilled tomatoes, drizzle with Spicy Cilantro-Mint Salsa and sprinkle with queso fresco.

Spicy Cilantro-Mint Salsa
Makes about 1 cup

2-3 tablespoons sherry vinegar
Zest and juice of 1 lime
3-4 cloves garlic
2-3 scallions, cut in inch long pieces
1/2-1 or to taste jalapeno, trimmed, halved and seeded
About 2 cups fresh cilantro leaves
About 1 cup fresh mint leaves
Sea salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
1/2 cup or to taste extra-virgin olive oil

Put the vinegar and lime juice in the bowl of a small food processor, add the white and light green parts of the scallions, garlic and jalapeno, season with salt and pepper and pulse to chop and combine. Add the lime zest, herbs and scallion greens and pulse to chop and combine. Add the olive oil and process until finely chopped and well combined.

Let the salsa sit for at least 30 minutes before serving. Can be made ahead, covered and stored in the refrigerator. Serve at room temperature.

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One Year Ago – Grilled Lamb with Fresh Mint
Two Years Ago – Grilled Pork Tenderloin
Three Years Ago – Greek Salad with Grilled Shrimp
Four Years Ago – Asparagus & Radish Salad
Five Years Ago – Salsa Verde
Six Years Ago – Asian Noodle Salad
Seven Years Ago – Asparagus Goat Cheese Tart
Eight Years Ago – Not Your Ordinary Burger
Nine Years Ago – Strawberry Rhubarb Soup

Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!
Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!

How do you beat the heat in the early days of summer? Feel free to share!

Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook. © Susan W. Nye, 2018

The Taxman Cometh & Poverty Stew with Cilantro-Lime Salsa Verde

It doesn’t rain but it pours. If you live in northern New England and it’s April, that’s both literally and figuratively. As if April wasn’t bad enough already with mud season, someone had to throw in Tax Day. Sure, I knew it was coming but I was too busy skiing to start in March let alone February.

With a week to go, I’m scrambling to get through all the forms. I think I’ve said it before but I’ll say it again. It’s not the difficulty; I can add and subtract. (Heck, I can multiple and divide too.) It’s the complexity, the arcane language and wading through all those forms. Before you go and recommend one, I already use one of those software tax packages. Except for the one W2, the pile of 1099s and receipts from the dentist, home office expense and the like, I’m not shuffling paper. The majority of the slogging is from one screen to another. It may be automated but the whole thing still feels like a quagmire. Come to think of it, all those forms and receipts are still a lot of paper.

That’s what I get for being part of the gig economy. Gigs – sounds like fun doesn’t it. Not only is it a cute little word but it reminds me of musicians. While it definitely has its benefits, it’s not always as cool as it sounds. The gig economy is all about contract work, part-time and temporary jobs. Musicians, writers and artists have been doing it forever.

Now, everybody is getting in on the action. Corporations, large and small, are hiring gig workers to fill gaps and manage the ebbs and flow of business. Some gigs are fulltime and last for months. They’re the consultants, software developers and graphic designers who come on board for big projects. I’m guessing H&R Block has been hiring gig workers like crazy for the past month or so.

Not all gigs are nine to five. Many are for a few hours a week – the teacher who tutors your reluctant fourth grader. Some giggers start young – the middle schooler who walks your dog. Some are seasonal. Think of the guy who cuts your grass every summer. Others, like your Uber driver, start and finish a gig in less than an hour.

Long or short, it doesn’t matter. Before you know it, the gig is up and it’s time to find a new one.

I love gig work because it opens the door to all sorts of interesting, new people, experiences and places. From the everyday to special occasions, I’m delighted to cover it. I’ve written about celebrations and tragedies as well as history, religion, traditions and the lack-of. Every story is a challenge. Every story is an adventure.

Gig work isn’t perfect. You’re generally on your own for health insurance, retirement savings and whatever other benefits a company might offer. Forget about paid vacation time, sick days or holidays. If you don’t work, you don’t get paid. Then, when it comes to filing your taxes, gone are the days of a single W2. With multiple employers, you have a pile of W2s and/or 1099s plus a bunch of self-employment driven deductions. As I said, it’s not difficult; it just takes a while, like forever.

Happy tax season and bon appétit!

Poverty Stew with Cilantro-Lime Salsa Verde
Whether you get a refund or need to write a check, this hearty stew will get you through all the shuffling and calculations. If you need to write a really big check, skip the chicken. Enjoy!
Serves 8

1 pound dried black beans
2 bay leaves
12-16 ounces hot (or sweet) Italian sausage, casings removed
Olive oil
About 3 pounds chicken breasts, bone-in, skin-on
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
1 large onion, peeled and finely chopped
2 carrots, peeled and finely chopped
2 stalks celery, finely chopped
1 red or yellow bell pepper, cored, seeded and finely chopped
1 tablespoon or to taste pureed chipotle in adobo*
2 teaspoons ground cumin
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1/2 teaspoon smoked paprika
4 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
1/2 cup dry white wine
1/4 cup espresso or strong coffee
About 4 cups chicken stock or broth
Sweet Potato Polenta or plain polenta cooked according to package directions
Cilantro-Lime Salsa Verde (recipes follows)

Rinse and soak the beans overnight in 10-12 cups water.

Drain and rinse the beans, put them in a pot, add water to cover by 3-4 inches and 1 bay leaf. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to very low, cover and simmer until tender, 45 minutes-1 hour.

Meanwhile, lightly coat a casserole with olive oil and heat over medium-high. Breaking it up into pieces, sauté the sausage until cooked through, remove from the pan, drain and let cool. When it is cool enough to handle, finely chop the sausage. Reserve.

Season the chicken on both sides with salt and pepper. Place the chicken in the casserole, skin side down and cook until lightly browned, 2-3 minutes per side. Remove the chicken from the casserole and reserve.

Put the onion, carrots, celery, bell pepper, spices and oregano in the casserole, season with salt and pepper and sauté until the onion is translucent. Add the garlic and cook 1 minute more. Stir in the wine, espresso, sausage, beans and remaining bay leaf.

Add the chicken and wiggle the pieces about half way down into the beans, add enough stock to cover the beans plus about an inch. Bring everything to a simmer and transfer to the oven.

Reduce the heat to 350 degrees and cook until the chicken is cooked through, about 30-45 minutes. Remove from the oven and let sit for about 30 minutes.

When cool enough to handle, remove the chicken from the casserole. Discard the skin and bones and cut or tear the chicken into bite-sized pieces. Stir the chicken back into the beans.

The stew is best if be covered and refrigerated for several hours or overnight.

Reheat the stew on the stovetop or in a 350-degree oven until bubbling.

Serve the stew with a spoonful of Sweet Potato Polenta and a dollop of Cilantro-Lime Salsa Verde.

* Toss a can of chipotle peppers along with the adobo in a small food processor and process until smooth. Transfer to a clean glass jar, store in the refrigerator and use as needed.

Cilantro-Lime Salsa Verde
Zest and juice of 1 lime
2 cloves garlic
1 scallion, thinly sliced
1 teaspoon or to taste roughly chopped jalapeno
About 2 cups cilantro leaves
1/4 cup or to taste extra-virgin olive oil
Kosher salt to taste

Put the lime zest and juice, garlic, scallion and jalapeno in the bowl of a small food processor and pulse to chop and combine. Add the cilantro and olive oil, season with salt and process until finely chopped and well combined.

Let the salsa sit for at least 30 minutes before serving. Can be made ahead, covered and stored in the refrigerator. Serve at room temperature.

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One Year Ago – Lemon Pound Cake
Two Years Ago – Lavender Scones
Three Years Ago – Calzones with Marinara Sauce
Four Years Ago – Chocolate-Espresso Cheesecake
Five Years Ago – Runners’ Chicken with Pasta
Six Years Ago – Steamed Artichokes with Bagna Cauda or Warm Lemon-Garlic Sauce
Seven Years Ago – Death by Chocolate Cake
Eight Years Ago – Filet de Perche Meunière
Nine Years Ago – Chicken Provençal

Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!

How are you coping with tax season? Feel free to share!

Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook. © Susan W. Nye, 2018

Loving Late Summer & Grilled Shrimp Tacos with Charred Corn, Tomatoes & Salsa Verde

The back-to-school ads have started. Backpacks, notebooks, laptops and high tops – it’s a sign. A sign that summer is waning and fall will be here before you know. However, it is a sign that I suggest we all choose to ignore. After all, late summer might be the very best kind.

Think about it for a minute.

If you’re nine, you’re ecstatic. After several tries, finally, you passed your raft test. Since then you’ve been back and forth to the raft at least a thousand times. Maybe more. There is nothing better than swimming out to the raft with your friends. Okay, maybe a swim to the raft with your great-grandpa beats all.

If you’re nineteen, you’ve had a bit more than half the summer to develop a gorgeous tan. You may be due back at school in a matter of days but you don’t care. You’ve had a great summer. The menial summer job you were expecting to hate turned out fine. Your co-workers were fantastic and you made some money. You read several unexpectedly great novels. You look marvelous. Your friends will be green with envy.

If you’re twenty-nine you’re probably on a wonderful adventure or just back from one. Maybe you traveled through Europe or hiked the Himalayas. Maybe you took a week, maybe the entire summer. When I was twenty-nine, I spent the summer in Switzerland. And then, wouldn’t you know it, I forgot to come home. My friends were divided, some were jealous. The rest didn’t quite know what to think.

If you’re thirty-nine you may be having a bit of a crisis. At least I did. Don’t worry about it. You’ll be fine. With all that running (I ran a lot in my thirties) and Sundays at the beach and sailing, you look stunning. Confidence becomes you. Admit it; you’re coming into your own. You may not be the smartest person in the room but you get it. You know how great you are.

If you’re forty-nine or maybe fifty-nine and lucky, the summer sun has had plenty of time to give your hair a few highlights. You can pretend all those streaks are blond, not gray. Your friends will be amazed at how young you look. And that crisis-thingy you had back in your late thirties, it’s long gone. Wisdom looks good on you. Speaking of wisdom, you know and really don’t care that those streaks are gray. Truth is – you don’t want to spend half the afternoon every third week at the hair salon.

If you’re sixty-nine and beyond, you’ve made an exciting discovery. You are happier than you have ever been. You’ve spent the good part of the summer enjoying life. That’s what retirement is all about. Maybe you’ve taken a trip, maybe not. When you live in a beautiful place, a staycation is just fine. In fact, it’s more than fine.

Now finally, if you’re ninety or even ninety-nine the water is finally warm enough for your annual swim. Unlike your nine-year-old great-grandson, you have not been back and forth to the raft a hundred times a day. However, your friends of all ages will still be very much impressed that you continue take your annual plunge. They should be.

So, you see, regardless of your age, life couldn’t be sweeter.

All the best for the final days of summer and bon appétit!

Grilled Shrimp Tacos with Charred Corn, Tomatoes & Salsa Verde
A tasty late summer feast for people of all ages! Enjoy!
Serves 8

3-4 ears corn
Olive oil
2 – 2 1/2 pounds extra-jumbo (16-20 per pound) raw shrimp, peeled and deveined
2 tablespoons dry white wine
Zest and juice of 1 lime
2 cloves garlic, minced
1-2 tablespoons chipotles in adobo puree*
1 teaspoon cumin
Kosher salt to taste
16 small or 8 large flour tortillas
Salsa Verde (recipe follows)
2 cups cherry tomatoes, chopped
About 4 ounces queso fresco or feta cheese, crumbled

Preheat the grill to high.

Brush the corn with a little olive oil. Lay the ears directly on the grill and cook for 5-7 minutes, turning to cook evenly. Remove from the grill and when cool enough to handle, use a sharp knife to remove the kernels from the cob.

Meanwhile, put 2-3 tablespoons olive oil, the wine, lime juice and zest, garlic, cumin and chipotle puree in a bowl, season with salt and stir to combine. Add the shrimp and turn to coat. Stirring once or twice, marinate the shrimp at room temperature for about 15 minutes.

Thread the shrimp onto wooden skewers** or place them directly on the grill. Grill the shrimp, turning once, until just opaque, 1-2 minutes per side.

Wrap the tortillas in foil and, turning once, warm on the grill for 2-3 minutes.

To serve: place a tortilla on each plate, top with shrimp, charred corn and chopped tomatoes, drizzle with Salsa Verde and sprinkle with queso fresco.

* To make chipotle puree – take a can of chipotle in adobo and toss the peppers and the adobo sauce in a small food processor or blender and process until smooth. Transfer to a clean glass jar and store in the refrigerator. Use as needed.

** If you like, you can thread the shrimp onto wooden skewers like kabobs. When cooking for a crowd, it is quicker to turn kabobs than lots of individual shrimp. Be sure to soak the skewers in water for about 30 minutes.

Salsa Verde
Makes about 2 cups

Zest and juice of 1 lime
2-3 tablespoons (to taste) white wine vinegar
2-3 scallions, thinly sliced
2 tablespoons capers, drained and finely chopped
1-2 cloves garlic, minced
1/2-1 ancho or jalapeno chili, minced
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
About 1 1/2 cups fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves
About 1 cup fresh cilantro leaves
About 1/2 cup fresh mint leaves
1/2 cup or to taste extra-virgin olive oil

Put the lime zest and juice, vinegar, scallions, capers, garlic and chili in a bowl, season with salt and toss to combine. Finely chop the herbs, add to the bowl and toss to combine. Whisking constantly with a fork, slowly add the olive oil and whisk to combine.

If you prefer, you can make the salsa in a mini processor. Throw everything in and give it a whirl.

Let the salsa sit for at least 30 minutes before serving. Serve at room temperature.

Can be made ahead, covered and stored in the refrigerator for 1-2 days.

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One Year Ago – Heirloom Tomato Salad with Grilled Corn, Cucumber & Feta
Two Years Ago – Bluebree Grunt
Three Years Ago – Almond Macarons with Chocolate-Raspberry Ganache
Four Years Ago – Watermelon-Limeade
Five Years Ago – Filet de Sole Meunière
Six Years Ago – Artichoke Leaves with Shrimp
Seven Years Ago – Spicy Grilled Chicken
Eight Years Ago – Corn & Tomato Salad
Nine Years Ago – Summer Rolls

Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!

What about you? What do you love about late summer? Feel free to share!

Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook. © Susan W. Nye, 2017

Cinco de Mayo & Grilled Shrimp with Salsa de Cacahuate y Chile de Arbol

May 5th, better known as Cinco de Mayo, is this coming Friday. I’m sure you’ve heard of it. Celebrated from coast to coast with tequila shots and tacos, it is an excellent excuse for a party. Perhaps you’ve been thinking that it would fun to have a totally authentic Cinco de Mayo celebration. You know, skip the queso dip and Macarena in favor of real Mexican flavors and dance steps. I get it. You want to a party like they do down in sunny Mexico.

Alright then, here’s what you do … nothing. Yup, that’s right. Absolutely nothing.

Cinco de Mayo is not celebrated in Mexico. Widely mistaken for Mexican Independence Day, Cinco de Mayo commemorates an early victory in the Franco-Mexican War. The Battle of Puebla took place on May 5, 1862. The resulting victory was more than fifty years after Mexico declared its independence from Spain. In case you’ve forgotten, Mexico was a colony of Spain not France.

So indeed, our enthusiastic celebrations of Cinco de Mayo are somewhat akin to the Swiss celebrating the American victory against the British in the 1814 Battle of Plattsburgh. In case you’re wondering, they don’t. I know where Plattsburgh is but I doubt that too many of my Swiss friends do. I also know where Puebla is. Not because I’m a geography or history whizz but because I looked it up on a map a few minutes ago.

Regardless of whatever convoluted calculations or interpretations you might try to make, Cinco de Mayo adds up to being a mostly American holiday. I suppose that’s makes sense. After all, we are a nation of immigrants and many of our holidays reflect that. The Chinese New Year celebrates our ties with China. Everyone is Irish on Saint Patrick’s Day. Oktoberfest has found its way from Munich to Muncie and several other U.S. cities.

Now the question arises – how to celebrate? Well, you could find one of those 100-foot margarita bars, the kind that serves fruity cocktails in glasses the size of fish bowls. Alternatively, you could expand your horizons and spend the day learning something about Mexico. Listen to Mexican music, study Mexican artists, investigate true Mexican cuisine or get a better understanding of how our two economies can and do work together.

Complete your day with a Mexican-inspired celebration. Skip the taco chain restaurants for a more authentic experience. I’m not sure if you can find real Mexican food this far north but you can always try. Many of us dream that one of those absolutely wonderful Mom and Pop-type Mexican restaurant will miraculously appear close to home. So far, it hasn’t happened but one can always hope.

For now, invite a few friends over and try your hand at some Mexican-inspired dishes. Dinner outside in early May in New Hampshire is probably pushing it but cocktails on the porch might work. Set your table with a brightly colored cloth and flowers and think warm and sunny thoughts.

Feliz Cinco de Mayo y ¡buen apetito!

Oh, and by the way, Mexican Independence Day – it’s on September 16.

Grilled Shrimp with Salsa de Cacahuate y Chile de Arbol
Appetizer or main course, shrimp with spicy peanut sauce will make a delicious addition to your Cinco de Mayo feast. This smooth peanut sauce is also good with chicken. Enjoy!
Serves 8

Salsa de Cacahuate y Chile de Arbol
Makes about 1 1/2 cups

Olive oil
3/4 cup roasted peanuts
1/2 onion, chopped
4 or more (to taste) dried arbol (also called bird’s beak) chiles, stemmed
1/2 teaspoon allspice
6 cloves garlic, chopped
1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves
1/2-3/4 cup chicken stock or broth
Sea salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
Juice of 1/2 lime or to taste

Lightly coat a skillet with olive oil and heat over medium. Add the onion, peanuts and chiles, season with allspice, salt and pepper and sauté until the onion starts to become translucent. Add the garlic and thyme and sauté until the onion is soft and the garlic is fragrant, 2-3 minutes more.

Add the chicken stock and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer, uncovered, for 5 minutes. Let the salsa cool for about 15 minutes, transfer to a blender and process until very smooth. Cool to room temperature, stir in the lime juice and serve.

The salsa can be prepared in advance, covered and stored in the refrigerator. Bring to room temperature before serving.

Grilled Shrimp
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 clove garlic, minced
Grated zest and juice of 1 lime
About 2 1/2 pounds extra-large shrimp, peeled and de-veined
Sea salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
Wooden skewers, soaked in water for at least 30 minutes (optional)

Put the olive oil in a bowl, add the garlic, lime zest and juice and whisk to combine. Add the shrimp, season with salt and pepper and toss to combine. Marinate in the refrigerator for 15-30 minutes.

Heat the grill to medium-high. Place the shrimp directly on the grill or thread them onto the soaked skewers. Grill the shrimp, turning once, until just opaque, 2-4 minutes. Serve warm or at room temperature with Salsa de Cacahuate y Chile de Arbol.

The shrimp can be grilled in advance, covered and stored in the refrigerator.

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One Year Ago – Puffy Apple Pancake
Two Years Ago – Tostadas with Avocado Crema & Black Bean Salsa
Three Years Ago – Cheddar-Sage Biscuits
Four Years Ago – Lemon-Lime Squares
Five Years Ago – Tarte à l’Oignon (Onion Tart)
Six Years Ago – Honeyed Apricots with Creamy Yogurt
Seven Years Ago – Black & White Brownies
Eight Years Ago – Rhubarb Muffins

Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!

What about you? How will you celebrate Cinco de Mayo and our southern neighbor on Friday? Feel free to share!

Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook. © Susan W. Nye, 2017