Unleashed & Bagels with Lox & Cream Cheese

A neighbor recently reminded me of the good old days when kids and dogs roamed the woods and byways. No leash laws, just happy go lucky dogs with their free-range kids, sniffing and exploring to their hearts content.

When we lived on Jackson Road, we had two dogs, Penny, a feisty mutt and Eeyore, a born old Labrador retriever. Every morning they met up with their friends Alvin, a cute little terrier mix and Manfred, a furry midsized dog of mixed parentage. If Penny and Eeyore were slow to get up and out, Alvin yipped at the backdoor to speed them along.

While harmless, I suppose you could call them a pack. The foursome spent a good part of the day roaming the neighborhood looking for adventure. In most cases, that meant wandering around the woods, doing tricks to be rewarded with cookies from nice old ladies, rolling in smelly stuff and swimming in the pond at the end the road. In winter, they joined hockey games on the same pond. Now, Penny was not only feisty; she loved to steal pucks. She was never entirely sure of what to do with them but enjoyed the hubbub of a dozen kids chasing her across the ice.

When school let out for the day or summer, this canine quartet kept half an eye on their humans. The dogs wandered in and out of games of kick the can, napped under trees while we climbed and chased bicycles and sleds along with the afore mentioned hockey pucks.

The only time our dogs saw the end of a leash was … well, never. When we took them with us to a friend’s house or the school playground, they stayed by our side. Oh sure, they’d meander off to sniff an interesting smell but they’d circle back within a minute or two. If not, we’d give a call and a whistle and they’d bound back wondering what all the fuss was about.

As the snow melts, the number of walkers and runners that pass my house near Pleasant Lake is growing. The first of the snowbirds are back. The fair weather walkers and runners are taking tentative steps out the door. The cross-country team from nearby Colby-Sawyer College dashes by. The day-in-day-out, twelve months of the year regulars, myself among them, will soon be outnumbered. Of course, the year-round diehards include a handful of dog walkers.

Big dogs, little dogs, young dogs, old dogs, glued-to-their-human’s-side dogs and boy-I’d-love-to-break-this-leash dogs, they all love a walk around the lake. For all their smiles, I suppose they would be terribly jealous, if they knew their great-grandparents wandered free.

With warmer weather and longer days, the pedestrian traffic around the lake will continue to grow. The summer people and their dogs will be here before you know it. It’s sad that the dogs can’t join a pack of friends like their young humans do. Throughout the summer, herds of kids play together on the lake, in the lake and around the lake. Meanwhile, their poor dogs sit at home.

Eeyore loved New Hampshire, the woods and lake. (Unfortunately, Penny went to live on a farm before we built the little brown house in the woods.) Just like his humans, Eeyore had a whole passel of summer friends. They spent hours wandering, investigating and swimming. Of course, some wandering and sniffing led to trouble. Among other discoveries, they found porcupines and skunks.

With or without man’s best friend, get outside and enjoy the sunshine. Bon appétit!

Bagels with Lox & Cream Cheese
I’m not big on breakfast except during mud season. That’s when I’m happy to indulge in a leisurely weekend brunch. Whether with friends or binge watching the news, be sure to include bagels and lox in your mud season brunch. Enjoy!
Makes about 1 cup salmon spread – enough for 6-8 bagels

4 ounces cream cheese, at room temperature
Freshly ground pepper or your favorite hot pepper sauce to taste
4 ounces smoked salmon, at room temperature
Bagels
Chives, chopped

Make the spread: put the cream cheese in a bowl, add ground pepper or pepper sauce to taste and whisk with a fork until well combined.

Finely chop the smoked salmon and add it to the cream cheese. Whisk again until well combined.

Slice the bagels lengthwise and open up into 2 rounds. Toast the bagels in the toaster or under the broiler if you have a big crowd.

Top each bagel half with a good sized schmear of Lox & Cream Cheese Spread, sprinkle with chopped chives and serve.

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One Year Ago – Cheesy Eggplant Parmigiana with Spaghetti Marinara
Two Years Ago – Ravioli with Saffron Cream, Grilled Asparagus & Mushrooms
Three Years Ago – Lamb Shanks with Mushrooms & Pearl Onions
Four Years Ago – New Hampshire Mud Pie
Five Years Ago – White Beans Provençal with Bacon & Baby Kale
Six Years Ago – Moroccan Spiced Grilled Lamb with Roasted Eggplant Salsa
Seven Years Ago – Linguine with Shrimp, Artichokes Sun-Dried Tomatoes and Olives
Eight Years Ago – Roast Chicken 
Nine Years Ago – Roasted Asparagus with Walnuts
Ten Years Ago – Roasted Eggplant with Peperonata

Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!

Do you have a favorite dog? Feel free to share!

Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook. © Susan W. Nye, 2019

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Come Together & Quinoa-Cheddar Cakes

What’s going on? We are plagued by division. Forget dog eat dog; we live in a world of dog people versus cat people. The simplest of nonissues spark controversy with #whiteandgold versus #blueandblack, Facebook versus Twitter and Superman versus Batman. Not to mention, the more significant debates of stay-at-home versus working moms, Coke versus Pepsi, skins versus shirts, this versus that and on and on. It’s exhausting.

Not only exhausting but (and I’m speculating here) it’s hardly worth it. White-gold-blue-black, it’s only a dress. As for the Facebook and Twitter question, well, think for a minute. Whether its 400 or 4,000 or 4,000,000, the vast majority of your contacts are not friends and they are definitely not your followers. Unless of course, you are some kind of cult leader. If that’s the case, I guess you do have followers. Whoa, that’s a bit scary.

Anyway, life is complicated. Issues can rarely be dumbed down to either or. Unless someone’s asking about dinner at a wedding reception, then it works. By the way, take the chicken. The beef is always well done as in overcooked and tough as shoe leather. Okay, lets get back to more complicated choices and debates.

The Man of Steel can fly which is incredibly special and pretty wonderful, especially if you live somewhere with a lot of traffic. On the other hand, Batman has lots of cool toys and is a millionaire. However, he is a brooding type of guy and never seems too happy. You could ask, why have a bunch of cool toys if they don’t make you happy? Wouldn’t it be better to fly around and leap tall buildings? Not to digress but have you ever noticed that invisibility is an exceedingly rare super power? More than complicated, that one is just creepy.

Anyway, I guess if pushed to choose, I’d lean towards Superman. However, in the grand scheme of things – the debate is not worth a big or even a small blowup. Surely, you wouldn’t risk a longtime friend or the close relationship with your sister, brother, uncle or whoever over Clark Kent and Bruce Wayne.

Cuddle your cat or sing with your parakeet. Enjoy that Pepsi, Mountain Dew or Dr. Pepper. Play rugby with or without a shirt. Post your photos on Instagram and Tweet to your heart’s content. It’s okay by me. Except for mean Tweets, even if I don’t see them, it would make me sad to think you might be so inclined.

When it gets right down to it; we’re more alike than different. Most of us want the same things out of life. We want to be warm, safe and loved. We’d like to have enough food to keep us going and good health. We’d like to be happy. While we all have different definitions of luxury, I’m betting we’d all like to indulge in an extravagance now and then.

Not convinced? Here’s one undeniable truth that ties us together – we all put our socks on before our shoes. Spike heels, mukluks or sneakers; silky stocking or wooly socks, the order is undeniable. It links us through time and space. Unless you don’t wear socks or shoes or both. If that’s the case, you probably still put your pants on one leg at a time.

A toast to a lot less partisanship and a lot more kindness and understanding. Bon appétit!

Quinoa-Cheddar Cakes
Appetizer, side dish or main, these little cakes are delicious and have a nice crunch. Serve them with a dab of guacamole and salsa or sprinkle with cilantro and finely chopped red bell pepper. Enjoy!
Makes about 16 regular cakes

1 cup quinoa
Sea salt and freshly ground pepper
4-5 scallions, finely chopped
3-4 cloves garlic, minced
1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves
1 teaspoon finely chopped fresh oregano
1 teaspoon cumin
1/4 teaspoon smoked paprika
5 large eggs
1-2 teaspoons hot pepper sauce
1 cup (about 4 ounces) grated cheddar cheese
Olive oil
Garnish: your favorite salsa and/or guacamole or cilantro and finely chopped red bell pepper

Cook the quinoa until tender according to package directions.

While the quinoa cooks, put the scallions, garlic, herbs and spices in a large bowl, season with salt and pepper and toss to combine. Add the hot quinoa to the scallions and stir to combine. Cool to room temperature.

Preheat the oven to 170 degrees.

Put the eggs and pepper sauce in a bowl and whisk until smooth. Add the eggs to the quinoa and stir to combine. Add the cheese and toss to combine. Let the mixture sit for about 15 minutes or cover and refrigerate until ready to cook.

Lightly coat a large, heavy skillet with olive oil and heat over medium. Working in batches, add dollops of quinoa to the pan and flatten into pancakes. (A 1/4-1/3 cup ice cream scoop works well. A mini scoop is good for hors d’oeuvres.)

Fry the pancakes for 5-8 minutes per side or until lightly browned and cooked through.

Remove the cakes from the pan and drain on paper towels. Transfer the cakes to an ovenproof platter to keep warm in the oven and continue with the next batch.

Serve immediately with your favorite salsa, guacamole or a sprinkle of cilantro and finely chopped red bell pepper.

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One Year Ago – Roasted Carrot Salad
Two Years Ago – Irish Lamb Stew
Three Years Ago – Roasted Parsnips with Rosemary
Four Years Ago – Not-Really-Irish and Not-Really-French Potato Gratin
Five Years Ago – Zucchini Pancakes
Six Years Ago – Traditional Irish Soda Bread
Seven Three Years Ago – Moroccan Chicken with Preserved Lemons
Eight Years Ago – Grilled Strip Steak with Gorgonzola Sauce
Nine Years Ago – Linguine with Sundried Tomato Pesto & Roasted Eggplant
Ten Years Ago – Fettuccine with Classic Bolognese Sauce

Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!

What are your thoughts? Can you suggest one action – large or small – to help bring us together? Feel free to share!

Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook. © Susan W. Nye, 2019

 

The First Day of Spring? & Maple Muffins

Tomorrow is the first day of spring. While the concept is not completely foreign, it will be awhile before we see spring in New Hampshire. Or at least the spring depicted in magazines. You know the one I mean. The spring that has flowers gently bobbing in a warm breeze.

Meanwhile, you can measure the snow in my yard in feet not inches. Instead of spring, the vernal equinox kicks off mud season in New Hampshire. In spite of the calendar, mud season more or less began about a week ago. After what may or may not have been the final snowstorm of the season, temperatures began to climb. Giant snowbanks are starting to shrink. Throughout the winter, slabs of sand-embedded ice have managed to cover every shady stretch of road. Those slabs are now crumbling.

Sit quietly for a moment and you can hear the first sounds of a New Hampshire spring. No, not a flock of red red robins bobbin’ bob bobbin’ along, they’re still waiting for the snow to disappear. The sounds you hear are the constant drip, trickle and even rush of melting snow and ice. Every dip in the road and driveway is now home to a murky pool. Run off flows freely into seasonal creeks. Small, usually slow-moving brooks are gushing with icy water.

Of course, sand and mud are everywhere. Otherwise, we couldn’t or wouldn’t call it mud season. Hardy country people, we rarely bother with fancy shoes. Throughout the winter, we make sure we have a good tread to keep from slipping and sliding on the ice and snow. With the snowmelt, those same shoes and boots keep our feet dry. Only problem, that tread picks up everything in its path and then tracks it all into the house. When it’s cold, that’s a little snow. It melts and we mop it up with an old towel. Now, a trail of sand and mud follows us inside.

Let’s face it, in spite of the mud, we love the change of seasons. It doesn’t matter if it’s messy, we still smile when the weather starts to warm. And yes, warm is a relative term. Every day the temperature is above freezing and the sun is out is a good day. Speaking of sun, we applaud every extra minute of daylight. Pun or not, there’s an extra spring in our step as well as some additional cheer to our greetings.

There’s plenty to make you cheerful. If you haven’t been out, the skiing is fantastic. (Or so I hear, my ankle took the winter off.) There’s smoke coming out of the sap house chimney. Who needs flowers when the sweet smell of maple syrup fills the air? Bets are being placed on the day and time for ice out on the lake. Forget the lottery – you could win a bundle on the Ice Out Challenge!

In addition, while I don’t want to jinx it, when it comes to chores, mud season is one of those in between times. The garden and lawn are covered with snow so no weeding or mowing. As for shoveling, there’s a fifty-fifty chance or better that any precipitation will fall as rain instead of snow. And besides, once mid-March comes around, I’ve been known to leave the snow where if falls. After all, why shovel when warmer temperatures and the sun will (eventually) take care of it?

Here’s to the longer, warmer days and bon appétit!

Maple Muffins
Mud season is also maple season in New Hampshire. A batch of maple muffins will make a wonderful addition to an afternoon cup of tea or Sunday brunch. Enjoy!
Makes about 2 dozen muffins

2 cups flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon nutmeg
1 teaspoon salt
1 cup chopped walnuts
1 cup currents
1/2 cup (1 stick) butter, room temperature
3/4 cup pure maple syrup
2 eggs
1 cup sour cream
1 tablespoon dark rum

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Line muffin tins with paper liners.

Put the flour, baking powder, baking soda and spices in a bowl and whisk to combine. Add the walnuts and whisk again. Set aside.

Put the butter in a bowl and beat with an electric mixer until smooth. With the mixer running, slowly add the maple syrup. Add the eggs one at a time and beat until smooth. Add the sour cream and rum and beat until smooth.

With the mixer on low, gradually add the dry ingredients and beat until just combined.

Use an ice cream scoop or two spoons to fill each muffin cup about 2/3 with batter. Bake in the middle of the oven for about 15 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in the center of a muffin comes out clean. Cool in the pan for 5-10 minutes, transfer to a wire rack. Serve warm or at room temperature.

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One Year Ago – Roasted Carrot Salad
Two Years Ago – Irish Lamb Stew
Three Years Ago – Roasted Parsnips with Rosemary
Four Years Ago – Not-Really-Irish and Not-Really-French Potato Gratin
Five Years Ago – Zucchini Pancakes
Six Years Ago – Traditional Irish Soda Bread
Seven Three Years Ago – Moroccan Chicken with Preserved Lemons
Eight Years Ago – Grilled Strip Steak with Gorgonzola Sauce
Nine Years Ago – Linguine with Sundried Tomato Pesto & Roasted Eggplant
Ten Years Ago – Fettuccine with Classic Bolognese Sauce

Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!

Are you for or against or … the time change? Feel free to share!

Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook. © Susan W. Nye, 2019

Women & Their Stories & Chocolate-Raspberry Cupcakes

With frigid temperatures one day and icy rain and snow the next, March is a month about fortitude. It’s about marching forward against all odds. How do I know this? I don’t. I made it up but it sounds good. It sounds good because March is Women’s History Month and history is filled with women who moved forward against all odds.

Famous and infamous women fill the history books or should. Women we admire like Jane Austin, Elizabeth Blackwell and Shirley Chisholm. There is also the list we keep close to our hearts. Long or short, it includes all the women who have personally influenced our lives. That one includes our grandmothers, mothers, sisters and aunts, a neighbor, maybe two and a couple of friends plus a few teachers and mentors. Most of these women will never have a Wikipedia page but they helped make us who we are.

If you haven’t been paying attention, don’t worry. It’s a thirty-one day month. You have plenty of time to celebrate the women who have inspired, encouraged and influenced you. Now, the only question is – how to celebrate? Here are a few ideas:

Send a note to a woman who made a positive impact on your life. Perhaps she helped you over a rough patch or led by shining example. Maybe she encouraged you when you were at an impasse or read you the riot act when you were floundering. If you’ve lost touch, she may be wondering how you turned out. Share your story with her, thank her and let her know how much she means to you.

Do a little research and look deeper into the lives of some of the women you admire. We all know the two minute version of our favorite heroines. How about a deep dive? Environmentalist might want to learn more about Rachel Carson. If you’re a numbers person explore the life of Katherine Johnson. Musicians can read up on Aretha Franklin and art lovers research Mary Cassatt.

Share stories about your mother, grandmothers and aunties with your kids and grandkids. Help them understand their roots and family history. You might even try writing some of those stories down. Not as a series of dates and data points; focus on the wonderful, strong, vulnerable, living, breathing human beings who helped make you – you.

Tell your own stories. How exactly did you end up being so terrific and right here, right now? Think your story isn’t all that interesting? Think again. Of course, it’s old hat to you. After all, you were there; you lived it. Take some time to stop and reflect. There must be a thousand little things that make you special.

Gather friends around the table for a meal and storytelling. Throughout history, women have gathered around tables to make quilts. Our stories are like the patches in a quilt. Each piece represents a memory and together they form a brilliant whole. Our personal experiences are set against a background of both ordinary and historic events. Embrace and share the crazy hodgepodge of memories. That wonderful, disorganized mix is a beautiful summary of life.

As Abigail Adams once said, “Remember the ladies” and bon appétit!

Chocolate-Raspberry Cupcakes
These cupcakes are in honor of my mother. She loved chocolate and she loved raspberries. Enjoy!
Makes about 24 cupcakes

1/2 cup seedless raspberry jam
1/2 cup water
1/2 cup (1 stick) butter, at room temperature and cut in pieces
3 ounces unsweetened chocolate, chopped
2 cups sugar
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1 tablespoon Framboise or raspberry liqueur
2 eggs, separated
1/2 cup sour cream
2 cups less 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
Chocolate-Raspberry Glaze (recipe follows)
White Chocolate-Cream Cheese Frosting (recipe follows)
Fresh raspberries for garnish

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Line muffin tins with paper liners.

Put the jam and water in a heavy saucepan and bring to a boil over high heat. Remove from the heat and add the butter and chocolate. Let the butter and chocolate sit and melt for a few minutes and then whisk to combine.

Add the sugar, Framboise and vanilla to the chocolate and whisk until smooth.

Put the egg yolks in a bowl and whisk until smooth. Whisking constantly, slowly add the chocolate to the eggs. Add the sour cream and whisk until smooth.

Put the flour, baking soda, baking powder and salt in a bowl and whisk to combine. Add the dry ingredients to the chocolate mixture and combine thoroughly.

Beat the egg whites until stiff but not dry. Stir a quarter of the egg whites into the batter and combine thoroughly. Gently fold the remaining egg whites into the batter.

Use an ice cream scoop or two spoons to fill each muffin cup about 2/3 with batter. Bake in the middle of the oven for about 20 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in the center of a cupcake comes out clean. Cool in the pan for 5-10 minutes, transfer to a wire rack and cool completely.

To assemble: spread warm Chocolate-Raspberry Glaze on the cupcakes. Place the cupcakes in the refrigerator or freezer to cool until the chocolate has set. Use a pastry bag fitted with a large tip to add a hefty dollop of White Chocolate-Cream Cheese Frosting. Top each cupcake with a raspberry.

If making ahead, store in the refrigerator. Bring to room temperature before serving.

Chocolate-Raspberry Glaze
1/2 cup heavy cream
1/2 cup seedless raspberry jam
Pinch salt
4 ounces bittersweet chocolate or a mix of bittersweet and milk chocolate, chopped
1 tablespoon butter, cut in pieces

Combine the cream, jam and salt in a heavy saucepan and heat to steaming over medium. Remove from the heat and add the chocolate and butter. Let the chocolate sit for a few minutes and then whisk until the chocolate is smooth and completely melted.

Let the ganache cool for about 10 minutes before frosting the cupcakes.

White Chocolate-Cream Cheese Frosting
1/2 cup (1 stick) butter, at room temperature
8 ounces cream cheese, at room temperature
2 tablespoons sour cream
About 4 cups confectioners’ sugar, sifted
1 tablespoon Framboise
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
8 ounces white chocolate, melted and cooled slightly

Put the butter, cream cheese and sour cream in a bowl and beat with an electric mixer on medium speed until well combined.

Reduce the speed to low, slowly add the confectioners’ sugar and beat until just combined. Add the Framboise, vanilla and white chocolate, increase mixer speed to medium-high and continue beating until smooth.

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One Year Ago – Pork Stew with Beans & Greens
Two Years Ago – Shrimp Curry with Spinach
Three Years Ago – Mini Tarte Tatin
Four Years Ago – Lemon Roasted Chicken
Five Years Ago – Panna Cotta with Strawberries
Six Years Ago – Decadent Mac & Cheese
Seven Years Ago – Seared Scallops with Roasted Pepper Sauce
Eight Years Ago –
Creole Shrimp with Creamy Grits
Nine Years Ago –
Wild Mushroom Risotto
Ten Years Ago –
Swimming Pool Jello

Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!

Are you for or against or … the time change? Feel free to share!

Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook. © Susan W. Nye, 2019

Clocks Forward & Spaghetti with Roasted Brussels Sprouts & Bacon

Don’t forget to nudge your clocks forward an hour this coming Saturday. And by the way, I don’t like it one bit. Daylight is a scarce commodity in my neighborhood during the winter months. December is awful and it doesn’t get a whole lot better in January. Slowly, things improve in February. Finally, by the end of the month, a pale gray dawn peeks through my skylight and gently wakes me. Then BAM, the second Sunday in March plunges early mornings back into darkness.

Let me explain. I was one of those sleepy headed kids. The one that all the mothers in the neighborhood worried about oversleeping and missing kindergarten. That was then. Now, I like mornings and getting up around six. However, perhaps it’s a throwback, but I don’t like getting up in the dark. And by the way, who does? I dare you to name one person who loves their alarm clock.

Anyway, I like having the sun give me a poke and gently prod me out of the Land of Nod. I can stretch, turn on the news and luxuriate for ten minutes or so before bounding out of bed. Alright, okay, some mornings it is more of a shuffle than a bound. But either or, it’s hard to do when it’s still night outside. And yes, I know it stays light later and I should be grateful but it’s no help at six in the morning.

Some blame Benjamin Franklin for daylight saving time but they would be wrong. While living in Paris, Ben wrote a satirical essay entitled “An Economical Project.” After being rudely awakened at six o’clock one morning, he realized that Paris was in full sunshine. The early-to-bed/early-to-rise founding father’s essay promoted the thrifty advantages of working and playing in daylight. However, he never actually recommended a time change, His mocking prose indicates that, while not at all anxious to do so himself, Ben thought the rest of the world should get up with the sun.

Over decades and centuries, various proponents of daylight saving time have lobbied for the cause. It found temporary traction during World War I. It was once again implemented in World War II but discontinued with the armistice. However, this time, there were more than a few holdouts. A number of cities and towns across the country implemented their own daylight saving time, all with different start and end dates. At one point there were twenty-three different daylight saving time schedules … in Iowa alone.

The chaos ended with the Uniform Time Act. While giving states the option to implement or not, the Act standardized start and end dates. After moving around a bit, daylight saving time now runs from the second Sunday in March to the first Sunday in November.

And by the way, farmers have never lobbied for daylight saving time. The time change upsets the cows. They don’t care if it’s five, six or seven; both farmers and their cows like to wake up with the sun. (Perhaps I was a farmer in a past life.) On the other hand, urban and suburban businesses love it. It seems people shop more when it’s still light after work.

Anyway, there’s always the upside – enjoy the afternoon sunshine and bon appétit!

Spaghetti with Roasted Brussels Sprouts & Bacon
It’s not quite spring yet! There’s still plenty of time for cozy comfort food. Brussels sprout tossed with bacon and spaghetti is a cozy but easy weeknight meal. Enjoy!
Serves 4

Olive oil
About 4 ounces thick-cut bacon, chopped
About 8 ounces Brussels sprouts, trimmed and quartered
1/4-1/2 cup chicken broth
About 1/4 onion, finely chopped
1 clove garlic, minced
1/2 teaspoon thyme
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
8-12 ounces spaghetti
1-2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
About 1/4 cup chopped walnuts, toasted
Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, grated

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.

Lightly coat a large oven-proof skillet with olive oil and heat over medium. Add the bacon and cook until crisp. Transfer the bacon to a paper towel and reserve.

Add the Brussels sprouts to the skillet and toss to coat. Add the chicken broth and roast the Brussels sprouts at 375 degrees for 10 minutes.

Add the onion and garlic, sprinkle with thyme, season with salt and pepper and toss to combine. Stirring a few times, continue roasting the vegetables until tender and lightly browned, 20-30 minutes.

Meanwhile, cook the spaghetti according to package directions less 1 minute. Reserving about 1/2 cup of the pasta water, drain the pasta.

Add the spaghetti and bacon to the Brussels sprouts plus some pasta water, drizzle with vinegar and toss to combine. Cover and simmer on medium for 1-2 minutes.

Transfer the pasta to a large platter or individual shallow bowls, sprinkle with walnuts and grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese and serve.

Print-friendly version of this recipe.

One Year Ago – Pork Stew with Beans & Greens
Two Years Ago – Shrimp Curry with Spinach
Three Years Ago – Mini Tarte Tatin
Four Years Ago – Lemon Roasted Chicken
Five Years Ago – Panna Cotta with Strawberries
Six Years Ago – Decadent Mac & Cheese
Seven Years Ago – Seared Scallops with Roasted Pepper Sauce
Eight Years Ago –
Creole Shrimp with Creamy Grits
Nine Years Ago –
Wild Mushroom Risotto
Ten Years Ago –
Swimming Pool Jello

Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!

Are you for or against or … the time change? Feel free to share!

Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook. © Susan W. Nye, 2019

Selective Memory & Alpine Mac & Cheese

The local schools are closed for winter break. It’s time to ski! When it comes to family ski vacations, I admit it – I have selective memory. The snow was always perfect. In fact, it snowed every night. Come morning, the sun always shone and the slopes were perfectly groomed. The dog, who loved to roll in the snow, had a brilliant shiny coat. At the end of a long ski day, we were too tired to squabble and the house was a model of peace and harmony.

Except for the part about the dog, none of the above is actually true. Or at least, they are only partially true. While February is a very good month for all those S-sports – skiing, sledding, skating and snowshoeing – I’m sure we had a few rocky vacations. And by rocky, I mean it literally – as in not enough snow to cover the rocks on the ski hill. I’m just as certain that my sister and I never went a full week without a spat; particularly when we were teenagers. (Of course, it was never my fault.)

The truth of the matter, hard as I try, I can’t remember a single February vacation without snow. Instead I remember happy days clambering around on skis. The late afternoons and evenings were just as happy. These hours were spent twirling on skates, jumping off the deck and flying down the hill across the road on our sleds.

Speaking of skates, there was that one time when my brother fell through the ice on the frog pond. He was maybe six. It was probably during February vacation. Although scary, it’s not a terribly traumatic story. As far as I know, John hasn’t suffered any lasting physical or psychic damage. Even for a little boy, the pond is probably only about chest deep. No, the story made a lasting impression because it was so well told.

A neighbor passed by at just the right moment and threw John in the back of her station wagon and hurried him home. With wide eyes and more than an ounce of gratitude, John shared the tale of his rescue. One of the neighborhood teenagers had raced across the little pond with his hockey stick and pulled him out of the icy water. From the telling, you’d have guessed that the skater was about to join the Boston Bruins or the Olympic speed skating team.

A few years later, that same brother (I have only one) broke his leg during winter vacation. It was in Colorado – our first family trip outside of the northeast. The snow really was magnificent and it really did snow every night. Thank goodness John waited until the very end of the week.

On the last run of a wonderful day on the slopes, John caught an edge and took a tumble. He was carted down the mountain on a sled and the rest of the family followed. At the bottom, Mom and Dad hopped into the ambulance with him … leaving me with four pairs of skis to lug back to the condo. If it wasn’t for lugging, I suppose I might have forgotten the whole thing.

So yes, when it comes to family ski vacations, I have selective memory. The snow was always perfect. Any injuries were minor. The one or two that required hospitalization left no scar. Instead, they added another interesting chapter to family lore.

Local kids are off from school this week. Have a blast and bon appétit!

Alpine Mac & Cheese
This recipe shows you what happens when America’s favorite comfort food spends winter break in the Swiss Alps. Enjoy!
Serves 8-12

Butter for the pan
8 ounces thick cut bacon, chopped
1 onion, finely chopped
1 teaspoon thyme
1/4 teaspoon smoked paprika
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
2 cloves garlic, minced
1/4 cup dry white wine
1-2 tablespoons kirsch* (optional)
4 ounces cream cheese at room temperature
1 cup sour cream
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
2 tablespoons butter
3 tablespoons flour
2 cups whole milk or half and half
1 pound your favorite short pasta – penne, rigatoni, bowties …
8 ounces Gruyere cheese, shredded
8 ounces Emmental cheese, shredded
2 ounces Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, grated
1/2 cup Panko bread crumbs
1/2 teaspoon herbs de Provence
1 tablespoon melted butter or olive oil

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Lightly butter a large casserole.

Heat a skillet over medium, add the bacon and cook, stirring frequently until lightly browned. Remove the bacon from the pan, drain and reserve.

Drain the excess fat from the pan, add the onion, sprinkle with thyme, paprika and nutmeg, season with salt and pepper and sauté until translucent. Add the garlic and cook for 2 minutes more. Add the wine and simmer until almost dry. Remove from the heat and stir in the kirsch.

Put the cream cheese in a large bowl, add the sour cream and mustard and stir or beat with an electric mixer until smooth.

Melt the butter in a heavy saucepan over medium heat. Add the flour, season with salt and pepper and cook, whisking, for 1-2 minutes. Whisking constantly, add the milk and heat to steaming over medium. Reduce the heat to low and cook, whisking, until the sauce thickens. A little at a time, stir the warm sauce into the cream cheese mixture. Add the bacon and onion and stir to combine.

Meanwhile, cook the pasta according to package directions, less 1 minute. Drain the pasta, saving a little of the pasta water.

Combine the pasta and sauce and toss to combine. If the pasta seems dry, add a little pasta water. Sprinkle the pasta with the Gruyere, Emmental and half of the Parmigiano-Reggiano and toss again. Transfer the pasta to the prepared baking dish.

Put the breadcrumbs and herbs in a bowl, add the melted butter and toss to combine. Add the remaining the Parmigiano-Reggiano and toss again. Sprinkle the breadcrumbs on top of the mac & cheese.

You can make ahead to this point, cool to room temperature, cover and refrigerate. Remove the dish from the refrigerator about 1 hour before baking.

Bake the mac & cheese at 375 degrees for 30 minutes or until piping hot and golden.

* About Kirsch – A spirit made from cherries, traditional cheese fondue recipes add a shot of kirsch just before serving.

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One Year Ago – Fettucine with Mushrooms & Kale
Two Years Ago – Spaghetti with Cauliflower & Olives
Three Years Ago – Flourless Chocolate Cake
Four Years Ago – Lemon Roasted Chicken Thighs
Five Years Ago – Panna Cotta with Strawberries
Six Years Ago – Decadent Mac & Cheese
Seven Years Ago – Seared Scallops with Roasted Pepper Sauce
Eight Years Ago – Creole Shrimp & Cheesy Grits
Nine Years Ago – White Bean Dip
Ten Years Ago – Warm Chocolate Pudding

Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!

What are your favorite winter vacation memories? Feel free to share!

Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook. © Susan W. Nye, 2019

How to Avoid a Power Outage & Chicken Soup Florentine

When we were little kids, an approaching snowstorm was cause for excitement. With any luck, school would be cancelled. Yes, we did love those snow days. As it so happens, I still do. Com’on, who doesn’t like to spend the day in leggings and a ratty, no-longer-allowed-in-public turtleneck?

Now, I grew up in suburbia where power outages were rare. A snow day meant we could hang out in our PJs and watch television or read books until Mom sent us outside to build a snowman. As a would-be grownup, I can still hang out but a movie binge only works if the power stays on.

My neighborhood generally loses power a couple times a year. It happens when heavy snow takes down a tree which in turn takes down a power line. Sometime, instead of snow, a monster wind knocks them down. Or a frigid rain leaves a thick coat of ice on the lines, causing them to snap. Finally, and thankfully less frequently, some yahoo drives too fast and takes out a pole.

Just like a kid with inside-out and backwards PJs and ice cubes down the toilet, I’ve developed a series of rituals to ensure the lights stay on in spite of an approaching storm. I suppose none of this would be necessary if I invested in a generator but what’s the fun in that?

These rituals are not foolproof but, heck, they worked for the last two storms. Feel free to join me. For any hope of success, you must complete all the steps. The order doesn’t matter but completeness does. Just think, you might save your neighborhood from a power outage. Here goes:

Have the power company’s number handy so you’re ready to call the minute the lights go out.

Fill at least three large buckets with water. You’ll need it to refill the toilet after flushing. Fill several jugs or pitchers with water for drinking and cooking.

Run the dishwasher – even half-full. You’ll want plenty of clean dishes if the power goes out.

Do any urgent laundry. Of course, you define urgent but, if it were me and I was down to my last pair of leggings, I’d do a load.

Take a nice long shower. You want to be clean too.

Rummage around and locate every flashlight in the house. Check the batteries and stock up as needed.

Have candles ready as well as matches. Dinner, even in a power outage, tastes better by candlelight.

Don’t be left incommunicado – charge your phone. While you’re at it, charge your tablet and laptop.

Make soup. Whether the snow is gently falling or the wind is howling, there is nothing like curling up in front of the fire with a good book and a mug of soup.

And, just in case the power stays out for a couple of day … have plenty of wine on hand.

It worked last week. Hopefully, it will next time! Bon appétit!

Chicken Soup Florentine
Lights on or off, this delicious soup is great on a cold, winter evening. Enjoy!
Serves 8

Olive oil
1 1/2-2 pounds boneless, skinless chicken breast
1 large onion, finely chopped
3 stalks celery, finely chopped
2 carrots, finely chopped
1 teaspoon dried thyme
Pinch or to taste dried pepper flakes
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 or more quarts chicken stock
1/2 cup dry white wine
1 bay leaf
1 piece Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese rind* (optional)
1 pound whole mushrooms, trimmed and chopped
1 pound baby spinach

Heat a little olive oil in a large soup kettle over medium-high heat. Sear the chicken, 1-2 minutes per side. Remove from the pot and reserve.

If necessary, add a little more olive oil to the pot. Add the onion, celery and carrot, sprinkle with thyme and pepper flakes and season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring frequently for 5 minutes or until the vegetables begin to soften. Add the garlic and cook 1-2 minutes more.

Return the chicken to the pot, add the stock, wine and bay leaf and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to low and simmer for 5 minutes or until the chicken is cooked through.

Transfer the chicken to a cutting board. When the chicken is cool enough to handle, cut or shred it into bitesize pieces.

Meanwhile, heat a little olive oil in a skillet, add the mushrooms and sauté until lightly browned.

Return the chicken to the pot and add the mushrooms. Bring the soup to a boil, reduce the heat to low and simmer for 10 minutes.

This soup is best when made in advance to this point. If you have the time, cool the soup to room temperature and refrigerate for several hours or overnight.

If the soup is too thick, add more stock. Raise the heat to medium-high, add the spinach and stir to combine and wilt. Simmer for 2-3 minutes and serve.

* Adding a piece of Parmigiano-Reggiano rind will add flavor and richness to your soup.

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One Year Ago – Orecchiette with Cauliflower & Bacon
Two Years Ago – Romaine & Radicchio Caesar Salad
Three Years Ago – Sausages with White Beans
Four Years Ago – Chocolate Panna Cotta
Five Years Ago – Turkey Scaloppini with Prosciutto & Sage
Six Years Ago – Cheese Fondue
Seven Years Ago – Flatbread with Mushrooms, Caramelized Onions & Spinach
Eight Years Ago – Tuscan White Bean Soup
Nine Years Ago – Wild Mushroom Risotto
Ten Years Ago – Swimming Pool Jello

Or Click Here! for a complete list of and links to all the recipes on this blog!

What are your favorite snow day rituals? Feel free to share!

Want more? I’ve got links to lots more to read, see & cook. © Susan W. Nye, 2019