A Perfect Summer & Watermelon Sorbet

misty_morning_pleasant_lake_04Do you have fond memories of a perfect summer? Maybe you were six or ten or sixteen. Whenever it was, I’m guessing you weren’t quite so demanding when it came to perfection. You didn’t worry about every star aligning. Instead, it was perfect because you learned to swim. That’s all it took. Or maybe it was your first time away at sleep-over camp. Archery and lanyards, campfires and s’mores and a bronze medal for the backstroke were more than enough to make you happy. Until you fell hopelessly, madly in love and that became the most perfect, perfect summer.

So what would it take to make this one a perfect summer?

Catching a perfect wave off the coast of Oaxaca? Followed by a champagne picnic on the grounds of Downton Abbey or a red carpet gala in the Hamptons? Interspersed with trips to watch the grand slam trifecta of Paris, Wimbledon and Flushing Meadows? The finals of course, live, up-close and personal. Then again, maybe for you it’s a yacht in the Mediterranean or a villa in Tuscany? Or reaching the summit of Mont Blanc or summer skiing on Zermatt?

Summer bucket lists can get pretty exotic pretty fast. At five, our goal was to catch a million frogs. Now we’ve upgraded our bucket list to a safari in South Africa. At eight, we wanted nothing more than to pass our raft test. How did our list inflate to swimming with sharks? At fifteen, we wanted to see Aerosmith live and dance all night. And now, well, maybe not everything has changed. Except maybe the cost of the ticket. Back then, we danced all night for a dollar, now it’s closer to $50.

Is it time to reel it in a bit? Catch some frogs and tap our toes at the town bandstand? Maybe those childhood summers were perfect because our definition of perfect was just a tad simpler.

Maybe all we need to do to have a perfect summer is to …

Go for an early morning swim.

Build a sand castle. Think Notre Dame or the Taj Mahal and then build whatever you like.

Hunt for stuff – shells, interesting stones, pinecones and twigs – and then turn them into something charming.

Grab a map and go for a long bike ride or hike. Afterward, cool off with a swim to the raft.

Throw a Frisbee. Throw a Frisbee for your dog or your friend’s dog.

Tie-dye a t-shirt or decorate some flip-flops and wear with pride.

Visit a farm, pick peaches, blueberries or raspberries and show off your t-shirt.

Make homemade lemonade, pink please, or limeade or watermelon-ade. Better yet, freeze it and turn it into popsicles or sorbet.

Catch a fish and call it dinner. Don’t forget the s’mores for dessert.

Sleep under the stars, even if it is just under a skylight.

Here’s to the perfect summer and bon appétit!

Watermelon Sorbet
Makes about 1 quartwatermelon_sorbet_04

6-8 cups cubed seedless watermelon
1/2 cup or to taste Lime Simple Syrup
2 tablespoons tequila
1 tablespoon triple sec

Put the watermelon, Lime Simple Syrup, tequila and triple sec in a blender or food processor and process until smooth.

Transfer the mix to an ice cream machine and freeze according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Transfer the sorbet to a plastic container and freeze for up to one month.

Lime Simple Syrup
1 cup sugar
1 cup water
Zest from 1-2 limes
1/2 cup fresh lime juice

Put the sugar and water in a small saucepan and, stirring until the sugar has dissolved, heat over medium. Raise the heat to high and bring to a boil. Lower the heat, add the zest and simmer for 10 minutes.

Remove the pan from the heat and cool for 10 minutes in the pan. Strain the syrup through a fine mesh sieve into a clean storage container and discard the zest. Cool completely and stir in the lime juice.

Cover and refrigerate until ready to use. Lime Simple Syrup should keep for up to 1 month in the refrigerator.

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One Year Ago – Caramel Sundaes with Sweet & Salty Pecans
Two Years Ago – Gazpacho
Three Years Ago – Mousse au Citron
Four Years Ago– Thai Salad
Five Years Ago – Sweet Dream Bars
Six Years Ago – Lobster Salad
Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!

What’s your idea of a perfect summer? Feel free to share – let’s get a conversation going. Click here to leave a comment.

Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook. In addition, I hope that you will take a minute to learn about my philanthropic project Eat Well-Do Good. © Susan W. Nye, 2014

Fun Chippies & Blackberry Chocolate Chip Frozen Yogurt

Every family has its own mini subculture. At least mine does or did. Throughout my childhood we shared a few habits and traditions that helped knit our family together. Traditions like:
• Presents on Christmas Day, not Eve. I think my sister, brother and I were a little envious of the kids who opened their presents on Christmas Eve.
• We always stayed on the beach until the very last possible moment on Labor Day, before heading back to the ‘burbs. We were never envious of the kids who left a few days early to shoe shop and buy notebooks.
• Chips with lobster – I was shocked the first time I had lobster at someone else’s house. They served potato salad and not chips. It seemed positively barbarian.
The list goes on and on. We still follow a lot of these little habits but not all.

There are jokes and stories that no gets but us. No matter how hilarious we find them and ourselves, no one else seems to. And finally, there is the language thing. Yes we speak English but we have a few special words to describe this or that. For example:
• We never had leftovers; we had Slusser’s Delight and breadandwithit. Although, there was never any bread.
• After a long, busy day, we were known to have a sinking spell. When that happened, we didn’t put on our jammies, we got into our nonni-nunus and relaxed in front of the television.
• And our favorite ice cream was filled with fun chippies<.em>.

We discovered fun chippies soon after we began spending our summers on Pleasant Lake. Mass market and chain restaurant ice creams paled in comparison to the homemade delights at the Grey House. There was no gum, no Arabic, no stabilizers or fillers. We’d grown up on Howard Johnson’s ice cream. Heck, my grandmother went to school with the original Howard. His chocolate chip and mint chocolate chip ice creams were filled with miniscule specks of chocolate. They had nowhere near the charm of the Grey House’s fun chippies.

At the time, they were a novelty, a far cry from Howard’s specks and the big, fat flakes of imitation chocolate in cheap, supermarket ice cream. For all our fascination, fun chippies were nothing more than the mini morsels that Nestlé now sells in supermarkets from coast to coast. And nothing less than real chocolate. The Grey House threw them into a bunch of different ice creams – vanilla, black raspberry, mint, coffee and chocolate. Not just yummy, we thought they were adorable.

We thought our nickname was terribly clever. I’m not sure who in the family coined it, probably my sister Brenda. To this day, we don’t understand why it never became a part of the local language along with frappes and jimmies. Alas, fun chippies never appeared on the Grey House menu. Or on any other menu for that matter.

My mother was always watching her waistline and had to be cajoled into taking us out for ice cream. However, Dad took personal pride in New England’s claim as the Ice Cream Eating Champions of the World. On hot summer nights he would shout out to anyone who would listen, “Who wants fun chippies?” Feet pounded and doors slammed and in a matter of seconds kids and dogs were packed into the back seat of the station wagon and ready to go. Fun chippies were the perfect way to end an already perfect day in paradise.

The Grey House and its ice cream window closed years ago, but you can still find old-fashion, homemade ice cream stands scattered across New England. Why not visit one real soon!?!

Bon appétit!

Blackberry Yogurt Ice Cream with Fun Chippies
Want to get the good old fashion taste of a New England ice cream stand, try making your own. Enjoy!
Makes about 1 quart

1 quart nonfat plain yogurt
1 pound fresh blackberries
1 cup half & half
1/2 – 3/4 cup (to taste) brown sugar or honey
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
1 tablespoon pure vanilla extract
1-2 tablespoons Framboise* (optional)
1/2 cup (or to taste) mini chocolate chips

Put the yogurt in a colander or sieve lined with a clean dishtowel or coffee filter and drain for several hours or overnight. You should end up with about 2 cups of yogurt cheese.

Put the blackberries in a blender with about 1/2 cup half & half and process until smooth. Pour the mixture through a fine mesh sieve to remove the seeds.

Put the yogurt, brown sugar, salt, vanilla, Framboise and remaining half & half in a in a bowl and whisk to combine. Slowly add the blackberry-cream and whisk until smooth. Chill for at least an hour. The mix should be very cold.

Transfer the mix to an ice cream machine and freeze according to the manufacturer’s instructions. In the final few minutes, slowly pour in the chocolate chips and continue to process until the chocolate chips are well integrated into the ice cream. Transfer the ice cream to a plastic container and freeze for up to one month.

If the ice cream comes out of the freezer rock hard, put it in the refrigerator for 30-45 minutes. It will soften a little and be easier to scoop.

* Framboise is a French raspberry liqueur.

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One Year Ago – Brown Sugar Yogurt Gelato
Two Years Ago – Red Pepper Dip
Three Years Ago – Grilled Chicken, Shallots & New Potatoes
Four Years Ago – Barbecue Chicken
Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!

How do you keep cool when temperatures soar? I’d love to hear from you! Let’s get a conversation going.

Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook as well as a day in the life photoblog! In addition, I hope that you will take a minute to learn about my philanthropic project Eat Well-Do Good. © Susan W. Nye, 2012

Heat Wave & Chocolate-Chocolate Sorbet

Last week we had our first heat wave of the summer. You know what they say, “It’s not the heat it’s the humidity.” Well they’re wrong. It’s BOTH. It’s the HEAT and the HUMIDITY. After our incredibly mild winter, I hope this early heat wave is not a premonition for a hot hot summer to come.

For now, I’ll stay positive and just assume we’ll have no more than our usual share of dog days. But just in case, I’ve put together a few tips on how to survive a heat wave. Let’s hope we don’t need them too soon or too often!

1. Follow Nana’s advice. Leave the windows open at night and put fans all over the house to get the air circulating. In the morning, close the windows and pull the curtains to keep the cool air in and hot air out.

2. Get one of those big, beautiful fans. The kind you see geishas gently fluttering in the movies. If it’s too hot to leave the house in search of a fan, fold a piece of paper accordion style, staple one end and flap away.

3. Stand in front of the open refrigerator or better yet the freezer until a voice in your head (I’m betting it’s your mother’s) shouts for you to SHUT THAT DOOR.

4. Eat and drink cool. That means lots of ice water. And then some more. Be sure to eat plenty of ice cream, gelato and sorbet. Heck, munch on frozen peas it you must.

5. Hang out in the freezer section of the supermarket. If the manager gets suspicious and throws you out or you get tired of standing around, take a trip to the library. If your town library is not air-conditioned try the book store. Of course you could go to the movies but that would only kill a couple of hours. Besides there are always lots of nice people in libraries and book stores and they have comfy chairs.

6. Find a tree and a breeze. Park yourself under the tree and don’t move except to sip a frosty drink. Daydream of igloos and Eskimo pies. Snooze often.

7. Go to the beach and float in the water for hours and hours. If you don’t live near a lake or a pond or the ocean, find a pool or run through a sprinkler. If all else fails fill the bathtub with cool water. Floaties and fins as well as a rubber ducky or two are optional.

8. Move to the basement. Hot air rises so the basement is usually nice and cool. Even if it is a little damp and musty.

9. Buy an air-conditioner, at least for your bedroom. Yes, I know we always say it never gets all that hot in New Hampshire. But we lie. It does get all that hot, if only for a few days, two, maybe three times every summer. And please take note; wrestle the air-conditioner into the window before the mercury climbs to ninety-five, not after.

10. When all else fails, book a flight to Antarctica. Leave your flip-flops at home.

Stay cool, have a wonderful summer and bon appétit!

(p.s. … and remember … if you start to feel faint or ill, call for help!)

Chocolate-Chocolate Sorbet

A cool treat for chocoholics. Enjoy!
Makes about 1 quart

1 cup sugar
3/4 cup cocoa powder
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 cup freshly brewed espresso
2 cups hot water
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1 tablespoon Irish whiskey, coffee liqueur or rum (optional)
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
3-4 ounces bittersweet or semisweet
chocolate, finely chopped

Put the sugar, cocoa powder, cinnamon and salt in a medium bowl and whisk to combine. Whisk in the hot espresso and whisk until smooth. Slowly whisk in the hot water and continue whisking until the cocoa powder and sugar dissolves and the mixture is smooth.

Add the Irish whiskey and vanilla. Cool to room temperature and then store in the refrigerator until very cold.

Freeze the sorbet in an ice cream freezer according to the manufacturer’s directions, adding the chopped chocolate in the last 1-2 minutes.

Transfer the sorbet to a plastic container and freeze for 1-2 hours or until firm enough to scoop.

The sorbet will keep in the freezer for up to one month. If it comes out of the freezer rock hard, put it in the refrigerator for 30-45 minutes. It will soften a little and be easier to scoop.

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One Year Ago – Caesar Salad with Parmesan Croutons
Two Years Ago – The Best Grilled Cheese Sandwich in the History of my Kitchen
Three Years Ago – Asian Slaw Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!

How do you stay cool during a heat wave? I’d love to hear from you! Let’s get a conversation going.

Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook as well as a day in the life photoblog! In addition, I hope that you will take a minute to learn about my philanthropic project Eat Well-Do Good. © Susan W. Nye, 2012

Our Wellesley Season & Bananas Foster

I lived near San Francisco for a couple of years and found the weather a bit disconcerting. As far as I could tell, there were no seasons. Every day was like a sunny day in May, not too hot and with no humidity to speak off. (My curly locks were remarkably well behaved.) My friend Julie is a California native. She insists that it takes a little time to adjust to her home State’s subtle seasonal changes. I admit I never gave it a chance. As soon as I could, I fled the west coast and headed home to New England. There is nothing subtle about New England’s seasons. (My curly locks agree and frequently misbehave).

We are now in what my mother used to call Our Wellesley Season. That’s what she called April and May when we were kids. It sounds a little fancy like we had one of those big rambling cottages in the country and an elegant mansion in the suburbs. In reality we had a little brown house in the New Hampshire woods and a nice but hardly Trump-like home in the suburbs of Boston.

Massachusetts was where we went to school and worked. New Hampshire was where we played. We spent as much time as we possibly could there. The end of the school year bell was still ringing when our station wagon hit the road and headed north to Pleasant Lake. When school started again in September we barely made it back for homeroom the first day. Throughout the fall and winter, all of our weekends and vacations were spent enjoying New Hampshire’s hills.

But here’s our guilty confession. As much as we all loved it, every spring we deserted the Granite State. Forget for better or worse. Fickle flatlanders, we kept our distance when April showers and melting snow turned the hills and fields into a muddy mess and the lake was cold and gray. It’s easy to love New Hampshire when it’s bright green, brilliant red and gold or sparkling white with snow. Even this year, when winter was remarkably short and mild, it’s clear why we stayed away. Spring is very slow in coming. Except for a few brave clumps of bright purple crocuses, everywhere you look, it’s a drab gray or brown.

That’s not to say that Boston’s suburbs were clear and sunny. April showers were commonplace but, unlike New Hampshire, April snowstorms were few and far between. I remember more than a few boring, rainy Saturday afternoons. However, there was a movie theatre in town, the television got more than one fuzzy station and the ice cream parlor was open year-round. Suburban roads were paved and our driveway was not lost in a sea of mud. Long before the snow banks melted in front of our little brown house in the woods, our garden in Wellesley was filled with cheery daffodils and tulips. Furthermore, marauding deer did not plow through those blooms like a pack of starving tourists at an all-you-can-eat Atlantic City buffet.

Now that I live in New Hampshire year-round, I have no Wellesley to escape to during Wellesley Season. (I did spend a few hours in Manchester yesterday but I don’t think that counts.) Truth be told, I don’t miss suburbia. However, a trip to the big city (any big city will do but preferably someplace warm) or a tropical island might be nice right about now!

Bon appétit!

Bananas Foster

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If someplace warm isn’t in your travel plans this spring, a traditional New Orleans dessert will cheer you up after one too many gray days. Enjoy!
Serves 4
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4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) unsalted butter
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/4 teaspoon allspice
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 bananas, peeled and cut on the diagonal in 1/2-inch slices
1/4 cup dark rum
Vanilla ice cream
Chopped pecans, toasted

Melt the butter in a heavy skillet over low heat. Add the brown sugar, allspice, cinnamon, nutmeg and salt and stir until the sugar dissolves. Raise the heat to medium-high and bring to a simmer. Add the bananas and cook for 2-3 minutes, carefully spooning the sauce over the bananas.

Remove the pan from the heat and add the rum. Ignite the rum, return the pan to the heat and continue cooking, swirling the sauce, until flame dies out and the sauce is syrupy, 1-3 minutes.

To serve: scoop vanilla cream into individual dessert bowls. Gently spoon the warm bananas and sauce over and around the ice cream, garnish with toasted pecans and serve immediately.

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One Year Ago – Tapenade
Two Year Ago – Lavender Infused White Chocolate Crème
Three Years Ago – Lemon Tart
Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!

What do you do in early spring? Flee south or grin (or not) and bear it? I’d love to hear from you! Let’s get a conversation going. To make a comment, just click on Comments below. I’d be delighted to add you to the growing list of blog subscribers. To subscribe: just scroll back up, fill in your email address and click on the Sign Me Up button. You’ll get an email asking you to confirm your subscription … confirm and you will automatically receive a new story and recipe every week.

Want more? Click here for lots more to read, see & cook! In addition, I hope that you will take a minute to learn about my philanthropic project Eat Well-Do Good. © Susan W. Nye, 2012

The Popsicle Man & Brown Sugar Yogurt Gelato

I grew up in suburbia, just outside of Boston. When I was really small we spent the month of August on the Cape. Our summer home away from home was a ramshackle rental within walking distance of the beach and both sets of grandparents. In July we waited eagerly for August. If the suburban heat became truly unbearable, my mom would grab us kids, the dogs and my grandmother and escape to the Cape. Yes, we abandoned our men folk to their air-conditioned offices with nary a thought or regret.

But most of the time, we hung out in the ‘burbs with our friends. My three best pals, MaryBeth, Binky and Mary, kept me company most of the time. We took swimming lessons in Morses Pond and Lake Waban. We rode out bikes up and down Jackson Road. We climbed trees. If it rained, the local movie theater offered a matinee. We wandered around a fair bit, in the woods behind our houses, around Longfellow Pond and in and out of each other’s houses. We probably spent more time looking for something to do than actually doing it. Sometime in the mid to late afternoon we started to raise our antenna and listen for the Popsicle Man.

You never wanted to be too far from home when the Popsicle Man came around. It was a race against time to beat it home and convince your mom to give you a nickel. You then had to race back down the street and catch up with the white truck with its gaily painted pictures of frozen treats. As soon as we heard the truck’s first musical jingle, our little legs would pump like crazy. For some horrible but unknown reason, the Popsicle Man always started at our end of the street. We’d pass him as we dashed up the hill. We hoped against all hope that a big, long line would form and give us plenty of time to get home, get a nickel and make it back before he disappeared for another day.

It didn’t matter if there were cookies in the jar or ice cream in the freezer, we always wanted a frozen treat from the Popsicle Man. But first we had to convince our moms to hand over that nickel. The later he cruised through the neighborhood in his musical white truck, the harder the negotiation. For some crazy reason, the closer it was to dinner time, the more our mothers objected.

A nickel would get you a bright red, cherry Popsicle or a chocolaty Fudgesicle or a creamy Dreamsicle. Popsicles and Fudgesicles came on a double stick. If Mom hesitated, I would offer to share with my sister or save half for after dinner. A dime would get you a Chocolate Cover. I have no idea if that’s their real name but that’s what we called them. A Chocolate Cover was like an Eskimo Pie and was on a single stick. While Fudgesicles were my favorite, Mom was partial to Chocolate Covers. I knew I’d increase my chances if I offered to bring her one. The hotter the day, the easier the negotiation.

Finally she would relent. Off I’d race, nickels and dimes jingling and a list of frozen treats to buy for the entire family. And since the Popsicle Man usually cruised down Jackson Road at a glacial crawl, more often than not, I managed to catch him before he disappeared around the corner to another neighborhood.

Stay cool! Bon appétit!

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Brown Sugar Yogurt Gelato
It’s been a long time since I indulged in a Fudgesicle. I’m guessing they’ll set you back more than a nickel these days. This summer my favorite frozen treat is Brown Sugar Yogurt Gelato. Sweet and a bit tangy, smooth and creamy, it is the perfect treat on a steamy afternoon. Enjoy!

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Makes about 1 quart

1 quart nonfat plain yogurt
1/2 – 3/4 cup (to taste) brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon pure vanilla extract
1 1/2 – 2 cups half & half

Put the yogurt in a colander or sieve lined with a clean dishtowel or coffee filter; let drain for several hours or overnight. You should end up with about 2 cups of yogurt cheese.

Put the yogurt, brown sugar, salt, vanilla and about 1/2 cup half & half in a large measuring cup. Whisk to combine. Slowly add the remaining half & half and whisk until smooth. Add enough half & half to make 1 quart of gelato mix.

Transfer the mixture into an ice cream machine and freeze according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Transfer to a plastic container and freeze for up to one month.

If the gelato comes out of the freezer rock hard, put it in the refrigerator for 30-45 minutes. It will soften a little and be easier to scoop. Garnish with fresh berries and serve.

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One Year Ago – Red Pepper Dip
Two Years Ago – Grilled Chicken, Shallots & New Potatoes
Three Years Ago – Barbecue Chicken

What’s your summer story? I’d love to hear from you! Let’s get a conversation going. To make a comment, just click on Comments below.

I’d be delighted to add you to the growing list of blog subscribers. To subscribe: just scroll back up, fill in your email address and click on the Sign Me Up button. You’ll get an email asking you to confirm your subscription … confirm and you will automatically receive a new story and recipe every week.

Feel free to visit my other, cleverly named blog, Susan Nye’s Other Blog, or photoblog Susan Nye 365. You can find more than 250 recipes, links to magazine articles and lots more on my website. I hope that you will take a minute to learn about my philanthropic project Eat Well-Do Good.©Susan W. Nye, 2010

Flag Days & Strawberry Gelato

It’s happened to all of us. A song gets stuck in our heads and refuses to budge. It could be Wheels on the Bus from nursery school, Frank’s version of New York New York or any one of a dozen one hit wonders. Different songs take up residence in my head throughout the year and vary by season. Twelve Days of Christmas seems to take hold for the entire month of December. Old Girl Scout camp songs come and go throughout the summer. As for Motown hits, they can catch hold at anytime.

From Memorial Day through D-Day commemorations, Flag Day and the Fourth of July, it’s not a song but a poem that creeps into my brain and refuses to budge. It’s Henry Holcomb Bennett’s famous poem. Whenever I pass a house with flags flying I get the urge to shout, “Hats off! The flag is passing by!” And then maybe rave a little about bugles, white stars and crimson stripes.

It’s my sister’s fault.

My sister Brenda is a few years older than me. I still remember when she memorized Mr. Bennett’s poem. It was not on a lark but a school assignment. I don’t know whether she chose that particular poem or if it was thrust upon her. I do know that for days on end (or so it seemed) she memorized and rehearsed; out loud and often. She rehearsed. And rehearsed. And rehearsed.

I can’t speak for the rest of my family but she practiced until I knew the poem by heart. Heck, I still remember parts of it all these years later. Truth be told, it’s a bit like having Muskrat Love stuck in your head for all eternity but much more patriotic.

And so now if it’s not there already, I’ll stick it in your head. Mr. Bennett’s poem that is, not “Muskrat Love”:

The Flag Goes By

Hats off!
Along the street there comes
A blare of bugles, a ruffle of drums,
A flash of color beneath the sky:
Hats off!
The flag is passing by!

Blue and crimson and white it shines,
Over the steel-tipped, ordered lines.
Hats off!
The colors before us fly;
But more than the flag is passing by.

Sea-fights and land-fights, grim and great,
Fought to make and to save the State:
Weary marches and sinking ships;
Cheers of victory on dying lips;

Days of plenty and years of peace;
March of a strong land’s swift increase;
Equal justice, right and law,
Stately honor and reverend awe;

Sign of a nation, great and strong
To ward her people from foreign wrong:
Pride and glory and honor,—all
Live in the colors to stand or fall.

Hats off!
Along the street there comes
A blare of bugles, a ruffle of drums;
And loyal hearts are beating high:
Hats off!
The flag is passing by!

Henry Holcomb Bennett, 1900

Happy Flag Day on June 14th! Unfurl your flag, enjoy the early days of summer and bon appétit.

Strawberry or Blueberry Gelato 
Strawberries are in season. A perfect excuse to pull out the ice cream machine that’s been sitting in the back of the cupboard all winter. Use this same recipe for Blueberry Gelato later in the summer. Enjoy!
Serves 6

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1 pound fresh strawberries*, hulled and roughly chopped
3/4 cup brown sugar
1 1/2 cups half & half
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1 tablespoon Framboise** (optional)
1/8 teaspoon sea salt
Fresh berries for garnish

In a blender combine the strawberries, sugar, half & half, vanilla and Framboise. Puree until smooth.

Refrigerate overnight or at least 4 hours.

Transfer the mixture into an ice cream machine and freeze according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Transfer to a plastic container and freeze for up to one month.

If the gelato comes out of the freezer rock hard, put it in the refrigerator for 20-30 minutes. It will soften a little and be easier to scoop. Garnish with fresh berries and serve.

* You can substitute blueberries or make a batch of each! Add a scoop of Brown Sugar Gelato for a star spangle bannered dessert.

**Framboise is a French raspberry liqueur.

For more on making ice cream or a  print-friendly version of this post.
One Year Ago – Asparagus Soup

Do you have a question? An idea, a few thoughts or an opinion you’d like to share? I’d love to hear from you! Let’s get a conversation going. To make a comment, just click on Comments below.

I’d be delighted to add you to the growing list of blog subscribers. To subscribe: just scroll back up, fill in your email address and click on the Sign Me Up button. You’ll get an email asking you to confirm your subscription … confirm and you will automatically receive a new story and recipe every week.

Feel free to visit my other, cleverly named blog, Susan Nye’s Other Blog, or website www.susannye.com. You can find more than 200 recipes, links to magazine articles and lots more. I hope that you will take a minute to learn about my philanthropic project Eat Well-Do Good. ©Susan W. Nye, 2010