Thankful for Leftovers Special

After the feast of feasts, the refrigerator is filled with Thanksgiving leftovers. If you didn’t do it yesterday, it’s time to make turkey stock. You’ll also want to organize the rest of the leftovers. If you have room in the freezer, you won’t have to cook for a week, maybe two.

Now, you’re asking … what the heck do I do with it all? Here are a few suggestions:

There is everyone’s favorite … soup:

My Favorite Spicy Chicken (or Turkey) Noodle Soup

Curried Thai Soup with Noodles, Turkey & Vegetables

Turkey Noodle Soup with Spinach

Not feeling soupy? How about:

Leftover Turkey Stir Fry

Black Friday Enchiladas (Turkey & Black Beans Enchiladas)

Cheesy Gratin with Thanksgiving Leftovers

Cheesy Chicken & Broccoli Pasta Bake

Poverty Casserole (Swap out the sausage with leftover turkey.)

Pumpkin Chili with Turkey & Black Beans (Replace the ground turkey with bite sized pieces of leftover turkey.)

If you love roasted vegetables, there’s a chance you made too many. Regardless of the mix – butternut squash, carrots, parsnips, beets or whatever … you can –

Whirl them into soup – use my Roasted Butternut Squash Soup recipe as a guide. Or pile them onto crostini and top with Goat Cheese & Balsamic Reduction. Try them in salad of Kale and Radicchio.

Any and all your roasted veggies will be delicious with Ravioli and Brown Butter, layered in Lasagna or stirred into Risotto.

Have a great weekend! Bon appétit!

For a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog Click Here!!

How are you spending the long holiday weekend? I’d love to hear from you! Let’s get a conversation going. To make a comment, just click on Comments below.

Want more? Click here for more seasonal menus! target=”_blank”>Eat Well-Do Good. © Susan W. Nye, 2017

Advertisements

The Truth about Thanksgiving & Kale & Radicchio Salad with Roasted Butternut Squash

Whether it is your first foray into cooking for the feasts of feasts, you are an old hand or a guest not host this year, there are certain inalienable truths about Thanksgiving. At least, they are true for me.

Truth Number One: You’re going to be a little nervous, maybe a lot nervous. I don’t want to increase your anxiety but Thanksgiving is kind of a big deal. Whether you’ve been doing it for years or not, cooking Thanksgiving dinner has a fair number of moving parts. There will be last minute cancellations, additions and changes. One year, I had to pack up all the food, pots and pans and move the entire feast to my brother’s house. Why? The dog was sick and couldn’t travel.

Don’t worry; you are not alone in your anxiety and it’s easy to conquer. First, you can dial back the menu. No one will notice if you skip the creamed onions. Another possibility, you can give a shout out for help. You never know; your cousin might be delighted to bring the creamed onions. Finally, you can judiciously buy other people’s cooking. Check your local bakery, the farmstand and your favorite caterer or restaurant to see what’s on offer. Even if the pies at the farmstand weren’t baked in your oven, they are homemade. The same goes for biscuits from the bakery and stuffed mushrooms for the gourmet deli.

Truth Number Two: You can leave that baggage at the door. You think yours is special? Forget about it. All families are complicated. However, when push comes to shove, and please no shoving or wrestling in the house, you can behave. Your brother can promise to stop talking politics for a few hours. For your part, you can hold him to it and refuse to take the bait when he wanders into dangerous territory. Your parents can agree to stay mute on your single status and you can put the complaints about your ex on hold. Remember, it’s only one dinner. Talk about the good times. I’m sure your family and friends have a few good memories.

Offer to bring a dish for your son’s vegetarian girlfriend. Yes, we know you don’t really like her but you love your son. Both quinoa and kale make a great peace offering. Alert your hosts of any new (real or imagined) food intolerance but don’t expect them to design the entire menu around you. Remember, there’s another faction within the family who thinks the menu should come straight off of Nana’s recipe cards. The ones she gave your mom in 1973.

Thanksgiving is a celebration. For goodness sake, just eat around your dietary issue or nostalgic yearnings. The Thanksgiving table is loaded with possibilities so don’t expect a whole lot of sympathy. Incidentally, there is no dairy in turkey and no gluten in mashed potatoes. And another thing, if Nana’s butternut squash is not on the table, enjoy the Brussels Sprouts.

Truth Number Three: Thanksgiving is always wonderful. It doesn’t matter how many little mishaps try to thwart you. Don’t worry. Like loaves and fishes, I once fed nineteen people from a eleven and a half pound turkey. Everyone had a last minute friend from out of town to bring along. I could have bought a larger turkey but it would not have fit in my apartment’s pint size oven.

Remember, everyone loves Thanksgiving. Outside it’s dreary and gray. Inside it’s warm and cheery. Family and friend love getting together. Whatever you cook, it will be delicious. Whatever anyone brings will be delicious. The conversation will flow. If things start to get a little unruly or teeter on the edge of civility, just say, “I’m thankful for _________” and fill in the blank. It works like magic.

Have a wonderful Thanksgiving with friends and family. Bon appétit!

Kale & Radicchio Salad with Roasted Butternut Squash
Serves 8

About 1 pound butternut squash, peeled, seeded and cut into bite-sized pieces
1/4 teaspoon dried thyme
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
Apple cider vinegar
Olive oil
About 8 ounces baby kale
1/2-1 small head radicchio, cored and cut in thin ribbons
Dijon Vinaigrette (recipe follows)
Pickled Red Onion (recipe follows)
About 2 ounces pecorino Romano cheese
About 1/4 cup toasted pumpkin seeds
About 1/4 cup dried cranberries

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.

Put the squash on a rimmed baking sheet(s). Sprinkle with thyme, salt and pepper, drizzle with enough vinegar and olive oil lightly coat, toss to combine and spread in a single layer. Roast at 375 degrees for 30 minutes or until lightly browned and tender. Let cool for a few minutes.

Can do ahead. Cover and store in the refrigerator. Serve the squash at room temperature or warm. To reheat – spread the squash on a baking sheet and bake at 350 degrees for about 5 minutes.

To serve: Toss the kale and radicchio with enough Dijon Vinaigrette to lightly coat. Put the greens on individual plates or a large platter and top with squash and pickled onion. Using a vegetable peeler or a course grater, make pecorino Romano cheese shavings. Sprinkle the salad with the cheese, pumpkin seeds and dried cranberries and serve.

Dijon Vinaigrette
Makes about 1 1/2 cups

1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
3 cloves garlic
3 tablespoons chopped shallot or red onion
2 tablespoons whole grain Dijon mustard
2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
1/4 teaspoon or to taste hot pepper sauce
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
About 1 cup or to taste extra virgin olive oil

Put the vinegar, garlic and shallots in a blender, season with salt and pepper and process until the garlic and shallot is finely chopped. Add the mustards, Worcestershire sauce and hot sauce and process until smooth. With the motor running, slowly add the olive oil and process until thick and creamy. Transfer the vinaigrette to a storage container with a tight fitting lid.

Let the vinaigrette sit for 30 minutes or more to let the flavors combine. Give the vinaigrette a vigorous shake before using. Cover and store extra vinaigrette in the refrigerator.

Quick Pickled Red Onion
1 tablespoon sugar
1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
1/2 cup apple cider vinegar
1 red onion, thinly sliced
2-3 cloves garlic, smashed and peeled
6 pepper corns
1 bay leaf

Put the sugar, salt and vinegar in Mason jar, let everything sit for a minute or two to dissolve and give it a good shake. Add 1 cup of water and shake again.

Add the onion, garlic, peppercorns and bay leaf. If necessary, add a little more vinegar and water to cover the onion. Refrigerate for at least 2 hours and up to two weeks. Drain before using. Cover and store leftover onion in the refrigerator.

Print-friendly version of this post.

One Year Ago – Homemade Butternut Squash Ravioli with Browned Butter
Two Years Ago – Thanksgiving Leftovers
Three Years Ago – Cranberry Clafoutis
Four Years Ago – Black Friday Enchiladas (Enchiladas with Turkey & Black Beans)
Five Years Ago – Snowy Pecan Balls
Six Years Ago – Chocolate Truffles
Seven Years Ago – Smoked Salmon Mousse
Eight Years Ago – Roasted Beans
Ninen Years Ago – Winter Soup with Pasta, Beans & Greens

Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!

What are you serving this Thanksgiving? Feel free to share!

Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook. © Susan W. Nye, 2017

What’s Cooking this Thanksgiving? More Holiday Menus

Still not sure what to cook for Thanksgiving? We’re getting close to the final countdown and there isn’t a lot of time left to decide. I’ve got three menus that you might find helpful:

Thanksgiving Dinner at my House

New England Meets France

A Rustic Harvest Feast Italian Style

If you need a dish to bring to a potluck … I’ve put together a list of Thankgiving-ish dishes. Give one or two a try.

What’s Cooking? Thanksgiving at my House

I am very excited to be cooking Thanksgiving dinner in my new kitchen. So you ask, “What are you cooking for Thanksgiving?” Obviously, you’ve noticed, I’ve got a lot of recipes that would be pretty darn delicious for Turkey Day. How do I whittle them down for the Nye Family Thanksgiving?

It’s a juggling act. When it comes to Thanksgiving, my family can be pretty traditional. I developed a somewhat eclectic (electric for my family) while I was in Switzerland. When I moved back to New Hampshire, I had to dial it back. Slowly but surely, I’ve add a new dish or two.

So – here’s what I’ll be cooking next Thursday!

Nibbles, spreads, dips, savory biscuits and appetizers
Dad will prepare his Shrimp and Cocktail Sauce. I think I’ll cook up a small wheel of Warm Brie with Cranberry Chutney or put together a display of my favorite cheeses and add a basket of my Cheesy Pumpkin-Sage Biscuits. And finally, I’ll roast up a batch of Rosemary Cashews.

Soups
I’ve already whipped up a batch of Roasted Butternut Squash Soup. I generally serve it in mugs towards the end of the cocktail hour.

Turkey& Sides
I will be roasting a Turkey, stuffing it with Wild Rice & Mushroom Stuffing and serving it with Giblet Gravy and Cranberry Sauce.

For veggies and sides, I’ll be making Broccoli Purée, smashing up some Decadent Cheesy Potatoes and Savory Smashed Sweet Potatoes. As an updated homage to my mom, I may make my Roasted Mushrooms, Leeks, Shallots & Pearl Onions. (Mom always made creamed onions for Thanksgiving.)

Sweet Treats
My sister-in-law is bringing dessert so I’m off the hook. If I was going to bake, I would make my Pumpkin Cheesecake. If that wasn’t enough, I’d add my Rustic Apple Croustade.

And there you have it! My slowly evolving and changing Thanksgiving menu, version 2017.

Happy Thanksgiving from all the Nyes!

For a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog Click Here!!

What’s up with you this weekend? I’d love to hear from you! Let’s get a conversation going. To make a comment, just click on Comments below.

Want more? Click here for more seasonal menus! © Susan W. Nye, 2017

Getting Ready to Give Thanks & Cheesy Pumpkin-Sage Biscuits

I thought we had another week at least! Ten days out, it’s past time to think about Thanksgiving. Professional chef or home cook, your most important tool is between your ears. If you are hosting the harvest feast, before you do anything, think it through and make your plan. No, I don’t mean one of those la-di-da, it’s-all-in-my-head, loosey-goosey plans. Get out your pencil and write it down.

Maybe you are skeptical; you’ve been doing this for years! Maybe you are nervous; it’s your first big sit down dinner. In either case, you can’t help but ask, “Okay, what’s in this plan?” Well, truth be told, it’s nothing more and nothing less than a series of lists.

It starts with the menu. That’s right, what do you want to serve at the great feast? Will you stay with tradition and pull Nana’s menu out of your memory bank? By the way, if you let tradition rule, are you absolutely certain that you want to make that green Jell-O mold again? You know the one – with crushed pineapple, grated carrots and mini-marshmallows. Just askin’.

Then again, maybe you skimmed the latest issue of one of those foodie magazines in the checkout line at the supermarket. If so, tried and true might be looking a little done and donner. If so, it could be time to change things up – a little or a lot. Hesitating? Don’t, it will be fun.

But where to start? That’s easy, the internet of course. Type in a few key words and to search for those intriguing recipes you perused in the checkout line. If you’re more of a cookbook person, spend an hour at the kitchen table leafing through your collection. You’re bound to find something similar. Regardless of your menu, make sure it includes a good number of make-ahead dishes. You have enough to do on Thanksgiving morning without whipping up another casserole.

When it comes to Thanksgiving, don’t be shy about accepting or asking for help if you need it. At least one or two guests will probably offer to bring something. When friends or family suggest something delicious, say yes, and answer quickly before they change their minds. I was delighted when my sister-in-law volunteered to bring the pies. However, kind as friends and rellies are, not all offers are equal. (Sorry, but there will be no green bean casserole on my Thanksgiving table.) Be kind and politely suggest an alternative to the rutabaga mash or Jell-O mold or assure them you’ve got everything covered.

Back to the grand plan, add whatever potluck offerings to your menu and adjust accordingly. If your cousin is bringing the aforementioned green bean casserole (hey, it’s your party not mine) then you can skip the broccoli gratin. Unless you are hosting a cast of thousands, you don’t need two kinds of yams, roasted and mashed potatoes and five or six different green and/or yellow vegetables.

With your menu done, use it to create your shopping list. Go through each recipe and your pantry and then write down any and everything you need to create your wonderful feast. Don’t forget to add the wine, cider, flowers and whatever else you might need.

Finally, create your to-do list and make a time line. Remember those make-ahead dishes? Figure out when you will make them plus set the table and run the vacuum cleaner around the living room. Be realistic about time. Whether it’s peeling the potatoes or finding the turkey platter, don’t let optimism get in the way of reality. It will take longer than think. By all means, enlist help. Remember those that can’t cook can run errands and the vacuum cleaner.

Wishing you good luck and fun with your Turkey Day preparations and bon appétit!

Cheesy Pumpkin- Sage Biscuits
Pass these versatile biscuits before dinner for a tasty appetizer or serve them with the main course. Bake up another batch over the weekend for extra special turkey sandwiches. Enjoy!

Makes about 2 dozen dinner biscuits or 8 dozen minis*

4 cups all-purpose flour
2 1/2 tablespoons baking powder
2 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon cumin
1/2 teaspoon or to taste chipotle chili powder
1 cup (2 sticks) butter, cut in small pieces
1 1/2 cups (about 6 ounces) grated sharp cheddar cheese
3 tablespoons chopped fresh sage
1 1/2 cups pumpkin purée
1/2 cup sour cream
1 tablespoon maple syrup
Cream or melted butter

Position the racks in the top and bottom third of the oven and preheat to 425 degrees. Line baking sheets with parchment paper or a silicon mat.

Put the flour, baking powder, salt and spices in the bowl of a food processor and pulse to combine.

Add the butter and pulse until the dough resembles coarse meal. Add the cheddar and sage and pulse to combine. Transfer the dough to a bowl.

Put the pumpkin, sour cream and maple syrup in a bowl and whisk to combine. Add the wet ingredients to the dough and stir to combine. If necessary, add an extra tablespoon or two of sour cream.

Divide and pat the dough into 2 balls, place on a lightly floured work surface and shape each piece into rectangle about 9×12-inches and about 3/4-inch thick. Cut the biscuits into 3-inch* squares and place them on the prepared baking sheets.

Brush the top of each biscuit with cream or melted butter and bake at 425 until golden, about 15 minutes. Remove the biscuits from the oven, cool for 5-10 minutes and serve warm.

* For tasty appetizers, cut the biscuits into 1 1/2-inch squares and reduce the baking time.

Print-friendly version of this post.

One Year Ago – Butternut Squash Tartlets
Two Years Ago – Lemony Kale & Radicchio Salad
Three Years Ago – Wild Rice & Mushroom Stuffing
Four Years Ago – Sweet Potato & Goat Cheese Crostini
Five Years Ago – Pumpkin Cheesecake
Six Years Ago – Rustic Apple Croustade
Seven Years Ago – Cranberry Sauce
Eight Years Ago – Decadent Cheesy Potatoes
Nine Years Ago – Broccoli Puree
Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!

Are you ready for the next power outage? What are secret survival tricks? Feel free to share!

Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook. © Susan W. Nye, 2017

What to Cook for Thanksgiving – The Long List

You might have noticed, I’ve been working on this blog for about ten years now. From tasty appetizers to delicious soups and salads, the glorious main course, the fabulous sides and decadent desserts – that’s a lot of recipes … including many, many Thanksgiving dishes…

To make it easier for you, I’ve listed some of my favorite autumnal dishes to make your feasts of feast truly special. Pick and choose whatever interests you … or wait a few days. Throughout the month, I’ll be posting menus and more tips.

Here you go!

Happy Thanksgiving!

Drinks
Dark & Stormy
Kir Royale
Hot Mulled Cider

Nibbles, spreads, dips, savory biscuits and appetizers
Roasted Almonds
Rosemary Cashews

Warm Brie with Cranberry Chutney
Warm Gorgonzola with Caramelized Onions & Walnuts
Roasted Beet & White Bean Hummus

Chipotle Sweet Potato & White Bean Hummus
Savory Rosemary Biscotti
Gorgonzola & Walnut Shortbread with Savory Fig Jam
Crostini with Butternut Squash, Goat Cheese & Balsamic Reduction

Sweet Potato & Goat Cheese Crostini
Mediterranean Shrimp
Roasted Shrimp with Tarragon Aioli
Butternut Squash Tartlets
Spanish Stuffed Mushrooms

Soups
Roasted Butternut Squash Soup
Roasted Carrot Soup
Wild Mushroom Soup
Sweet Potato & Red Lentil Soup (keep this one in mind if you have a vegetarian in the group)

Salads
Crunchy Salad with Apples & Grapes
Roasted Beets with Goat Cheese Salad
Butternut Squash Salad
Roasted Cauliflower, Radicchio & Arugula Salad
Mixed Greens with Roasted Mushrooms
Lemony Kale & Radicchio Salad
Romaine & Radicchio Caesar Salad

The Turkey
Roast Turkey with My Mom’s Stuffing & Giblet Gravy
Wild Rice & Mushroom Stuffing
Savory Bread Pudding with Butternut Squash & Swiss Chard

Veggies & Sides
Roasted Brussels Sprouts & Pearl Onions
Roasted Beets with Sautéed Greens
Mashed Butternut Squash
Broccoli Purée
Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Pearl Onions
Roasted Carrots with Pearl Onions
Roasted Parsnips
Roasted Mushrooms, Leeks, Shallots & Pearl Onions
Decadent Cheesy Potatoes
Smashed or Mashed Potatoes
Lemon Roasted Potatoes
Savory Smashed Sweet Potatoes
Wild Rice Pilaf with Roasted Mushrooms & Kale

Sweet Treats
Apple Crumb Cake
Applesauce Cake with Brown Butter Icing
Pumpkin Cheesecake
Pumpkin Cupcakes
Apple Bread Pudding
Old-Fashioned Apple Crisp with Cranberry Coulis
Rustic Apple Croustade
Rustic Apple Tart
Mini Tarte Tatin (Mini Upside Down Apple Pies)
Chocolate Walnut Tart
Aunt Anna’s Pecan Pie
 Cranberry Clafoutis
Maple Mousse with Apple Compote
Pumpkin-Ginger Mousse
White Chocolate & Cranberry Trifle
Apple Oatmeal Cookies
Ginger Shortbread
Pumpkin & Spice Cookies
Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Squares
Mini Pumpkin Whoopie Pies

For a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog Click Here!!

What’s up with you this weekend? I’d love to hear from you! Let’s get a conversation going. To make a comment, just click on Comments below.

Want more? Click here for more seasonal menus! © Susan W. Nye, 2017

Thankful for Leftovers Special

ThanksAhh the day after Thanksgiving. Nothing to do but put your feet up, make the turkey stock and … either go for a walk or let out all your pants. (If you haven’t figured it out yet, I’m not a Black Friday shopper!) There is so much food in the refrigerator; you won’t need to make dinner for a week, maybe two.

The only question is what to do with all that leftover food … 

… well, here are a few thoughts …

There is everyone’s favorite … soup:

My Favorite Spicy Chicken (or Turkey) Noodle Soup

Curried Thai Soup with Noodles, Turkey & Vegetables

Turkey Noodle Soup with Spinach

Not feeling soupy? How about:

Leftover Turkey Stir Fry

Black Friday Enchiladas (Turkey & Black Beans Enchiladas)

Cheesy Gratin with Thanksgiving Leftovers

Pumpkin Chili with Turkey & Black Beans (Replace the ground turkey with bite sized pieces of leftover turkey.)

If you love roasted vegetables, there’s a chance you made too many. Whether you’ve got roasted butternut squash, carrots, parsnips or a mix, they’re delicious in many, many ways. Enjoy your gently reheated, roasted vegetables in a variety of interesting concoctions:

As an appetizer, try them on Crostini with Goat Cheese & Balsamic Reduction

On a salad of Mixed Greens with Dried Cranberries, Pumpkin Seeds and Parmigiano-Reggiano or Arugula with Goat Cheese Salad and Toasted Walnuts.

Go Italian, pull out the pasta machine and have some fun with Homemade Butternut Squash Ravioli with Browned Butter. Alternatively, you can buy your raviolis and enjoy Ravioli with Roasted Butternut Squash & Browned Butter. Need a few more options, what about  Butternut Squash Lasagna or Squash Risotto?

If all fails, whirl them into soup. Regardless of the veggies, you can probably use my Roasted Butternut Squash Soup as a guide.

slippers_02Need more … alright, here are a few more suggestions.

Have a great weekend! Bon appétit!

For a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog Click Here!!

How are you spending the long holiday weekend? I’d love to hear from you! Let’s get a conversation going. To make a comment, just click on Comments below.

Want more? Click here for more seasonal menus! © Susan W. Nye, 2016