Twenty-Seven Reasons to be Thankful & Turkey Tetrazzini

Forget Disneyland, Finland is the happiest place on earth. Yes, Finland. It seems the United Nations researches a bunch of countries every year and ranks them on happiness. One might assume that warm, sunny countries are the happiest. One would be wrong. During the dark days of December, Finland averages less than six hours of sun. In fact, every one of the top five – Finland, Denmark, Norway, Iceland and The Netherlands – are all well north of the equator.

Happiness is a lot about attitude. Winter days may be short but Finland can thank its lucky stars and hard work for many things. Starting with a healthy life expectancy, the Finns enjoy decent incomes along with a country and culture built on freedom, trust, social support and generosity.

Okay then, we might not be Finland but there is still a whole heap of stuff that can make us happy and fill us with gratitude.

Let hear it for …

  1. An average of nine hours of sun in December.
  2. Indoor plumbing.
  3. Electricity.
  4. Zippers.
  5. Yoga pants.
  6. A warm winter jacket.
  7. Snow boots.
  8. Warm socks.
  9. Finding a ten dollar bill in your back pocket.
  10. An internet connection and the hours of joy-filled procrastination it brings checking out Facebook and watching laughing baby videos.
  11. The vote.
  12. A warm bed.
  13. A funny story.
  14. Fresh air.
  15. Clean water.
  16. An education.
  17. A good hair day.
  18. A little black dress.
  19. A great book, even a good book.
  20. A great movie, even a good movie.
  21. The sense of accomplishment you get from fixing something – anything … a drippy faucet, a gnarly stain in a favorite shirt, a formatting glitch in a document …
  22. Finding a great anything on sale.
  23. Toothbrushes.
  24. A snow day.
  25. A delicious dinner with people you love.
  26. Friends.
  27. Even when they drive you crazy, family around the Thanksgiving table.

And that’s just for starters … Happy Thanksgiving and bon appétit!

Turkey Tetrazzini

Perhaps I should have added Thanksgiving leftovers to the list. Most tetrazzini has peas, I prefer spinach and, so, make the swap. Feel free to swap back. Enjoy!

Serves 8

  • Béchamel Sauce (recipe follows)
  • 1 cup sour cream
  • 1/2 cup dry white wine
  • 2 teaspoons dried Italian herbs
  • About 4 ounces (2 cups) freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese
  • Olive oil
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 1 pound mushrooms, trimmed and chopped
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 4 cups bite sized pieces cooked turkey
  • 1 – 1 1/2 pounds frozen chopped spinach, thawed and well drained
  • 12-16 ounces spaghetti
  • 1/2 cup panko breadcrumbs

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Lightly butter a large casserole.

Make the Béchamel Sauce. (Recipe follows.) Whisking frequently, cool the sauce in the pan for 10-15 minutes.

Put the sour cream, white wine and 1 1/2 teaspoons Italian herbs in a large bowl and whisk to combine. A little at a time, whisk the Béchamel Sauce into the sour cream. Add 1 cup grated Parmigiano-Reggiano and whisk to combine.

Meanwhile, lightly coat a skillet with olive oil, add the onion and mushrooms, season with salt and pepper and sauté until the onion is translucent. Add the garlic and sauté for about 3 minutes more.

Cook the pasta according to package directions, less 1 minute, and drain.

Add the turkey, sautéed vegetables, spinach and pasta to the sauce and toss to combine. Transfer everything to the prepared baking dish.

Put the breadcrumbs and remaining Parmigiano-Reggiano and herbs in a bowl, season with salt and pepper and whisk to combine. Drizzle with a little olive oil and whisk again. Sprinkle the casserole with the cheesy breadcrumbs.

Can be made ahead to this point, covered and refrigerated. Bring to room temperature before baking.

Bake the casserole at 375 degrees until piping hot and golden, about 45 minutes. If it browns too quickly, lightly cover with aluminum foil.

Béchamel Sauce

  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • 4 1/2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 3 cups whole milk
  • 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper

Melt the butter in a heavy saucepan over medium heat. Add the flour and cook, whisking continuously, for 1 minute. Gradually whisk in the milk. Bring to a simmer over medium-high heat. Reduce the heat to low and simmer, whisking often, until the sauce thickens slightly, about 5 minutes. Whisk in the nutmeg and add salt and pepper to taste.

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What are you grateful for this Thanksgiving? Feel free to share!

Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook. © Susan W. Nye, 2019

The Ten Days of Thanksgiving & Stuffed Winter Squash

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, Thanksgiving is marathon; not a sprint. I love surrounding my table with family and friends on Thanksgiving. However, this annual gastronomic extravaganza only works because I pace myself. As of this minute, there are ten days until Thanksgiving. For anyone who’s cooking this year, here are ten tips to get you from here to there in one piece.

On the FIRST day of Thanksgiving – that’s today – finalize your guest list but assume there could be last-minute additions or changes. While you’re at it, find out about food allergies or issues. If you haven’t done it yet, order the turkey

To anyone alone this Thanksgiving: let friends and neighbors know. Assuming you are a decent sort, one or more will be delighted to invite you … but they can’t if they don’t know of your predicament.

On the SECOND day of Thanksgiving – finalize your menu. If you’re having trouble deciding how to cook the spuds or whether to bother with creamed onions, stop dithering. Now is also a good time to decide how you want to handle those food allergies and issues.

 

My attitude – except for real allergies, true health issues and deeply held beliefs, don’t worry about it. Twenty years ago, the Atkins diet was all the rage. Trend followers then demanded gluten-free everything before moving on paleo eating and keto. Omnivore, carnivore, pescatarian, vegetarian, vegan – it’s one dinner. There’ll be loads of delicious food to pick and choose. Relax, no one will starve.

On the THIRD day of Thanksgiving – create your detailed shopping list; actually, two detailed lists. The first list includes anything with a week to ten-day or longer shelf life. The second covers everything else, including the turkey.

On the FOURTH day of Thanksgiving – shop for everything on list number one.

On the FIFTH day of Thanksgiving – make soup. Try one of my Thanksgiving favorites; butternut squash or mushroom. Both soups freeze beautifully. Spend the afternoon making as many quarts as you can stuff into your freezer. Enjoy some on Thanksgiving and the rest on a cold winter night.

On the SIXTH day of Thanksgiving – track down all your serving dishes and set the table. Make and freeze pie dough.

On the SEVENTH day of Thanksgiving – make the cranberry sauce. Yes, it IS much better than the canned stuff and takes very little time and effort. Due for a change? Try cranberry chutney.

On the EIGHTH day of Thanksgiving – pick up the turkey and everything else on list number two.

On the NINTH day of Thanksgiving – take the day off from work and anything else. Tomorrow’s the big day; it’s time to get cooking. Prep the stuffing, make the side dishes and bake pies.

On the TENTH day of Thanksgiving – Make or finish any of the side dishes and desserts that didn’t get done on Wednesday. Stuff the turkey and pop it in the oven. Take a long walk and relax.

Happy Turkey Day and bon appétit!

Stuffed Winter Squash

Delicious as a side for omnivores or a festive Thanksgiving main dish for vegetarians. Enjoy!

Serves 6 as a main and 12 as a side dish

  • 3 (12-16 ounce) delicata, sweet dumpling or acorn squash
  • Olive oil
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 1/4 cup brown rice
  • 1/4 cup wild rice
  • 1/4 cup quinoa
  • 1 pound mushrooms, trimmed and chopped
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 2 carrots finely chopped
  • 2 stalks celery, finely chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons thyme
  • 1 teaspoon sage
  • 1/2 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • 12-16 ounces baby spinach
  • 1 cup chopped walnuts
  • 8 ounces cheddar cheese, shredded (optional)
  • 2 ounces Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, grated (optional)
  • 1/2 cup panko breadcrumbs

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Cut the squash in half lengthwise and remove the seeds. If serving as a side dish, cut the halves in half. Brush the flesh side of the squash with a little olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Roast the squash cut side down at 375 degrees until tender, 20-30 minutes. Remove from the oven and reserve.

Put the rice in a fine mesh sieve and rinse well under cold water. Put 1 3/4 cups water in a pot and bring to a boil. Add the rice and cook for 30 minutes.

Put the quinoa in a fine mesh sieve and rinse well under cold water. Add the quinoa to the rice and cook 10-15 minutes more or until the grains are tender. Remove from the heat and reserve.

Meanwhile, lightly coat a large skillet with olive oil and heat on medium. Add the mushrooms, onion, carrots and celery, sprinkle with 1 teaspoon thyme, the sage and smoked paprika, season with salt and pepper and cook, stirring frequently, until lightly browned. Add the garlic and cook 2-3 minutes more. Add the spinach and toss until wilted. Remove from the heat.

Add the grains and nuts to the vegetables and toss to combine. Cool to room temperature, add the cheddar and toss to combine. Arrange the squash in a lightly oiled baking dish and spoon the vegetable mixture into the squash cavities.

Put the Parmigiano-Reggiano, breadcrumbs and remaining thyme in a bowl, season with salt and pepper and toss to combine. Drizzle with a little olive oil and toss again. Sprinkle the tops of stuffed squash with the cheesy breadcrumbs.

Can be made ahead to this point, covered and refrigerated. Bring to room temperature before baking.

Bake uncovered at 375 degrees until piping hot and lightly browned, about 30 minutes. Transfer to a serving platter or individual plates and serve.

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Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook. © Susan W. Nye, 2019

Getting Ready to Give Thanks & Roasted Brussels Sprouts & Sweet Potatoes

There is a light at the end of the Blahvember tunnel. Dull or shining, that light is Thanksgiving and it will be here in just a few short weeks. Nothing beats Thanksgiving for inspiring both gratitude and conflict. Think about it. What other holiday inspires joy in some while unleashing fear or dread in others? Host or guest, it doesn’t matter – contrary feelings persist around tables across America.

Thanksgiving fans embrace the day. A good many of them love to cook. For those that prefer life outside the kitchen, they have workarounds like potlucks and restaurants. No matter the circumstance or place, Thanksgiving fans are absolutely delighted to spend the holiday with a tableful of friends and family.

To both borrow and mangle a line from W.C. Fields, Thanksgiving detractors would rather be in Philadelphia. For them, Thanksgiving is a highly combustible gathering of gripes and grumbles. Siblings, cousins, ex-s and in-laws, these relationships can be fraught with rivalry, disdain or both. Add a few too many glasses of wine and an explosion of one kind or another is more or less guaranteed.

Now, it’s upon us. Whether you meant to or not, you raised your hand over Labor Day weekend and agreed to host Turkey Day. That means, it’s time to get organized. And no, you can’t go back and pretend you were kidding or swatting a nonexistent mosquito.

Start by letting everyone know that Thanksgiving is still on and you’re still hosting. Give them an arrival time and turn a deaf ear to complaints. It’s an age-old fact, no matter what time you choose, afternoon – early or late – or wait until evening, some big football game will kick off at just the wrong minute. Ignore the complaints, cue the DVR and have a lovely dinner. By the way, it’s always nice to encourage your guests to bring along any Thanksgiving orphans.

Invitations done; the menu is next. Unless of course, you have one of those families. You know the type. They insist on the same menu every year. A few might even admit that they don’t really like great-grandma Annabel’s stuffing or great-great-aunt Betty’s yams. They just like the sense of tradition that a decades old menu brings.

My family is one of those types. If it wasn’t on Nana’s Thanksgiving table, they don’t particularly want it on theirs. Except for me. Makes you wonder; was I somehow switched at birth? Anyway, I haven’t exactly ignored them – just reinvented an old dish or three. Okay, maybe I have ignored them but I like to think of it as gently nudging my nearest and dearest out of an antiquated food rut.

My reinventions are not all that dramatic. Instead of boiling, I roast the vegetables and have amped up the decadence on the smashed potatoes. No one but no one is complaining about the spuds. That said, although he loves my Roasted Butternut Soup, my brother is still accusing me of heresy for dropping Mom’s stuffing. On a more positive note, everyone seems delighted that pumpkin cheesecake has replaced pie.

If you’ve hesitated to change things up, stop worrying. While they may threaten, your family won’t disown you over a few Brussels sprouts.

Happy planning, happy cooking and bon appétit!

Roasted Brussels Sprouts & Sweet Potatoes

Brussels sprouts and sweet potatoes were not part of my childhood Thanksgiving. However, I like them as does about half of my family. So, last year, I added them to our Thanksgiving table. Enjoy!

Serves 8

  • 12 ounces thick cut bacon, cut in small pieces*
  • About 2 pounds Brussels sprouts, trimmed and quartered
  • About 2 pounds sweet potatoes, peeled and cut in 1/2-inch cubes
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • Apple cider vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon thyme
  • 1 teaspoon sage
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1-2 cups chicken or vegetable broth
  • About 1/2 cup chopped walnuts, toasted

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.

Heat a skillet with over medium, add the bacon and cook until it starts to brown. Remove from the pan and reserve. Reserve the rendered bacon fat as well.

Put the Brussels sprouts, sweet potatoes and onion in a roasting pan, drizzle with enough equal parts bacon fat and vinegar to lightly coat and toss to combine. Sprinkle with thyme and sage, season with salt and pepper and toss again.

Tossing at the midpoint, roast the vegetables at 375 degrees for 30 minutes. Add the bacon, garlic and chicken broth, toss to combine and roast for 15 minutes. Give the vegetables another toss and continue roasting until tender, another 10-15 minutes

Transfer the vegetables to a serving bowl, sprinkle with toasted walnuts and serve.

*  If you have a few vegetarians at your table, you may want to skip the bacon. Instead of bacon fat, toss the veggies in olive oil. Along with the toasted walnuts, sprinkle with grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese and serve.

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Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook. © Susan W. Nye, 2019

Thank Goodness for Leftovers Special

If dinner was at your house yesterday, your refrigerator is probably overflowing with Thanksgiving leftovers. So – what are you going to do with all that food? Let’s start with turkey stock. If you didn’t do it already, then tomorrow morning is a good a time as any.

I’m guessing that after a few turkey sandwiches, you’ll start asking … what the heck do I do with all this turkey? While the stock simmers, you might also want to organize the rest of the leftovers. If you have room in the freezer, you won’t have to cook for a week, maybe two. Here are a few suggestions:

Of course there is everyone’s favorite … soup:


With noodles of course and in a variety of flavors to avoid boredom. Vegetables lovers will want to try my Turkey Noodle Soup with Spinach. If you like a little spice, then my My Favorite Spicy Chicken (or Turkey) Noodle Soup will be perfect. No? Then how about a taste of Asia with Curried Thai Soup with Noodles, Turkey & Vegetables ?

Just not feeling very soupy? How about:

Tossing up some turkey and veggies in a variety of different and interesting dishes. My latest suggestion is Spaghetti con Tacchino e Broccoli (Spaghetti with Turkey & Broccoli). However, Leftover Turkey Stir Fry and Black Friday Enchiladas (Turkey & Black Beans Enchiladas) are good choices too.

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If the cold weather has you thinking of casseroles, then how about Cheesy Gratin with Thanksgiving Leftovers, Cheesy Chicken & Broccoli Pasta Bake (swap out the chicken with leftover turkey) or Poverty Casserole (swap out the sausage with leftover turkey). On the other hand, Pumpkin Chili with Turkey & Black Beans (replace the ground turkey with bite sized pieces of leftover turkey) will be delicious on a snowy night.

If you love roasted vegetables, there’s a chance you made too many. Regardless of the mix – butternut squash, carrots, parsnips, beets or whatever … you can whirl them into soup – use my Roasted Butternut Squash Soup recipe as a guide. Or pile them onto crostini and top with Goat Cheese & Balsamic Reduction. Try them in salad of Kale and Radicchio.

Any and all your roasted veggies will be delicious with Ravioli and Brown Butter, layered in Lasagna or stirred into Risotto.

Have a great weekend! Bon appétit!

For a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog Click Here!!

How are you spending the long holiday weekend? I’d love to hear from you! Let’s get a conversation going. To make a comment, just click on Comments below.

Want more? Click here for more seasonal menus! © Susan W. Nye, 2018

Being Thankful & Spaghetti con Tacchino e Broccoli (Spaghetti with Turkey & Broccoli)

Still not sure about one or more dishes for your Thanksgiving feast? Okay then, before you start reading … ..if you are looking for Thanksgiving menus, click here. On the other hand, if you’d rather build your own menu by picking and choosing from a long list of Thanksgiving-friendly recipes, that list is here.

November is a dreary month. Most days dawn cold and rainy – or snowy. However, all is not lost; the month is saved by Thanksgiving. We can take comfort in the knowledge that family and friends will gather together at the end of the month. With a fabulous, harvest feast a few short days away, I can’t help but be a bit reflective. Alright, I admit it; my head is filled with thoughts and images of Thanksgivings past.

Early Thanksgiving dinners were at my grandmothers’ houses. Dressed in our Sunday best, we’d arrive around noontime. As cooks go, Nana Nye was the better of the two but it was hardly a contest. Nana Westland didn’t care one wit. She was more than happy to have Grandpa take us all out for Thanksgiving dinner.

I am thankful for my memories of these two very different women. I count myself lucky and grateful that all four of my grandparents were around throughout my childhood and well into my twenties.

After a couple of disastrous Thanksgivings in noisy, overcrowded restaurants, Mom put her foot down. She announced that she was cooking Thanksgiving dinner. Her mother and mother-in-law could bring a dish if they liked. It would be welcomed but wasn’t necessary. Now, Nana Nye was a staunch supporter of Cape Cod turnip. Unable to imagine a Thanksgiving dinner without it, she always mashed up a batch and brought it along. Since Nana Westland spent as little time as possible in the kitchen, she sent Grandpa to Captain Marden’s to pick up a couple of pounds of shrimp for the cocktail hour.

I am thankful that every year, without fail, Dad will ask if Cape Cod turnip is on the menu. It always makes me laugh. He also brings shrimp. Both are lovely reminders of my two grandmothers.

Like her mother, Mom didn’t really like to cook but she embraced Thanksgiving dinner with enthusiasm. No, she didn’t get all fancy and gourmet. We didn’t have tamarind glazed turkey or roasted carrots drizzled with tahini sauce. Her menu was the epitome of New England cooking.

I am thankful that I grew up with a mother full of good cheer, life and energy. Her exuberance made every holiday special.

Mom’s first Thanksgiving culinary coup left an indelible reminder of her spirited approach to the family feast. Mom chopped up an apple and threw it in the stuffing. As far as she was concerned, it was a culinary miracle and she was absolutely delighted with herself.

I am thankful for all the little things that tie us together as a family – like Mom’s Stuffing with the Apple. Yes, that is what we call it.

As popular as her stuffing was, Mom decided it wasn’t enough. Perhaps she was worried that we’d run out of food because she kept adding dishes. Oyster dressing, creamed onions and pecan pie joined the already groaning table.

I am thankful for Mom’s example of updating and evolving our New England traditions. I am even more thankful that Campbell’s green bean casserole never found its way onto our Thanksgiving table.

Have a wonderful Thanksgiving and bon appétit!

Spaghetti con Tacchino e Broccoli (Spaghetti with Turkey & Broccoli)
When you can’t eat another turkey sandwich, it’s time for a change of taste. Reinvent your leftover turkey with broccoli and spaghetti tossed with a generous hint of lemon, garlic and red pepper. Enjoy!
Serves 8

About 1 1/2 pounds broccoli, cut in bite-sized florets and pieces
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
1 pound spaghetti
1/4 cup dry white wine
3 tablespoons olive oil
3 tablespoons butter
4 cloves garlic, minced
2 teaspoons anchovy paste
1 teaspoon Italian herbs
1/2 teaspoon or to taste crushed red pepper
Grated zest and juice of 1 lemon
2 cups bite-size pieces leftover turkey
1 ounce plus more to pass Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, grated
1 ounce plus more to pass Pecorino Romano cheese, grated

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil, add the pasta and cook according to package directions less about 1 minute. About 5 minutes before the pasta is due to be done, add the broccoli.

While the pasta and broccoli cook, put the wine, olive oil, butter, garlic, anchovy paste, herbs and pepper flakes in a large skillet and, whisking frequently, cook on low. Remove from the heat when the garlic is fragrant and pale brown. Do not overcook. Sprinkle with lemon zest, drizzle with lemon juice and whisk again.

Reserving a little pasta water, drain the spaghetti and broccoli.

Add the pasta, broccoli and turkey to the garlic and toss to combine. Sprinkle with the grated cheeses, stir in a little pasta water and toss again. Cover and cook on medium for 1-2 minutes to combine the flavors.

Transfer to a deep serving platter or individual shallow bowls and serve with more grated cheeses.

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One Year Ago – Kale & Radicchio Salad with Roasted Butternut Squash
Two Years Ago – Homemade Butternut Squash Ravioli with Browned Butter
Three Years Ago – Thanksgiving Leftovers
Four Years Ago – Cranberry Clafoutis
Five Years Ago – Black Friday Enchiladas (Enchiladas with Turkey & Black Beans)
Six Years Ago – Snowy Pecan Balls
Seven Years Ago – Chocolate Truffles
Eight Years Ago – Smoked Salmon Mousse
Nine Years Ago – Roasted Beans
Ten Years Ago – Winter Soup with Pasta, Beans & Greens

Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!

How do you use up those yummy Thanksgiving leftovers? Feel free to share!

Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook. © Susan W. Nye, 2018

Thanksgiving – Still a Marathon & Roasted Sweet Dumpling Squash

Before you start reading …
..if you are looking for Thanksgiving menus, click here. On the other hand, if you’d rather build your own menu by picking and choosing from a long list of Thanksgiving-friendly recipes, that list is here.

Recently a friend reminded me of a piece of advice she’d once received from a food writer. She noted that the timing had been uncanny. In the run up to Thanksgiving, her guest list kept growing. From six to nine and then another four and another two. There seemed to be no end to hungry friends and family looking for a spot to land. If you haven’t guessed already, the food writer was me. The advice? Thanksgiving is not a sprint; it’s a marathon.

I developed this philosophy ages ago. Over the years, I’ve thrown a bunch of Thanksgiving dinners. At least a handful of times, I was both surprised and pleased that every single invitation was accepted – and then some. No one had a conflict, another commitment or somewhere else to be. Not only that, they all seemed to have a brother or cousin or old family friend in town.

Cooking dinner for twenty in a tiny kitchen, leaves you with two choices. Freak out or pace yourself. I chose to pace myself. Over the years, I moved to bigger digs with better kitchens but I still paced myself. Now, I have my beautiful dream kitchen and, yes, I still pace myself.

It all comes down to a realistic menu and comprehensive shopping and to-do lists. And by comprehensive, I mean absolutely everything. Yes, set aside a time to set the table. Yes, include the obvious on your shopping list. If you’re like me, you can forget to buy milk if it’s not on the list. So, unless you have a crush on the produce guy and want go back time and time again – write it down.

By the way, you’ll need two shopping lists, one for each trip. That’s right, two shopping trips. Make the first one in the next few days. That’s when you buy anything with a long or long-ish sell-by date like flour, hardy vegetables and wine. A day or two before Thanksgiving, do a quick fly-by for the turkey, perishables and whatever you forgot on the first go-round.

As for that to-do list, be sure to be realistic with timing and deadlines. Once you map everything out, the reality of the space-time continuum will be clear. Sorry, no matter how good you are at multi-tasking, you can’t singlehandedly run the local 5K Turkey Trot, set the table, bake three pies, peel the potatoes and make the stuffing between seven and ten on Thanksgiving morning.

Anything you can do ahead – do ahead – way, way, way ahead. If you can freeze it, cook it now. Not to brag but I whipped up my family’s favorite Butternut Squash Soup last weekend. Five quarts are ready to go in the freezer. Set the table on the Sunday. Make the cranberry sauce on Monday. If you are making a veggie casserole or two, get them done on Tuesday and Wednesday.

Don’t hesitate to ask for help. If your brother loves to smash potatoes, let him have at it. He can peel them too. If your neighbor is famous for her apple pie, invite her to bring one along. She’ll be flattered. Thanksgiving is all about sharing. Sharing a meal and sharing at least some of the joy of cooking it.

Revise your plan if the situation changes. Wait a minute, make that when the situation changes. Have you ever known a Thanksgiving to go without a hitch? The dog will steal the turkey. The supermarket will run out of butternut squash or cranberries or whatever. Your uncle’s car will break down and he’ll need a lift. Out of blue, a long-lost cousin will show up on your doorstep. Meanwhile, your niece’s kids will get the flu and they’ll cancel at the last minute. You’ll break your ankle. (I’ve got that one covered – did it a few weeks ago.) It will snow and the power will go out … or something like that.

Have a wonderful Thanksgiving and bon appétit!

Roasted Sweet Dumpling Squash & Onion
A quick and easy squash recipe to add to your Thanksgiving repertoire and beyond. Enjoy!
Serves 8

About 3 pounds Sweet Dumpling Squash, halved, seeded and cut into 1/2-inch wedges
2 medium red onions, halved and cut into 1/2-inch wedges
1 teaspoon finely chopped rosemary
1 teaspoon thyme
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon smoked paprika
Olive oil
Apple cider vinegar

Arrange the racks in the upper and lower third of the oven and preheat to 425 degrees.

Put the rosemary, thyme, salt, pepper and paprika in a small bowl and whisk to combine.

Put the squash in a large bowl, drizzle with enough equal parts olive oil and vinegar to lightly coat and toss. Sprinkle with half of the herb-spice mix and toss again.

Spread the squash in a single layer onto rimmed baking sheets. Roast the squash for about 15 minutes at 425 degrees.

While the squash roasts, put the onion in a large bowl, drizzle with enough equal parts olive oil and vinegar to lightly coat and toss. Sprinkle with the remaining the herb-spice mix and toss again.

Remove the baking sheets from the oven, give the squash a toss and arrange the onion around the squash. Switching pan positions from top to bottom and vice versa, return the vegetables to the oven. Reduce the heat to 375 degrees and roast for 15 minutes or until tender and browned.

Can be prepared in advance, cooled to room temperature, covered and refrigerated. Reheat at 350 degrees for about 10 minutes or until piping hot.

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One Year Ago – Cheesy Pumpkin-Sage Biscuits
Two Years Ago – Butternut Squash Tartlets
Three Years Ago – Lemony Kale & Radicchio Salad
Four Years Ago – Wild Rice & Mushroom Stuffing
Five Years Ago – Sweet Potato & Goat Cheese Crostini
Six Years Ago – Pumpkin Cheesecake
Seven Years Ago – Rustic Apple Croustade
Eight Years Ago – Cranberry Sauce
Nine Years Ago – Decadent Cheesy Potatoes
Ten Years Ago – Broccoli Puree

Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!

Are you a host or a guest this Thanksgiving? Either way, do you have a plan? Feel free to share!

Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook. © Susan W. Nye, 2018

What to Cook this Thanksgiving

With Thanksgiving twelve short days away, it’s time to think about planning your feast. If you’ll be a guest and not a host, you might like to check in with your host. Some expect you to bring a dish. Others like to do more or less everything. I’m a little like that. From the Rosemary Cashews to the Pumpkin Cheesecake, I tend to do it all.

However, that’s going to be a bit tough this year. I broke my ankle in late October and am still hobbling around on crutches. My sister-in-law has volunteered to take over hosting duties. Of course, I will be happy to tote along a dish or two.

Last year, I compiled The Long List. With more than sixty fall recipes, it includes all my Thanksgiving-friendly dishes. While impressive, a list of more than sixty recipes can be daunting. So, I’ve paired it down to a two or three, maybe four, options for each course. Here goes –

Appetizers
If you want to get fancy, by all means bake up a batch of my Butternut Squash Tartlets. (By the way – this would be a nice option to bring along if you are not the host.) Add a super easy appetizer to the mix with my Smoked Salmon Mousse. Cheese lovers will love my Warm Brie with Cranberry Chutney.

Soup or Salad?
I generally go with one or the other. However, for a super special meal, you can have both. (For a continental twist, serve the salad between the main course and dessert.) For salads, consider Roasted Beets with Goat Cheese Salad or Kale & Radicchio Salad with Roasted Butternut Squash. My two favorite soups for Thanksgiving are Roasted Butternut Squash Soup and Wild Mushroom Soup.

Turkey of course
You’ll never find a ham or leg of lamb on my Thanksgiving table. Instead, you can  rest assured that Roast Turkey with  Giblet Gravy will take center stage. In addition, either My Mom’s Stuffing or Wild Rice & Mushroom Stuffing will be in the bird.

The Sides
Then again, for some, the turkey is just an excuse to to bring on your favorite sides. I’m going to suggest you give my Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Pearl Onions and/or Roasted Carrots with Pearl Onions a-go this year. For spuds, you might like my Decadent Cheesy Potatoes and/or Savory Smashed Sweet Potatoes. (For marshmallow fans, you will never find a marshmallow studded sweet potato casserole at my house. However, this savory dish is really wonderful.)

A Sweet Finish
My all time, make it once a year favorite Thanksgiving dessert is Pumpkin Cheesecake. When two desserts are in order, I add my Rustic Apple Croustade.
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For the curious, here is my 2017 menu.

Speaking of continental, if your family ts a bit more adventurous than mine – you might want to give my menu for A New Englander’s Thanksgiving on the Swiss French Border a try. This menu is typical of the Thanksgiving feasts I prepared when I lived in Switzerland for almost two decades.

Then again, if you are fan of all things Italian, you might want to experiment with my take on A Rustic Harvest Feast Italian Style.

Have a wonderful Thanksgiving and bon appétit!

For a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog Click Here!!

What will you be cooking this Thanksgiving? I’d love to hear from you! Let’s get a conversation going.

Want more? Click here for more seasonal menus! © Susan W. Nye, 2018