A Cooking Marathon & Roasted Cauliflower-Cheddar Soup

What a strange winter it has been? Well, strange so far, it ain’t over yet. Yes, we New Englanders like to joke about snowsuits at Halloween. However, what we don’t tell the rest of the world, the snow rarely piles up and it usually melts within a day, maybe two. This year the snow held off until November but it kept coming and coming and coming. Kept coming until December which was unusually warm and rainy instead of snowy.

Now, what will the rest of the winter bring us? Mercifully, January has not given us a whole lot of it’s typical frozen tundra-type temperatures. That said, it could be me but, so far at least, it feels like the month has brought way too many cloudy days. Sure, we’ve had some sun and a couple of real, plowable storms but, mostly, we’ve been plagued with gray skies and what I call nuisance snow.

Since I’m a skier, you might wonder how I could consider any snow a nuisance. Let me explain. Nuisance snow is that inch of fluffy white stuff. It comes with a miserable dampness that makes it feel colder than the actual temperature. Furthermore, that skim of snow is quickly beaten into the pavement and is as slick as ice. In other words, it’s both uncomfortable and an accident waiting to happen.

But when the going gets rough, the tough get cooking! And when it’s really rough, it’s time for a cooking marathon.

Take for instance the other day. I was headed to the supermarket for a gallon of milk. That’s all I really needed. It was snowing so it was slowing going up the hill. As I inched my way to town, a whole bunch of tasty would-be recipes began floating around head. By the time I pulled into the snowy parking lot, I had a list a mile long. In the less than ten minute drive, I developed a hankering for both eggplant and cauliflower. I was betwixt and between curry, an over-indulgent Greek casserole and New England style soup.

Lucky for me, eggplant was on sale and the cauliflower was a beautiful, creamy white. No need to choose, I bought them both plus some greens, a couple of onions and garlic. I remembered the cilantro for curry but forgot the ginger root. And oops, the cheddar for the cauliflower soup. It’s tough to keep track when you shop without a list. A second trip to the supermarket and I was ready to spend a few afternoons in the kitchen.

Here’s how these marathons usually work. First, I get two or three interesting dishes or ideas stuck in my head. Then, I buy too much food. Next, I mull over ingredients and spices and whether to roast, braise, sauté or simmer. More often than not, it’s usually a combination.

At some point, the mulling stops and chopping begins. For the next few days, usually a weekend, I’ll cook enough to feed an army of foodies. As I put things together, I scribble out the list of ingredients and make notes of temperatures and timings. That’s one of the challenges of sharing recipes. You have to write them down.

On the other hand, the best part is inviting guinea pigs over to sample the results. Of course, they generally have to put up with a mini photoshoot. I like to photograph new recipes. Plus, not every dish is a brilliant success. Hopefully, the wine and company make up for any flops.

Wishing you a delicious 2019, stay warm and bon appétit!

Roasted Cauliflower-Cheddar Soup
What could be better than soup on a cold winter evening. Roasting the vegetables gives this soup a rich, deep flavor. Enjoy!
Serves 8

About 1 1/2 pounds cauliflower, trimmed and broken into florets
1-2 red potatoes, about 8 ounces, peeled and quartered
2 carrots, peeled and chopped
3 celery stalks, cut in thirds
1 large onion, cut in eighths
Olive oil
Apple cider vinegar
1 teaspoon thyme
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
8-12 cups chicken or vegetable stock or broth
1 cup half and half (optional)
1 bay leaf
About 6 ounces sharp white cheddar cheese, grated
Garnish: fresh chopped chives

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.

Put the vegetables in a large roasting pan, drizzle with enough equal parts olive oil and vinegar to lightly coat, sprinkle with thyme and season with salt and pepper. Toss to combine and coat.

Stirring and tossing 2-3 times, roast at 375 for about 30 minutes. Add 4 cups of stock, reduce the heat to 350 degrees and return to the oven for 15 minutes or until all the vegetables are tender. Remove from the oven and cool for about 30 minutes.

Working in batches, puree the vegetables with a little stock in a blender or food processor until smooth.

Put the cauliflower puree into a soup pot, add the remaining stock and bay leaf and place on the stovetop. Bring to a simmer over medium heat, reduce to low and simmer for 15 minutes. Stir in the half and half and cheddar and reheat to steaming.

If you have the time, cool to room temperature, cover and refrigerate for several hours or overnight. Reheat on medium low.

To serve: ladle the soup into bowls or mugs, garnish with chives and serve.

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One Year Ago – Dandan Noodles
Two Years Ago – Sweet Potato & Red Lentil Soup
Three Years Ago – Tomato Soup
Four Years Ago – Savory Galette with Spinach, Mushrooms & Manchego
Five Years Ago – Mac & Cheese with Roasted Broccoli & Sun-dried Tomatoes
Six Years Ago – Red Bean Chili with Pork & Butternut Squash
Seven Years Ago – Piri Piri Prawns
Eight Years Ago – French Lentil Soup
Nine Years Ago – Spicy Chicken (or Turkey) Noodle Soup
Ten Years Ago – My Favorite Chili

Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!

What are your favorite dishes to cook up on a cold winter day? Feel free to share!

Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook. © Susan W. Nye, 2019

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Twinkle, Twinkle Lights So Bright & Hearty Sausage Soup with Beans & Greens

When I was little, the holiday decorations in our yard never stopped traffic. Like the rest of the neighborhood, our display was pretty modest. A life-size Santa did not peek down our chimney. The entire house was not outlined in flashing bulbs. Instead, Mom put electric candles in the windows and hung a wreath with a big red bow on the front door. Then, under the watchful eyes of his two little girls, Dad untangled strings of colored bulbs. He carefully wound them around the rhododendrons that flanked the front stoop. Dad completed the tableau with a spot light aimed at Mom’s wreath. My sister Brenda and I generally pleaded for bigger and better but it was not to be.

My childhood fondness for holiday decorations was not limited to our front yard. One of my favorite Christmas rituals was driving around town to see the lights and decorations. Of course, I wasn’t doing the driving; I was only five. I was in the back seat with Brenda, our noses pressed against the windows A week or two before Christmas, usually with little or no warning, Mom and Dad loaded us into our big blue station wagon and the treasure hunt began.

After circling the neighborhood, we’d widen our net. Never satisfied, we’d twist and turn away from familiar streets in search of the best and the brightest. Our philosophy was the bigger the better. We gave no points for subtlety or quiet, tasteful decorations.

Bouncing from one side of the car to the other for a better view Brenda and I giggled, oohed and ahhed. Most houses sported a few strings of lights wrapped around bushes or a tree. Others were more extravagant with lights wound around front porch railings or along roof lines. We drove all over town in search of spectacular. The truly remarkable displays combined a ton of lights with life-size wooden cutouts of snowmen or Santa in his sleigh.

When it came to lights, we all had our favorites. Brenda and I preferred the big, fat multicolored bulbs. Big and brash we loved all that color. On the other hand, Mom liked the icy glow of all blue lights. Dad drove and more or less agreed with everyone.

To blink or not to blink was an annual topic of conversation. Far from a debate, we were all in agreement. To our shock and dismay, we’d turn the corner and face a riot of flashing color. To our New England eyes, there was done and overdone. Santa and eight reindeer on the roof elicited enthusiastic applause. Flashing lights got nothing more than a disgusted ugh.

About the time I started high school, I stumbled down the path of discreet, good taste. I no longer dreamed of a plywood snowman on our front lawn. I had no desire to encourage Dad to bring out the extension ladder and hang colorful bulbs along every edge of the house and roof.

Instead, I clamored for little white twinkle lights and was more than happy with the spot lit wreath. At about the same time, I noticed a few big, old colonials with small wreaths on every window. Oh my goodness, l thought they were fabulous. That said, I didn’t want to press my luck and kept my eye on the prize of little white lights. It took a few years to convince my parents. After all, what self-respecting frugal Yankee is going to toss out perfectly good decorations in order to replace them with some newfangled invention?

Enjoy the lights and bon appétit!

Hearty Sausage Soup with Beans & Greens
A hearty soup is the perfect supper after your lights tour or tree trimming, Enjoy!
Serves 8

Olive oil
1 large onion, chopped
3 carrots, chopped
3 stalks celery, chopped
1/4 teaspoon or to taste red pepper flakes
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
4 garlic cloves, minced
1 cup dry white wine
2 pounds precooked garlic sausage or smoked kielbasa, cut in bitesize pieces
About 3 cups cooked small white beans – 2 (15 ounce) cans or 8 ounces dried
1 piece Parmigiano-Reggiano rind* (optional)
3-4 sprigs fresh thyme
1 teaspoon finely chopped fresh rosemary
1 bay leaf
6-8 or more cups chicken stock or broth
1 pound baby kale or spinach
Parmesan Crostini (optional)
Grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese (optional)

Lightly coat a soup pot with olive oil and heat over medium. Add the onion, carrots and celery and season with pepper flakes, salt and pepper. Sauté until the onion is translucent, add the garlic and continue cooking for 2-3 minutes. Stir in the wine and simmer until reduced by half.

Add the sausage, beans, Parmigiano-Reggiano rind, thyme, rosemary and bay leaf. Add more or less stock depending how you like your soup – more like a stew or nice and soupy.  Bring everything to a boil, reduce the heat to low, cover and simmer for 20 minutes.

If you have the time, cool to room temperature, cover and refrigerate for several hours or overnight.

Stir in the spinach and simmer, uncovered, stirring occasionally, until the greens wilt, about 5 minutes. Remove the Parmigiano-Reggiano rind, thyme twigs and bay leaf, ladle into bowls or mugs, top with Parmesan Crostini, sprinkle with Parmigiano-Reggiano and serve.

* Adding a piece of Parmigiano-Reggiano rind will add flavor and richness to your soup. 

Parmesan Crostini
1/2-1 baguette, thinly sliced
Olive oil
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
Grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

Lightly brush both sides of each baguette slice with olive oil. Arrange the slices in a single layer on a baking sheet, season with salt and pepper, sprinkle with grated Parmigiano-Reggiano and bake until golden, about 15 minutes.

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One Year Ago – Roasted Shrimp with Rémoulade Sauce
Two Years Ago – Bûche de Noël
Three Years Ago – Roasted Beets with Sautéed Greens
Four Years Ago – Very Ginger Gingerbread Muffins
Five Years Ago – Ginger Shortbread
Six Years Ago – Baked French Toast
Seven Years Ago – Braised Lamb with Artichokes and Mushrooms and Creamy Polenta
Eight Years Ago – Mixed Greens with Roasted Grapes
Nine Years Ago – Savory Bread Pudding
Ten Years Ago – Triple Chocolate Parfait

Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!

What are you serving this Thanksgiving? Feel free to share!

Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook. © Susan W. Nye, 2018

#IWILLVOTE & Cheesy Roasted Cauliflower & White Bean Soup

It’s the midterms. A time in our democracy when too many people stay home and enjoy a nice cup of tea rather than head out to the polls. But not me, my mother made sure of that. Mom was a firm believer in the power of the vote. Maybe it was because her mother was born before the nineteenth amendment was passed. Moreover, her grandmother was well into her forties when she was able cast her first ballot. Either way, Mom realized it was a hard won right and not to be ignored.

However, not everyone has had the privilege of being my mother’s daughter, son, grandchild or great-grandchild. Without her good influence, whole bunches of people have found lots of reasons to skip the trip to the polls. Here are a few … and her probable retorts:

It’s too cold to go out.
So, what else is new? It’s always cold in New Hampshire in November. Put on a coat; don’t forget your gloves and a hat too. By the way, if you suddenly won tickets to a Patriots game – would you turn them down? I don’t think so.

It’s raining. I don’t want to get wet.
You must have an umbrella. Why do I know this? Easy, because I have at least a half dozen of them in all colors, shapes and sizes and most of them were free.

I don’t have time.
Depending on what you do and where you live, this one might have merit. For example, the day shift at the hospital runs from seven to seven. Those are the exact hours of our local polling station. However, you can stop by the town offices and pick up an absentee ballot. As for that other stuff – you can get your hair cut, your nails done and your car washed on Wednesday. If you have time to stand in line for a lottery ticket, you have time to stand in line to vote.

I have no idea who’s running? I only (sometimes) vote in presidential elections.
Mom wasn’t tech savvy but if she was – she would have told you to go to your computer, visit your town website and pull up a sample ballot. If you can’t find one there, Google NH 2018 midterm election for a list of candidates. Now, check out them out and learn about their policy positions. Vote for candidates who best align with your values.

Why bother? My vote doesn’t matter.
Now, here’s a funny thing – your vote actually does matter. The 2016 presidential election was determined by about 70,000 votes. Living in a small state, that might seem like a lot but think again. More than 135 million people voted in the 2016 election. The final outcome came down to 70,000 individuals who made the effort to get to their polling stations that day.

It’s all rigged.
Another funny thing, voter fraud is actually extremely rare. Yes, it makes a good sound bite at a rally or in a tweet but the facts don’t back it up. When you go to the polls, you can be confident that your vote will count and matter.

#IWILLVOTE on November 6. You can too. See you at the polls and bon appétit!

Cheesy Roasted Cauliflower & White Bean Soup
Reward your trip to the polls with a cozy mug or bowl of soup. Enjoy!
Makes about 4 quarts – freezes beautifully so don’t hesitate to make a double batch

Olive oil
About 4 ounces (4 slices) thick cut bacon, chopped
1 head (2-3 pounds) cauliflower, cut in bite-sized pieces and florets
2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
1 large onion, roughly chopped
2 carrots, chopped
2 garlic cloves
3-4 cups cooked small white beans (about 8 ounces dried beans or 2 15-ounce cans)
6-8 cups chicken stock or broth
2 teaspoons finely chopped rosemary
3-4 sprigs thyme and 1 bay leaf tied together with kitchen twine
2 cups half & half
2 ounces plus more for garnish Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, grated
2 ounces plus more for garnish Pecorino Romano cheese, grated

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.

Lightly coat a heavy skillet with olive oil and heat on medium. Add the bacon and sauté until crispy. Remove the bacon from the pan and reserve.

Put the cauliflower on 1-2 baking sheets, drizzle with 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar and enough bacon fat to lightly coat, season with salt and pepper and toss to combine. Roast the cauliflower at 375 degrees until tender, about 30 minutes.

If you like – set some of the roasted florets aside for garnish.

Put the onion, carrots and garlic on a baking sheet, drizzle with 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar and enough bacon fat to lightly coat, season with salt and pepper and toss to combine. Roast the vegetables at 375 degrees until tender, about 20 minutes.

Put the vegetables in a large soup pot, add the white beans, 6 cups stock and the herb bundle and bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to low, cover, and simmer, stirring occasionally for about 20 minutes.

Cool the soup for about 20 minutes. Remove the herb bundle, and, working in batches, puree the soup. Use a blender for very smooth soup or pulse in the food processor for a more rustic version. Return the soup to the pot and stir in the half-and-half.

If you have the time, cool the soup to room temperature and store in the refrigerator for several hours or overnight.

Stirring frequently, adding more stock if necessary, reheat the soup to steaming on medium. Stir in the cheeses and stir until the cheeses have melted and combined into the soup.

Ladle the soup into mugs or bowls, sprinkle with the reserved florets and bacon and serve. Pass more grated Parmigiano-Reggiano and Pecorino Romano for the cheese lovers.

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One Year Ago – Savory Smashed Sweet Potatoes
Two Years Ago – Creamy Polenta with Mushroom & Kale Ragù
Three Years Ago – Butternut Squash Crostini with Goat Cheese & Balsamic Reduction
Four Years Ago – Moroccan Spiced Vegetables & Chickpeas with Couscous
Five Years Ago – Smashed or Mashed Potatoes
Six Years Ago – Apple Muffins
Seven Years Ago – Mixed Greens with Warm Roasted Squash
Eight Years Ago – Spinach Ricotta Pie
Nine Years Ago – Seared Scallops with Lentils
Ten Years Ago – Tomato, Olive & Feta Tart

Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!

What’s your favorite cozy soup on a chilly day? Feel free to share!

Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook. © Susan W. Nye, 2018

Namaste & Spicy Shrimp, Corn and Coconut Soup

I’m guessing that most all of my family, friends and acquaintances know about my daily walk around Pleasant Lake. A whole lot of other people probably know about it too. Not only do I mention these daily walks in this column from time to time but more than a few vehicles pass me as I make my way around. Take for instance, the school bus, all those plumbers vans and more than a couple trucks of trucks. As they pass me, I wave and the drivers usually wave back.

What you probably don’t know is that I also take a yoga class. It’s not a daily thing. Although for a little while, I was doing a couple of sun salutations every morning. However, it’s been quite a while since I gave a morning salute. These days, I pretend I don’t have time. Truth be told, I just haven’t made it a priority.

Once a week, I do make it a priority to throw on my yoga pants, grab my mat and get ready to stretch, bend and glide through an hour. Well, two of those things are sort-of but not really true. I did not go to the yoga pant store or even online. Instead, I found a pair of leggings tucked away in the shampoo and vitamin aisle at the supermarket. They’re mostly cotton and very comfortable. So comfortable in fact that I went back and bought some more. Once the weather turns cool, they are my hanging-out-at-home pants of choice. The other not quite true thing is, well, I don’t really glide. I can more or less hold my own with the bending and stretching but, try as I might, I tend to lurch more than glide.

If you’ve been thinking that you might like to take up yoga, there are lots of good reasons. Some are much too technical for me for me to explain let alone believe. So, here’s what I can say about my practice:

Yoga helps with balance … anyone who lives anywhere with an icy, snowy winter knows that balance is important. I suppose, the older I get, the more important good balance is. Plus, it’s fun to show off and stand on one leg in front of non-yogi friends.

Yoga helps me stay limber … my mom was a wonderful person and I love her dearly. However, arthritis is part of her legacy. (Running took its toll as well.) Yoga is great for deep stretching and bending and working all the little kinks out.

Yoga helps me build strength … with all the walking (and before that running), I have very strong legs. However, a number of smart people have been telling me for years that I need to develop better upper body strength. Yoga does that for me. Along with my arms and shoulders, it helps build my core muscles. Increasing core strength has been wonderful for the arthritis in my back.

Yoga helps me find peace and focus … to-do lists, telephones, texts, email, social media – they are all there, all the time. Together, they tag team to successfully distract and sometimes distress. However, for one hour each week, I can relax and focus on bending, stretching and, yes, lurching from one move to the next. Any noise in my head is stilled while I focus on that little spot on the floor, stand on one leg and find peace.

If you search for them, you can find one hundred reasons to take up yoga. From regulating your adrenal gland to weight loss. Like I already mentioned, some, make that most, of those reasons are too technical for me for me to explain let alone believe.

Namaste and bon appétit!

Spicy Shrimp, Corn and Coconut Soup
The local harvest is at its peak. It’s time to fire up the grill and make delicious magic with some of my favorite vegetables. Enjoy!
Serves 8

6-8 ears yellow or bicolor corn
Olive oil
About 1/2 red onion, finely chopped
1 carrot, finely chopped
4 garlic cloves, minced
1 (2-inch) piece ginger, peeled and minced
1 jalapeno or serrano pepper, stemmed, seeded and minced
1 teaspoon cumin
1/2 teaspoon coriander
About 12 ounces red potatoes, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch cubes
Sea salt to taste
2 quarts shrimp, vegetable or chicken broth or a mix
3 cups (2 15-ounce cans) unsweetened coconut milk
2 pounds medium shrimp, peeled and deveined
Zest and juice of 1 lime
Garnish: cilantro leaves, unsweetened toasted coconut flakes and/or chopped toasted peanuts

Cut the corn kernels off the cobs and transfer to a bowl. Use the back of a dinner knife to scrape the cobs and release the milky juices into another bowl. Set aside.

Lightly coat a soup kettle with olive oil and heat on medium. Add the onion, garlic, ginger and jalapeno, sprinkle with cumin and coriander and sauté until tender, about 5 minutes. Add the potato pieces and corn juices, season with salt, toss to combine and cook, stirring, for 2-3 minutes.

Add the broth and coconut milk, bring to a boil and reduce the heat to low. Cover and simmer the soup for about 8 minutes or until the potatoes are tender. If you like, remove from the heat and use a potato masher or fork to lightly smash the potatoes.

Raise the heat and return the soup to a boil, add the shrimp and corn, season with salt and stir to combine. When the soup returns to a simmer, reduce the heat, cover and simmer for 2-3 minutes or until the shrimp is cooked through and pink.

Add the lime juice and zest and stir to combine. Ladle the soup into bowls, garnish with cilantro, coconut flakes and/or peanuts and serve.

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One Year Ago – Hoisin Pork Ribs
Two Years Ago – Curried Carrot Soup
Three Years Ago – Warm Gorgonzola with Caramelized Onions & Walnuts
Four Years Ago – Baked Haddock with Fresh Tomatoes & Herbs
Five Years Ago – Pumpkin-Ginger Muffins
Six Years Ago – Roast Pork with Apples & Onions
Seven Years Ago – Lemon Roasted Salmon with Beurre Blanc
Eight Years Ago – Wild Mushroom Soup
Nine Years Ago – Rustic Apple Tart
Ten Years Ago – Oktoberfest Sausages & Sauerkraut

Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!

How do you keep fit? Feel free to share!

Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook. © Susan W. Nye, 2018

Okay, I think Fall May Finally Be Here Weekend Special

If nothing else, the recent heat wave has allowed us to chime in one last time with “Hot enough for you.” It’s also given me a few delightful evenings down on Pleasant Lake. Unless each and every one of those weather guys are wrong, fall is finally coming this weekend.

Don’t despair the end of hot weather. After all, it’s sweater weather. We won’t need too many layers of down and fleece for a while yet. Take a hike or ride your bike through the countryside. The sunshine is golden and the leaves are starting to turn.

Invite you hiking and biking friends back for dinner. The bounty at the farmstand is fabulous and it promises to be a beautiful weekend. Suggest everyone bring a sweater and enjoy cocktails on the deck before dinner. (You might even sit around the fire pit for an after dinner coffee or cognac.) Here are a few suggestions an early fall dinner:

Start with a glass of wine and an appetizer inspired by the changing season. I don’t know about you but green tomatoes make me think of early fall. Why? Well, early in the summer, I know that they have plenty of time to ripen into big, fat, red tomatoes. As we slip into October, days are shorter, nights are cooler and those tomatoes are running out of time. For a summer’s over (sigh) treat, there is nothing better than Fried Green Tomatoes with Chipotle Crema. They’re great as a side dish and delicious as an appetizer.

Sit down to the table with a beautiful salad. The farmstand had a virtual rainbow of beets on display yesterday. They will be beautiful in my Roasted Beets with Goat Cheese Salad. However, since I still don’t have an oven, I left them all for you!

 

Now, for the main course. Nothing says cozy on a cool evening like soup. Unlike a traditional New England chowder, my End of Summer Soup with Corn & White Beans takes advantage of two favorite veggies – corn and tomatoes.

Cap your meal with a beautiful dessert. For a sweet finish, try my Applesauce Cake with Brown Butter Icing . Along with the beets, corn and tomatoes, there are local apples waiting for you … to pick or pick up at the farmstand.

 

 

Have a great weekend and bon appétit!

For a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog Click Here!!

What’s up with you this weekend? I’d love to hear from you! Let’s get a conversation going. To make a comment, just click on Comments below.

Want more? Click here for more seasonal menus! © Susan W. Nye, 2017

Still Nursing that Cold Weekend Special

stirring_the_potEarlier this week, I let everyone know that a cold had taken up residency in my chest and head. Well, it’s hunkered down and still there. I’m not sure how the weekend will pan out but I am hoping to join the Women’s March in Concord on Saturday. Whether I throw the covers over my head and cough my way through the weekend or feel well enough to head out and about, I’m going to need soup!

If you do too, here are a few ideas:

For many, Nana’s chicken soup is the only real cure for a cold. I hope you’ll consider one of my spiced up versions. My Spicy Chicken Noodle Soup and Curried Thai Soup with Noodles, Turkey (or Chicken) & Vegetables are both good choices.

For a different take on noodle soup, stir up a batch of my Raviolis in Broth with Turkey Meatballs & Greens or Tortellini en Brodo con Spinaci.

Not into noodles? How about my Mexican Chicken Soup?

Or think super foods with my Sweet Potato & Red Lentil Soup. It’s may be just the thing to build you back up.

Stay well and have a good weekend! Bon appétit!

For a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog Click Here!!

How are you spending the long holiday weekend? I’d love to hear from you! Let’s get a conversation going. To make a comment, just click on Comments below.

Want more? Click here for more seasonal menus! © Susan W. Nye, 2017

Feed a Cold? Sweet Potato & Red Lentil Soup

slippers_02As the last few days have progressed, it has become increasingly clear that a cold has finagled its way into my head and chest. If there is any doubt, I’ve got the cough, aches and pains to prove it. It’s all my dad’s fault. Yah, yah, I know, when in doubt blame the parents. In this case, it really is his fault. It was his cold to begin with.

Three or four years ago, my now ninety-year-old father moved the few miles between the house I grew up in and the one I live in now. As roommates go, he’s not a bad sort. We are two messy-messers but we agreed to hire someone to clean one morning a week. We both adore Sarah and Dad is very fond of my cooking.

Dad is remarkably hale and hearty and claims he never gets sick. That’s interesting (for lack of a better word) because he was recovering from a very serious illness when he moved down here. On top of that, over the past five years, he’s made numerous ambulance trips and spent more than a handful of nights at both New London Hospital and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. But as I like to say, “He’s ninety and good at it.”

After fighting a bit of a head cold for several days, the bug moved down into Dad’s chest. (It also jumped across the dinner table and into me.) A trip to the doctor and a dose of antibiotics seemed to slow it down; at least for a day or two. Unfortunately, Dad’s improvement was short-lived.

I guess I should have known. After all, it has been more than six months since his last hospital stay. Obviously, Dad was overdue for a visit with the EMTs, a ride in the ambulance and a few days in the hospital. As robust and healthy as he is, his chest cold had escalated into pneumonia. Let’s not forget, he is ninety (and he’s good at it.)

Perhaps if the nurses and LNAs weren’t so nice to him, he’d decide it wasn’t worth the trip. For his part, Dad charms the staff and they can’t help but be nice to him in return. Regardless of Dad’s charm, these women and men are phenomenal, as kind and caring as they are professional.

Anyway, as I started to say, between work and visits to the hospital, I’ve been nursing my own cold. Only problem, I can never remember, do you feed a cold or starve it. The same goes with a fever. And what the heck do you do if you have both a cold and a fever? Since I lost my thermometer more than a few years ago, I guess I don’t have to worry about that one. When in doubt, assume 98.6.

Since Dad comes home tomorrow, I’ll soon have two colds to worry about. I think I’ll go with feeding. A nice hot mug of soup sounds like a delicious cure for the sniffles.

Here’s to good health and bon appétit!

Sweet Potato & Red Lentil Soup
There is nothing like a mug of soup when you have a cold. Let the steam open your sinuses and the hearty goodness warm and heal you. Enjoy!
sweet_potato_red_lentil_soup_05Makes about 4 quarts

2 (about 1 1/2 pounds) sweet potatoes
Olive oil
2-3 stalks celery, finely chopped
2 carrots, finely chopped
1 large onion, finely chopped
2 teaspoons ground cumin
1 teaspoon ground coriander
3-4 garlic cloves, minced
1 (1-inch) piece fresh ginger, minced
1 teaspoon or to taste sriracha
2 cups red lentils
8-10 cups vegetable or chicken stock
3 sprigs fresh thyme
1 bay leaf
Sea salt to taste
1 3/4 cup unsweetened coconut milk
Grate zest and juice of 1 lime
Garnish: fresh chopped cilantro

Put the rack in the center of the oven and preheat oven to 450 degrees.

Prick the sweet potatoes with a sharp knife. Bake at 450 degrees on a baking sheet until soft, 1–1 1/2 hours.

While the sweet potatoes bake, heat a little olive oil in a soup kettle over medium-high. Add the onion, celery and carrot, season with cumin and coriander and sauté until the onion is translucent. Add the garlic, ginger and sriracha, and sauté for 2-3 minutes more.

Put the lentils in a sieve and rinse under cold, running water. Drain the lentils and add them to the vegetables and stir to coat and combine. Add 8 cups stock and the herbs, raise the heat and bring to a boil. Cover, reduce the heat to very low and simmer the lentils for 30 minutes or until very tender. Season with salt.

As soon as they are cool enough to handle, halve the sweet potatoes, scoop out the flesh and it add to the lentils. Use a potato masher to break up the sweet potatoes and mix them into the soup. Or for a smoother soup, remove the bay leaf and thyme twigs and puree the soup with a handheld immersion blender or in the food processor .

Add the coconut milk and more stock if necessary to reach the desired consistency.

Can be made ahead to this point, covered, cooled to room temperature and refrigerated.

Reheat the soup to steaming, stir in the lime zest and juice, ladle into bowls and garnish with chopped cilantro.

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One Year Ago – Tomato Soup
Two Years Ago – Savory Galette with Spinach, Mushrooms & Manchego
Three Years Ago – Mac & Cheese with Roasted Broccoli & Sun-dried Tomatoes
Four Years Ago – Red Bean Chili with Pork & Butternut Squash
Five Years Ago – Piri Piri Prawns
Six Years Ago – French Lentil Soup
Seven Years Ago – Spicy Chicken (or Turkey) Noodle Soup
Eight Years Ago – My Favorite Chili

Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!

What about you? What are your New Year’s resolutions? Feel free to share!

Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook. © Susan W. Nye, 2017